Gorilla Glass

"New" 48 year old invention.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ope6uViLcEY

Interesting video. Its nice that its stronger than regular glass, but I
would have liked to see them push it until it did break.
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Was this video made in 1987? It sure sounds and looks like it.
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wrote:

I would not be surprised. The product was developed in 1962.
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wrote:

It has properties that are not dissimilar to the original Pyrex, which is borosilicate glass (still available as cookware in Europe, but it's not the Pyrex sold for that purpose today in the US). "Gorilla glass" is aluminosilicate.
--
Ed Huntress



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Ed Huntress wrote:

Anchor Hocking still makes & sells borosilicate glass products in the US. A search on their site gives 442 hits so you're wrong, yet again.
<http://www.anchorhocking.com/search.html?search=borosilicate+glass
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wrote:

Not since 1998, Michael. Read what I said above. Pyrex cookware sold in the US today is tempered soda lime glass, and has been for over a decade. That's why Anchor Hocking doesn't call their glass products "Pyrex."
Once again, in your desperate quest to prove your superiority, you've stuck your foot in your mouth.
Check your facts, Michael. You should know better by now.
--
Ed Huntress

>
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Unless something changed recently, Ed is absolutely correct. I looked into this a while back.
Wes
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Both Michael and Ed are correct. Or very close to correct. I think it was Corning Glass not Dow Corning that owned the tradename " Pyrex ". When Corning Glass was selling bakeware , Pyrex was borosilicate glass. And Anchor Hocking was also selling borosilicate glass bakeware. But Corning Glass sold the tradename to World Kitchens. And World Kitchens now uses the tradename " Pyrex " to denote soda- lime glass that has been tempered. Anchor Hocking is still selling borosilicate glass bakeware. Naturally they do not call their bakeware by another companies tradename, but you can buy bakeware that is the same as the original Pyrex in the U.S. But you can't buy it with the trade name Pyrex.
The borosilicate bakeware is better at not shattering because of uneven heating or cooling. The tempered soda-lime glass may or may not be better at not breaking when dropped.
Dan
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Wes wrote:

Anchor Hocking can't use the name Pyrex, but they sell borosilicate glassware. I bought some a month ago, and their website had 442 hits for "borosilicate glass".
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On 8/8/2010 3:16 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

You might want to look more closely at those 442 hits. Searching on borosilicate alone yields 9 hits, searching on borosilicate glass yields 443, however examining them it appears that 434 of them do not contain the world "borosilicate"--apparently the search is on "borosilicate OR glass" rather than "borosilicate AND glass" or the phrase "borosilicate glass".
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

The Anchor Hocking items I purchased state that they are made of borosilicate glass. Are you going to claim that they weren't?
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On 8/10/2010 4:10 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I'm not "claiming" anything except that there are only nine items on the Anchor Hocking web site that are specifically described on that site as being made from borosilicate glass, and there appears to be no general statement on that site that Anchor Hocking products are made from borosilicate. If you can show that others currently for sale are also made from it, please provide a list of products and SKU numbers (and, ideally, links to photos of the labels showing the SKU number and the "borosilicate glass" statement) so that others wanting borosilicate glass can benefit from your experience.
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wrote:

Just to set the record straight, there are no Anchor Hocking cookware items made of borosilicate glass. There are a few pieces of their stemware that are, and some decorative canisters. But no cookware. All of their cookware is made of tempered soda-lime glass, just like US-sold Pyrex.
As far as they know, there is no borosilicate glass cookware sold on the US market. I have no way of checking that for accuracy.
--
Ed Huntress



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On 8/10/2010 5:34 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

Bodum sells some borosilicate measuring cups.
Saint Gobain Vidros sells Brazilian-made "Marinex" brand borosilicate bakeware in the US if you can find it--Amazon.com lists quite a lot of it. Note that they also have a line of tableware sold under the same brand name that appears to be tempered soda-lime so read the details carefully.
Arcuisine in France sells a couple of sizes of borosilicate baking dish on the US market--google "arcuisine elegance" and you should find a number or sources.
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wrote:

Interesting. Arc in France makes borosilicate Pyrex, but it isn't sold here. I wonder what the relationship is, if any, between Arcuisine and Arc?
--
Ed Huntress



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On 8/10/2010 7:22 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

"Arcuisine Elegance" is the product that is sold in the UK as "Pyrex Elegance".
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wrote:

The plot thickens. <g>
Last November, after we had our earlier discussion about this, after Iggy's baking dish explosion, I had a lawyer friend look into the prospects for importing Arc Pyrex into the US (importing cookware used to be one of my parents' businesses, and I was interested.) Basically, he said "no way." Pyrex is sewed up. To sell under another brand, you'd have to be prepared to spend big bucks to build a brand.
--
Ed Huntress



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On 8/10/2010 8:42 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

Depends on how big a market you want. I doubt that they're trying to dethrone Pyrex as a brand.
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wrote:

My family having been in that business for years, but long before web marketing, our experience was that marketing niche items in that market is expensive business. There are several angles you can take but they're either fiercely price competitive, at the low end, or they require some kind of prestige cache, at the high end. My idea was that, if you could market "original Pyrex," you'd have a natural. But it appears that the license holders have it sewn up pretty tight. No surprise.
--
Ed Huntress



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On 8/10/2010 10:32 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

It looks like there's a niche market for borosilicate bakeware that none of the big players in the US are filling. That seems to be what Saint Gobain and Arc are going after.
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