Grinder pedestal

I am looking for a heavy duty grinder pedestal. Are HF grinder pedestals any good? It's hard to tell from the picture on their website.

Thanks, Alex

Reply to
Alex
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Probably serviceable, proly like the Sears pedestal I have, but nothing to write home about.

They are painfully easy to kluge, tho. I made a couple thusly:

1/4-1/2" plate, about 16x24--long enough that you can actually stand on the front, to stabilize the grinder as you use it. I glued cork on the bottom. 1.5-2" angle iron or tubing. You can easily get concentric square or round tubing, if you want it to telescope, for height adjustments. Some 45 deg bracing at the bottom. A suitably sized/drilled plate on top. On which you could also fashion lips etc for water holders, goosenecks, etc. On the vertical angle iron or tubing, you could also weld some shelving to hold wheels, paraphernalia, altho vibration on some grinders might make this more of an annoyance than a help.

A welder is pretty much req'd for this project.

Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®

I've stood in front of them. They seem to me to be of medium construction but quite short. If you are 5'9" tall or shorter you might be able to use one as is, but I think most people will have to increase the height. You could do this quickly by putting it on a block of wood, or you could cut the column and splice in a piece of pipe which would probably be more satisfactory.

GWE

Reply to
Grant Erwin

Got a welder? Make one. I made a few using 15" auto wheels and 4" iron pipe with a top plate cut to fit the grinder. I cut the shallow side off the wheel and use the deep side for the base. To make it more stable I extended the pipe through the rim and welded a cross brace, then dumped in some lead shot to fill the pipe to the level of the rim. Makes it nice and stable, and by having a round base I can just tilt it and wheel it around as needed.

Reply to
Steve W.

If you left the tire on the rim, you'd have extra stability and good vibration damping as well. :) Just have to fill it up once in a while, w/ air. :) :)

Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®

Does that mean that you have a source for cheap shot? I was looking for some to make a shot beater bag and I couldn't afford it. Bob

Reply to
Bob Engelhardt

I have found pedestal grinders to be very unstable. Depending, of course on what is being ground. A TIG tungsten grinder would be fine on a car rim pedestal. But when you want to exert a little force, they usually can be tippy, particularly with a good heavy grinder on top. And the rule is: the more the grinder costs, the easier it will be to fall over and hit the floor.

So, I like either mounting it to a plate, and then to the floor, mounting it to a bench or stationary object, or making a stand where the area you stand is part of the base, and adds greater stability to whole contraption.

YMM(and probably does)V

Steve

Reply to
Steve B

Um, haven't you noticed that all the commercial grinder pedestals insist you bolt them to the floor?

Pete C.

Reply to
Pete C.

Exactly. That's what I did. Rubber or cork between the base and floor helps w/ vibration, as well as "walking". Course, if you used a truck rim and tire, you could stand on that, too! :)

Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®

Doubt I can get that one into my cellar!

Nick

Reply to
Nick Müller

"Pete C." wrote

Um, my wife "insists" I do a lot of things. I usually end up doing some of them like she wants, others are compromises, and others go on the "list of things to never do".

There's a hundred ways to cook poodle, but it all ends up tasting like chicken.

Steve

Reply to
Steve B

True but I'm using this one on a wood apron outside my smithy.

Reply to
Steve W.

I have one each of the HF pedestals. The cheaper one is too short, as others have said. I mounted my grinder on a short chunk of 6X6 to bring it up to a useable height. It also is rather light weight.

OTOH, the more expensive one is taller, quite heavy and supports my buffer very well. It can be found on sale for around 30 bucks.

I'm making a third one out of a Hoffman pedestal (made for mounting electrical control boxes). The hollow, square column will contain the belt from the lower mounted motor going up to the mandrel mounted on top. With the large base plate, it should be pretty stable, too.

Joe

Reply to
jgandalf

I have made them from 15-inch wheel rims also. They work pretty well.

But the best one I made is for my 10-inch grinder. I used a flywheel I salvaged from an auto junk yard. I believe it is from some kind of old gas truck engine from the 40's-50's. It's 20 inches in diameter and about

2 -inches thick at the thickest part and only ¾-inch at the thinnest. Must weigh close to 75-80 pounds at least.

Regular Chevy V-8 flywheels are what I used as a base for my 6-inch grinder and my 8-inch grinder/polisher. I also have made base's for volley ball nets out of 15-inch wheel rims and 1-inch pipe, and also a tether ball pole.

Diamond Jim

Reply to
Diamond Jim

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