Grinder vibration

I bought a nice Dayton pedestal grinder recently.

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It is 3/4 HP, 8 inch wheel diameter, 7 amps IIRC, and has a dust collector in the back, which is why I liked it so much -- less dust makes for a better life. So if all goes well, I will replace my 1/2 HP Baldor with it.

HOWEVER, this Dayton grinder vibrates. Not too much, but the Baldor does not vibrate at all, so this stands out. I can and will check the spindle with a dial indicator, but by looking at wheels, the spindle does not seem to be too bent, the wheels are not wobbly etc. All in all, the vibration is very noticeable, but not too bad. I think that what causes the vibration is a minute imbalance of wheels.

I read a little bit about "bench grinder vibration" and it seems that the recommended course of action is to dress the wheels. So my plan, for now, is to take a diamond wheel dressing stick and to try to dress it flat. I am not sure, at this point, how exactly to ensure that the wheel is square after dressing. Any tips from those who did this, will me much appreciated.

Reply to
Ignoramus28956
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You can dress a wheel like this with a 1" Carborundum stick. They are about six inches long. The better method is a wheel dresser that has a half dozen rotating wheels mounted in a metal "handle".

Reply to
Dick 'Tater

Dick's recommendation is the standard, but I like the one I use. I made a pivoting arm that is spring loaded, whose arc crosses the wheel face at a 90 degree angle. Attached to this is a threaded diamond tipped stud. This is the same solution used by "Diamond" drill sharpeners. Works great. Lasts forever. Also, pay close attention to the mounting hub of the wheel. It is quite common the hub center is not center and even after dressing, the wheel is still unbalanced. Steve

Reply to
Steve Lusardi

Dick and Steve, thanks, after some dressing with the above mentioned dressing stick, the grinder is now quiet. (of course the dust collector is not quiet)

i

Reply to
Ignoramus28956

On Nov 13, 11:25=A0am, "Dick 'Tater" wrote: ...

It's a Huntington style wheel dresser.

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Reply to
Jim Wilkins

I agree with the "star wheel" dresser. BUT---- I bought one at HF and it is a disaster! I also had an older "real one" and, even though it's almost worn out, it works MUCH better than the HF model. I am not a HF basher. This product simply does not do the job.

Pete Stanaitis

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Dick 'Tater wrote:

Reply to
spaco

Mine is from McMaster-Carr, works OK so far. Item 4528A1.

i

Reply to
Ignoramus28956

I wonder how someone could make such a simple and basic design in a way that would cause it not to work well? Do the wheels not rotate freely or is there something unusual about the design or material of the wheels themselves?

Don Young

Reply to
Don Young

Nothing beats the application of a sintered silicon carbide dressing stick after truing a wheel. They're easy to apply, and cheap to buy. A star dresser would do a better job of preparing the wheel for grinding, but the difference in performance is not big enough to warrant the inconvenience of using the star dresser.

If I was you, I'd give replacing a Baldor with a Dayton more than just a little thought. That's akin to trading in your Bentley for a damned VW.

Harold

Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

A Bentley *is* a VW.

Reply to
Mike

Close. BMW bought them.

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

It might be the wheel. In the woodworking forums, people use the Oneway products for grinding lathe tools. Oneway makes a wheel balancer kit. It's extremely expensive ($63), and frankly if the wheel is not balanced, I'd return thw wheel.

Reply to
Maxwell Lol

It looks nice.

I'm a little late weighing it, because I've had company for the past two day, and been quite busy with them.

What I would suggest first is to remove the wheels, flanges, and nuts entirely, to make sure that the motor itself is not unbalanced for some reason or other. Then add one set of flanges and nut and see what it does. Then loosen them and add the wheel. Note that most wheels have larger holes than the shank of the grinder, so they are fitted with some form of bushing to centralize them before dressing. The older ones had a bushing of lead -- probably poured into the wheel and formed around a mandrel. Later ones that I have seen were equipped with a plastic bushing instead -- the ones which I have seen were bright red, but I suspect that other colors exist.

If you simply mount the wheel without the bushing, let it be off center, and then dress so the OD is concentric, it will be still somewhat out of balance -- but not nearly as badly so as if you had left the whole wheel off center without dressing.

So -- check the concentricity.

But Baldor is a better name, so perhaps you should check whether it will mount on the base which you have -- and perhaps use the dust collector too.

Enjoy, DoN.

Reply to
DoN. Nichols

Assuming you asking about the wheel dresser, not about the OP's grinder: It seems that the star wheels just aren't hard enough or something. They do spin around freely, just like the wheels on the one that works. I just went out to the shop to compare the two units. The wheels look identical. On the "good" one, there are 2 star wheels, one "washer" and

2 star wheels. On the HF model there is one star wheel, one "washer" 2 star wheels, one "washer" and one star wheel. Hmmmmm---. The handles are a little different, but that's not an issue. Now that you've made me go to all that trouble, maybe I'll take one of those "washers" off and see what happens.

Pete Stanaitis

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D>>I agree with the "star wheel" dresser. BUT---- I bought one at HF and it

Reply to
spaco

Don Young

Reply to
Don Young

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