HELP: Required Tools to stock my shop?

I need to know what tools (basic to advanced) should
be stocked in my dunebuggy/sandrail/auto fabrication shop?
Usually working with +/- 2" tubing, plate steel
and sheet metal of various thickness...
what should I have in the shop?
type of screwdrivers?
type of hammers?
type of drills?
type of welders?
type of grinders?
type of etc...?
need help to get this shop stocked correctly...
TIA,
FrOg
Reply to
FrOg
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FrOg wrote in article ...
With no malice intended, it would appear that you do not have enough experience to be building the type of machines in which people could be seriously injured - or killed.
If you had worked at automotive/metal fabrication in the past, your experience would make you more than familiar with the various hand tools and shop equipment that is necessary to properly construct these chassis and components.
At the very least, you should visit different automotive and non-automotive metal fabricating shops in your area to get a handle on the sorts of things that must be addressed to build a safe vehicle, and the tools and equipment necessary to achieve those goals.
Your message suggests that you do not even have a good familiarity with the sorts of hand tools required, let alone the more sophisticated power metalworking tools such as tubing benders, welders, cutters, etc.
Before you get your shop stocked correctly with tools and equipment, you need to get your knowledge and experience bases stocked correctly.
The correct selection of tools and equipment for the type of work your shop does will come from that knowledge and experience.
Bob Paulin - R.A.C.E. Race Car Chassis Setup & Dial-in Services
Reply to
Bob Paulin
Sounds like an ambitious project. I have built my own sandrail and helped on several others. We had seven rails in my family at one time.
If you are starting from scratch, I would recommend buying already built frames and go from there. You are talking a sizable investment in machines and space to fabricate frames.
The most important machines needed then would be welders. You could get by with just an arc welder if you are very good. Mig, Tig, and oxy/acetylene all have a place in that also. A plasma cutter will help. You will need grinders and sanders. 4-1/2 and 7" hand held angle grinders/sanders. A bench grinder, belt sander, disc sander help also.
You will need to be able to make holes. Good hand power drills and a drill press. The drill bits will need to be good quality. A vertical mill is a big plus as is a lathe.
On the sheet metal end, count on a foot shear, box or finger brake, hand shears, nibbler and maybe a slip roll.
You will need jack stands, jacks, engine stand, engine hoist, chain hoist.
The list of hand tools is quite large. Screwdrivers, pliers, metric and standard wrenches and sockets, many hammers of different styles and weights, hacksaw, files, clamps, vises.
If you wish to keep everything square and aligned, you should be building these on a nice flat surface. A nice large fab table or plate does the job.
You will need measuring and layout tools of many types. A tape measure won't cut it. I've really only touched on what is needed. It would take quite a bit of time to get into details.
You are looking at a large investment in tools and machines if you are starting from scratch. Buy the best you can afford. Cheap import crap will be a waste of money and only frustrate you.
It takes time to acquire the tools to do this type of work. And there is always one more tool to be purchased that will make life easier.
It sounds like you have a lot of homework to do if you plan on being serious about this.
Truthfully, the best thing you can do is get a job at a shop that is doing this type of work. Even sweeping the floor will allow you to see what tools and skills are needed for this type of work.
Good luck. Les
Reply to
Ljwebb11
This is like me asking what tools I need to do brain surgery? Some people don't have a clue.
Or... a troll!?
Lane
Reply to
Lane
Sure, ya just buy them from Sears!
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
This is like me asking what tools I need to do brain surgery? ^^^^^^^^^^ Sure, ya just buy them from Sears! ^^^^^^^^^^ Interesting you should bring that up, because I have been thinking of going into the brain surgery business. Will I be better off working in a hospital, or can I save money by having a store front, walk-in kind of place. What is the best kind of operating table to get, and are there any special kind of scalpels and stuff that I ought to have? I don't mind spending some money, but I don't want to go out and buy a bunch of stuff that I will have to replace after I know more about what I am doing.
Also, can anyone suggest a good place to learn brain surgery?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Read Craig Vertosik's book, "You're Never the Same Once the Air Hits Your Brain."
It is indeed a real eye (er, skull) opener about neurosurgery.
How to do lumbar punctures. How to engrave an insult into a piece of somebody's skull, and get caught doing it, too! How to survive as a resident in a teaching hospital.
Great book.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
Practice makes perfect! Lots of practice. Be sure to discount your services while you practice. When you get good, then you can charge the higher rates.
To save money, use exacto blades from the hobby store, just make sure to use a new one with each patient. Hang a sign on your mailbox in front of your house and convert an unused room into the operating room. And don't bother with those pesky medical licenses and malpractice insurance.
Lane
Reply to
Lane
Bob...I have worked around autos my whole life...my dad was a mechanic, and I have built 3 different sand cars...restored 2 motorcycles (frame-off) and have always performed my own automotive work...
I will be graduating from welding (MIG/TIG/ARC) school in 20 weeks and would really like to get a business going and was just looking for input from the group as to what they might stock a shop with given the chance to start from scratch...
here's my wish list so far:
Dewalt Hacksaw Tape Measure Engineers Square Scriber Vernier Callipers Protractor Various files 6" Bench mounted Vise C clamps & welding clamps Hammers sheet metal nibbler Electric Jig-Saw & Drill Pop rivit Gun Pipe Bending tool Marker Pen 20'' DISC SANDER/GRINDER 1 TON ARBOR PRESS 2 HP 10" BENCH GRINDER HEAVY DUTY COMBINATION BELT/DISC SANDER 16 SPEED FLOOR DRILL PRESS 1 HP 7" x 12" HYDRAULIC FEED METAL CUTTING BANDSAW 10'' INDUSTRIAL CIRCULAR COLD SAW PIPE AND TUBING NOTCHER 17'' BANDSAW HEAVY DUTY ROLLER STAND HEAVY DUTY GRINDER STAND WITH STORAGE TRAY HEAVY DUTY PIPE BENDER WHEEL CLAMP TIRE CHANGER 10 PC. COLOR CODED METRIC T-HANDLED HEX KEY SET 10 PC. COLOR CODED SAE T-HANDLED HEX KEY SET 2 PC. NUT SPLITTER SET 45 PC, METRIC TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED ALLOY STEEL TAP & DIE SET 45 PC, SAE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED ALLOY STEEL TAP & DIE SET 1/2" PLANETARY GEAR REVERSIBLE PNEUMATIC DRILL 3/8'' REVERSIBLE AIR DRILL 3/8'' AIR ANGLE DRILL 2'' AIR ANGLE SANDER HIGH SPEED AIR BODY SAW
Reply to
FrOg
I have worked around autos my whole life...my dad was a mechanic, and I have built 3 different sand cars...restored 2 motorcycles (frame-off) and have always performed my own automotive work...
I will be graduating from welding (MIG/TIG/ARC) school in 20 weeks and would really like to get a business going and was just looking for input from the group as to what they might stock a shop with given the chance to start from scratch...
here's my wish list so far:
Dewalt Hacksaw Tape Measure Engineers Square Scriber Vernier Callipers Protractor Various files 6" Bench mounted Vise C clamps & welding clamps Hammers sheet metal nibbler Electric Jig-Saw & Drill Pop rivit Gun Pipe Bending tool Marker Pen 20'' DISC SANDER/GRINDER 1 TON ARBOR PRESS 2 HP 10" BENCH GRINDER HEAVY DUTY COMBINATION BELT/DISC SANDER 16 SPEED FLOOR DRILL PRESS 1 HP 7" x 12" HYDRAULIC FEED METAL CUTTING BANDSAW 10'' INDUSTRIAL CIRCULAR COLD SAW PIPE AND TUBING NOTCHER 17'' BANDSAW HEAVY DUTY ROLLER STAND HEAVY DUTY GRINDER STAND WITH STORAGE TRAY HEAVY DUTY PIPE BENDER WHEEL CLAMP TIRE CHANGER 10 PC. COLOR CODED METRIC T-HANDLED HEX KEY SET 10 PC. COLOR CODED SAE T-HANDLED HEX KEY SET 2 PC. NUT SPLITTER SET 45 PC, METRIC TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED ALLOY STEEL TAP & DIE SET 45 PC, SAE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED ALLOY STEEL TAP & DIE SET 1/2" PLANETARY GEAR REVERSIBLE PNEUMATIC DRILL 3/8'' REVERSIBLE AIR DRILL 3/8'' AIR ANGLE DRILL 2'' AIR ANGLE SANDER HIGH SPEED AIR BODY SAW
Reply to
FrOg
I didn't notice any welders on your list. They're a definite must but I'm sure you know that already. :-)
Do you plan to use pipe or tubing to build frames/chassis and roll cages, etc? I ask because there's a big difference in benders for tubing vs. pipe benders. Many people have bought pipe benders planning to use them with tubing but it doesn't work.
And while we're wishing, I would think an auto rotisserie like the one in the link below would be great for welding sandrail frames:
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A good place to see what's available for the type of fabrication you plan to do is the Irvan-Smith site:
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Another good source is The Eastwood Company:
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Best Regards, Keith Marshall snipped-for-privacy@progressivelogic.com
"I'm not grown up enough to be so old!"
Reply to
Keith Marshall
These will be fabricated using 1.050 x 0.1 and larger round tubing and .75 x .75 x .065 and larger square tubing for the base...are there die for the square tube as well?
for those who don't know what a sandrail/dunebuggy is, this link is just on example of what they are:
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TIA, FrOg
Reply to
FrOg
Ditch Medicine. Required reading for every survivalist.
Be warned..the pictures are not for the faint of heart
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Gunner
"To be civilized is to restrain the ability to commit mayhem. To be incapable of committing mayhem is not the mark of the civilized, merely the domesticated." - Trefor Thomas
Reply to
Gunner
On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 10:34:49 GMT, Gunner brought forth from the murky depths:
Note to Jim: No wonder I couldn't find it. You flubbed -both- the title and the author's name. There was a copy in our library after all. In case anyone else is interested:
"When the Air Hits Your Brain" by M.D. Frank T. Vertosick Jr.
No gory pics at that URL. Were they in the book, Gunner?
---=====--- After all else fails, read the instructions. ---=====--- Website Design and Update
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Of course. Sorry for the confusion. The book is very detailed with good b&w photos of all the procedures, from how to debride a wound to removing a gangrenous limb, tying off the vessels and veins, , what sort of impromptu saw to use, how to install drains in the stump, etc etc. A very good book.
Btw..want to see what my left foot looks like at present after dropping a 25lb chunk of 1" plate steel across all 5 toes Monday night?
Its much better now after I popped the several golf ball sized blood blisters. I can only count 4 different colors. Its where they blend together that is the interesting part.
Gunner
"To be civilized is to restrain the ability to commit mayhem. To be incapable of committing mayhem is not the mark of the civilized, merely the domesticated." - Trefor Thomas
Reply to
Gunner
Uh oh. Busted!! That's what I get for posting without going downstairs and actually *inspecting* the bookshelf! Sorry for the confusion - but it is a great book. My mom (the nurse) suggested it to me.
Well I sure hope so!! Otherwise it will be a waste of money.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen

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