Help with Aerobed frame?

Maybe you guys can offer some advice?
I'm 48 yr old male suffer from GERD. This means I need
to have my bed head abt 6 inches higher than my
feet...maybe even a bit more.
I'm going back to college soon and will be moving. Have
gotten rid of all heavy furniture that requires two
people and a truck to move. Want to live light and
mobile.
My problem has been how to develop a bed that allows
this.
I recently bought an Aerobed from Costco and it would
work fine if I could figure out some way to raise the
head up higher than feet.
Link to Aerobed
formatting link

Got the idea that maybe a light frame that breaks down
for transport would work. In other words.... create
something like a water bed frame where the air mattress
sets down in the box frame.... thus allowing me to put
some support under the front of bed to raise it up abt
6 inches
However....I'm NOT a metal worker at all. Have no tools
at all
Could I buy something like this? Or have it made? If
yes Id need some plans.
Bottom line...any advice or help out there on how to go
abt this?
Reply to
me
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you can buy a 4x8 sheet of 3/4" plywood and lay it on the floor with some boards underneath that would make it tilt. a 40 minute project if you can find someone who can get plywood to your home.
As far as heartburn goes, starting to "eat less" and losing weight solved this annoying problem for myself permanently.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25686
Did doing the above eliminate it entirely so that you could sleep on normal bed again?
Reply to
me
It eliminated it entirely. I have no heartburn whatsoever.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25686
One trouble is that "Aerobeds" are junk I had 5 leaks first week.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
GERD can also be triggered by long term stress. Doctor gave me two choices, one being pills to remove the stress or address the stressors.
I cut way back on caffiene, switching to decaf. Dropped the jalapeno and habaneros for about four months.
Ignoramus25686 wrote:
Reply to
Louis Ohland
And if you want something more portable, you can either cut the plywood into a few crosswise strips at the store, or buy white pine to make slats. Make the frame from 2x4's or something wider if you want to make a real box.
Modern air mattresses are pretty durable, and comfortable... the two things to watch out for are leaving them firmly inflated during the day in the worst of summer (oops), inflating and deflating them so often that the coleman-style valve flexes to failure (oops), and returning home at 2 am and remembering that you haven't inflated it and doing so will annoy the neighbours (oops). Oh, and putting three items on a list of two cautions.
Seriously though... slept on air mattresses for a year, finally hauled ordinary mattress out of storage a few months ago - but still sleeping on the air mattress.
Reply to
cs_posting
really!!
Well I will see what happens to mine
I bought it at Costco so no problem taking it back
Reply to
me
Problem is, that Tom is taking his wire-brushes to bed.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
No offense, but you should be under a doctors care. If you are, you should be getting medication that eliminates your acid reflux, or GERD. Long term, it is a very serious condition and you should not be self medicating or trying to avoid going to the doctor. My brother in-law had heartburn for several years, avoided the doctor, self medicated (Tums, etc) and ended up with esophageal cancer. Recent news articles have declared this type of cancer the next big health problem for a society with too many self treatment options. Have your general medicine doctor send you to specialist for a more complete diagnosis. Have the specialist perform an endoscopy. I would, but then I'm a hypochondriac. YMMV. -Mike
snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:
Reply to
mlcorson
Yup. I had acid reflux in a bad way. Started puking up blood which got my attention. Surgery, one night stay at the hospital, and a couple weeks off of "real work" and I'm 100 percent better. Haven't needed ANY antacids or related medications in 10 years. google "nissen fundoplication".
If you're taking the medication more than occasionally, get it fixed before the acid digests your esophagus. It _is_ made of meat, after all, and that's what that acid is there for.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
How about a couple pieces of 6x6 timber under the proper end?
Gunner
"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism. As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Reply to
Gunner
You mean just "wedged" under the head of bed?
If yes.... I'm thinking that might be hard on the mattress since it will tend to bend in middle. Plus the wood being rough
Reply to
me
A close lady friend of mines brother is in the final stages of esophageal cancer and did exactly the same..ignored it for years.
Which was why I was so concerned when my wife developed some similar symptoms. The Biopsy came back last week..no cancer.
Praise (insert deity of your choice>
Gunner
"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism. As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Reply to
Gunner
You'll never know how close you are! We've had little bits of wire in our family's lives for as long as I can remember. It followed my dad home when we were kids, it was just normal to get a piece of wire in our feet. I thought every body had wire sticking them on a daily basis. It gets into everything, clings to cloathes and such. And this with at least some precautions, there are work shoes and home shoes, shoes were changed at work, factory shoes never left the factory, shoes were left at the door, etc... I'm sure I have wire imbedded in my body for many years.
However, that's not the case for the Aerobed, great idea and very comfortable! It's the welded seams that just pull apart on the edge of the weld. It's hard to patch. The mattress itself is the same as these camping inflatables, the pump unit is well done. If they made a better mattress, I would get another in a heart beat.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
You mean you have a bed with no frame? As for its too rough..put a blanket over the timbers before putting the air mattress on it.
Gunner
"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism. As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Reply to
Gunner
Given that it's right next to the more traditional option, because I find it more comfortable - could either because it should be or simply because it's what I'm used to, I don't care.
The one thing about depending on air mattresses is that you have to have a spare. But then that's good for guests, because they don't take up much space deflated. (I buy the ones without pumps which are cheaper)
Reply to
cs_posting
he has an inflatable mattress...
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25686
Metal content: OP has touched on a possible business opportunity. GERD is rampant in our high stress society and one of the first things that doctors suggest (in addition to proper medication, etc) is that the patient elevate the head of their bed to discourage the upward leaking of stomach acids.
Some beds do not lend themselves to elevation (waterbeds, platform beds, etc). In common, frame beds with the addition of bed riser pedestals, the sleeper tends to slide downhill during the night. The alternative use of wedge pillows is, literally, a pain in the neck.
It has been widely discussed on the Newsgroup, alt.support.heartburn, that no company seems to make a simple, economical bed that lends itself to head elevations and addresses the side effect issues. We're not talking expensive, multi-adjustable, hospital-type beds here nor the bend-at-the-waist home invalid types either.
FWIW, I have suffered from GERD for thirty years. Primary care doctors had me on the Tagamet-Zantac-Pepcid class of medications for many years. Finally, I mentioned the GERD and painfull swallowing of red meats to a gastroenterologist during preliminary interview for colonoscopy (father died of colon cancer). They recommended an endoscopy of the esophagus as well and, sure enough, diagnosed Barret's Esophagus, a precursor of potential esophageal cancer. They placed me on the Protonix-Prevacid-Nexium class of medications and a six-month follow-up found the condition completly cleared up. Moral to the story: see an appropriate specialist; that would be a gastroenterologist.
David Merrill
Reply to
David Merrill

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