HF band saw

We had a local store open up and they have the metal cutting band saw
for 150 bucks or so. I bought one of these cheap bandsaws at TSC
several years ago and went through two of them before I finally
returned them and bought a chop saw. The problem was the blade cutting
3 inch square tubing crooked.
Should I try it again or not?
Reply to
stryped
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stryped fired this volley in news:dece389d-4d46- snipped-for-privacy@y38g2000hsy.googlegroups.com:
Try truing up your blade guides instead. That uses up lots less gasoline and emotional energy.
(few bandsaws cut absolutely dead-on square, and never, ever with a worn blade)
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I've had one of these saws for several years now and for $150 it's a good bargain. In the vertical position you can cut sheet, something that a chop saw can't do.
Jim
Reply to
Jim Chandler
If the part of the blade guide that holds the ball bearings is bolted to the slotted extension bar then they can be tweaked to cut straight. Put the saw on a flat level floor when you do it so the bed doesn't twist. The cast iron flexes a lot more than you might think.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I seem to recall that there was a good web site or two around with detailed instructions on tuning and tweaking these small band saws.
Reply to
Pete C.
I never thought of that. how thick? I am wanting to make some triangle gussets out of 3/16. Could I use it for that?
Reply to
stryped
How can I tell if the Harbor Freight has this? (It is the red one). I am not sure what you mean by "slotted extension bar"
And how "straight" is "straight"?
Reply to
stryped
A definite "maybe". If you used the blades that came with the saw, then I'd try again. Get a high quality blade. A good one will cost about $20 or so. Doall, etc. Read this link:
Sorry to say, the old 4X6FAQ seems to be gone.
It was at:
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Now all I get is "coming soon"
Pete Stanaitis
Reply to
spaco
If you're talking about this sort of thing ,which I have had one of for maybe 10 years now, I have cut 2" aluminium plate and 1" bronze plate with it without problem. Use a good blade, I usually use Lenox which is what J&L stock in the UK in the size required. Main thing to bear in mind is the limited throat with the frame being behind and to the left of the blade, many times I have had to think through the operations to get the cuts completely through the part, where a dedicated vertical with deeper throat wouldn't have had a problem.
Reply to
David Billington
I don't see why not. Just set the band speed for slow (belt pulleys) and take it easy. I found that you can sit on the bed when the thing is vertical. Puts you down at the level of the work and makes it a lot more comfortable. Just down forget to put the lock pin in, that is unless you relish the idea of a face full of bandsaw. It is limited to the width it can cut in vertical because of the saw frame but I haven't really found that to be a problem.
Jim
Reply to
Jim Chandler
The HF saw can be adjusted for straight cuts by adjusting the blade guides. The manual is pretty straight forward.
Jim
Reply to
Jim Chandler
Nah, it's not the same. Harbor Freight's has RED paint. :-) (It's identical except the paint)
Jim
Reply to
Jim Chandler
I almost bought one a few months ago, when it was $150.00 and I had a 15% off coupon.
Now it's at $200.00; I'm hoping it goes on sale soon.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
I should have hung up, gone downstairs and looked before writing that. The blade guide bar is solid, the slot is in the casting. Mine is a Delta and a few parts are different from the HF model. The blade guides can be rotated slightly to square up the blade to the table.
I can get it to cut square within 0.005" per inch vertically but I have to use it where I adjusted it because my basement floor isn't completely flat. Usually I cut a piece at least 1/16" oversize and mill or belt-sand it square.
I've cut steel 1/2" thick and 6" wide, lying flat, with a well-used 10/14TPI blade. Took about half an hour. My saw occasionally jams so I stay near enough to hear it and shut it off.
Your 3/16" triangles shouldn't be a problem as long as the stock will fit flat in the vise. I'd angle the vise and cut one triangle off each end, then square it and cut the next two. If you need more than 4 you can set the vise at 45 and flip the stock over after each cut. Free- hand angles and notches on small pieces are easier and safer if you do them before cutting the piece off the bar.
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
The $150 deal is good. I built a more rigid base for mine. Also added hydraulic downfeed. Ran it daily in my small shop until I bought a 7x10. Somebody will pipe up with the FAQ on these, as they are quite common (as well as the questions).
As always, any piece of equipment from HF needs to be regarded as a partially assembled kit...
Reply to
johnnytorch
It's on sale in my area right now for $150. Just got the flyer yesterday.
Jim
Reply to
Jim Chandler
I just bought this last year for $199.00 and it's great. Much better than the HF unit I used to have. I see they jumped the price up.
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Reply to
syoung
Also -- the blade needs to be tight enough. Basically, as tight "as you can get it" is on the low side of "tight enough". So just grab that tension knob and crank on it. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Does it cut square? Also, would a "portable" metal cutting bandsaw like the Porter Cable at Lowes clamped to a table cut as accurate?
Reply to
stryped
THanks for the head's up, Jim, I'll keep my eye on the mail today.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken

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