Chop saw material support frame

Home shop project of the day....
http://picasaweb.google.com/Curt.Welch/ChopSawMaterialSupportFrame
The wife and kids were out of town so my friend Mike (who I met taking
welding classes) came over and we stayed up to around 2 AM making a simple support frame to hold material as it's being cut in the chop saw. I hope the noise didn't bother the neighbors too much....
I went with a simple square frame design so it's always the right height even if it gets knocked around in use.
I discovered that my new welding table worked real nice as a blackboard for writing out project notes with a sharpie. They clean off nicely when it's all done with acetone. Much easier and better to use than paper around welding projects. (I guess everyone else already knew that trick).
I also figured out I need to add better clamping options on the back of the table. As you can see in the pictures, I used two angle irons in a railroad track type fixture to get the spacing of the frame correct and consistent. But because I couldn't clamp it well enough to the back of the table, I ended up tack welding a few cross plates to the fixture to hold the spacing. Once tack welded, we realized we could use a clamp to squeeze in the sides slightly to fine tune the width. That all worked well, but it still would have been nice to have a strong clamping surface on the back of the table.
I also got the idea to use some anti-splatter spray on the table to help prevent splatter from the tack welding sticking to the table. That too seemed to work well for this type of project where it was being tacked close to the table surface.
--
Curt Welch http://CurtWelch.Com /
snipped-for-privacy@kcwc.com http://NewsReader.Com /
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Curt Welch wrote:

Soapstone works good as well. On clean steel I use a carpenters pencil.

--
Steve W.
Near Cooperstown, New York
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How about a good folding miter saw stand instead? Attach the chop saw and you have rollers for stock, and even an adjustable stop so you can maker multiple cuts the exact same length. I have one under my miter saw now, and plan to pick up another for my chop saw, for the same reasons mentioned by others. My table saw and my radial arm saw are on rollers so I can roll them out the back overhead door and cut outside for the same reason.
With my miter saw I can fold up the legs and stand it in the corner, and easily carry it outside by the handle on the saw. I plan to do the same with my chop saw.

Might try a write erase marker.
Bob La Londe www.YumaBassMan.com
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Curt Welch wrote:

I forget the official name for one of those. It might just be a "cutting stand". Anyone know for sure?
I have a prism-shaped cast iron one which stands on the floor. It has a roller on top which can be raised or lowered with screws. Must weigh at least a hundred pounds.
It's a useful thing to have if you're cutting long, heavy stock.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Two or three years ago, I was cussing and fussing at the person/s who stole my new Makita chop saw. Now I thank them. I went and got a cheapo HF band saw, and now wonder why I ever owned a chop saw rather than wearing out three or four of them over the years. Sparks, dust, fire, noise, hearing damage.
I don't think I'd ever buy another chop saw. I DO know that I would buy a better band saw. You can cut multiple pieces at a time, and miter cuts come out without the blade drift of a chop saw.
And then, there's the fun of blade explosions.
Chop saws work. No doubt. Then you go up to band saws and cold saws.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

I, too, prefer my bandsaw. The only reason I've kept my chop saw is for hard stuff. E.g., bed frames. Bob
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SteveB wrote:

I have a personal preference for power hacksaws. They work better than bandsaws when they're old, and the stiff blade gives a nice, straight cut. If you can live with the fact that they're a little slower than a bandsaw, they're a good choice. Quiet too.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Yeah, part of it is also wanting to learn for myself what all the tools are like and what they are good for and not good for. I really just want to own one of everything! The chop saw seemed like an obvious place to start because it works fine for what I currently need to do.
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I think everyone here has had one at one time or another. It's a good starter and MUCH better than a hacksaw. But you'll find other things and as you say, probably end up with one of everything.
A guy can never have too many tools. Even if they sit in a corner.
Steve
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