Hickeys

Jim Wilkins wrote:


Labeling was no problem, but only being able to pull three wires at a time, instead of 10 meant that it took more than three times as long to make and test the huge harness. I not only labeled each conductor at each end, I covered each label with cleat heatshrink, and tinned the ends.
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On Mon, 31 Oct 2016 18:14:11 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

You COULD have bought more than one roll of each color - this would reduce the time spent = quite possibly enough to pay for any waste wire left over after the job (which could be used on another job, anyway)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: >

No, I couldn't. They only had one roll of each color. They couldn't be bothered to order more. It was interesting that right after I bought the wire and a few other items that a building inspector showed up and tried to shut down the project. He had no idea about industrial electrical work, and he turned pale when I tossed him my copy of the NEC and asked what he knew about the industrial and theatrical areas of the code. He yelled, "I'm going to get a cease and desist order!" as he ran out of the building but he never came back. I guess that the filings with the FCC and FAA construction permits stopped him.
You don't know that area. (Destin/Sandestin, Florida) It is full of expensive condos, and no one wants to sell supplies to anyone except the big contractors who order things in advance. I had a hell of a time finding some 3" copper pipe, and I had ended up buying some materials from a scrapyard that had bought the leftover materials for a canceled nuclear power plant.
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On Mon, 31 Oct 2016 16:36:30 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

I can only imagine.
Did you wear out a number-style label maker? I hated old Mercenary's Bends (IIRC) repairs because of the numbered wires. Man, that was a crispy old memory. Crap like this:
http://www.linkbelt.com/lit/images/products/photogallery/rtc8060/photos/D7-E1_Automotive_Wiring.jpg
Our military used the same method long ago.
And I remember cringing as a kid, when I saw the phone repairman with the big fat bundle of tiny wires all splayed out.
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    [ ... ]

    I remember when I worked at a place which was making flight simulators for the Navy, the cable harnesses had gazillions of 22 ga white wires which were run through a machine which hot-stamped a number every few inches -- and each wire had a different number, which matched numbers in wire lists and on schematics. (Typical connectors were 104 pin rectangular ones with crimp-on pins.) The harness in the cockpit was mostly the same 22 ga wires, in a bundle about 8" diameter.

    But the phone company has a good system for keeping track of the wires. 25 pair per sub-bundle, with each pair being made of a particular pair of colors, and beyond that, a pair of colored thread bundles wrapped around that, to distinguish bundles, following the same color pattern.
    The fun ones were more recent ones which had all the wires embedded in clear silicone grease -- really messy to handle.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 1 Nov 2016 04:11:03 GMT
<snip>

Icky-pick, see:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icky-pick
I was a two-way radio tech. The phone techs I had to work with had their own vocabulary or rather slang. Icky-pick was one of them. Along with dry pair, short, boot, tip, ring... always a lot of fun trying to communicate back in forth in our individual terms ;-)
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wrote:

http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/P/POTS.html
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    Intersting -- and appropriate. :-)
    Apparently, not silicone, so I was wrong there.

    Well ... tip and ring come from the old 3-conductor phone plugs. They were (from end back) tip, ring, and sleeve. On a manual switchboard, sleeve was used to flag a line as busy -- and the operator would hear a loud click when the tip of the phone plug touched the sleeve of the jack, signaling her to not complete the connection (unless a conference call was being set up.)
    The same thing was done with the step-by-step Strowger switch (or Ma Bell called it 10x10) exchanges. There were three wires (within the exchange) associated with each line. Tip and Ring came from the outside on the customer's line, and went to a double-sided bank of contacts swept by a wiper. In parallel with that was a second bank, only single contacts used, swept by another wiper. You pick up your phone, it draws current through a "line relay", closing contacts to call a line finder to connect your phone to the first level of dialing, and it feeds a signal back on the sleeve connection to a cutoff relay which disconnects your line from calling for more equipment until the current call is over. Each digit you dial moves you to another switch, except that the last two digits are handled by a single switch. It feeds voltage to the called party's cut-off relay, and a ring signal to the phone pair (tip and ring). When the called party picks up, DC flows through the line (the ring signal was AC -- most commonly 20 Hz, except for some party lines) and connects the full conversation link until both parties hang up. (Actually -- the calling party hanging up resets everything quickly, the called party is not so quick on these step-by-step exchanges.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

Funny you should say that. I didn't make the cut at the F-14 Simulator shop on NAS Miramar because I didn't have bubble memory experience, having just graduated from Coleman's Computer Electronics Technology course. I'm very glad I didn't make it. <g>

It has to be fun driving after that, too. Silicone is messy and nasty. That was one of the things I hated about the car wash guys using ArmorAll on the _steering_wheels_ before I test drove the repaired cars at the body shop. I asked them if they were trying to drum up new business for the shop.
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    [ ... ]

    This was before bubble memory came (and went). :-) The simulator was for the LTV A7-A -- a carrier based light attack aircraft.
    And I did not have to worry about being stuck with it for long. As soon as it was accepted by the Navy, it would get shipped off to wherever they wanted it, and we were done with it.

    [ ... ]

    I'll bet.

    We used to use it to insulate some HV trigger coils for flash lamps in lasers. I hated to work with that, too. I never did find a way to clean it off quickly and easily.

    Who would have paid for the repairs after that? (You-- or was it that the owners would not be expecting the slick steering wheel? :-)
    I didn't know what ArmorAll was a silicone oil/grease.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

You find out real quick when you try to paint something that has had ArmorAll sprayed on or near it. The fish-eyes never end!!!!
Of the ArmorAll products only Natural Finish Detailer Protectant is silicone free
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On Wed, 02 Nov 2016 22:46:28 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The shop, once the owners sued. One idiot put it on the brake pedal, too. Talk about fun!

The painter refused to let the car wash idiots anywhere near the paint shop. And the only fix for fish-eyes in paint is to add silicone to IT before spraying. Nasty, nasty, nasty.
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wrote:

That was the only instance I heard of bubble memory to this day. It didn't exist in the real world. ;)

Nor did I.

Thread drift. I expanded the thread to include all silicones since I haven't worked that much with the com cable goo. I did work with automotive silicone dielectric goo products. Another nasty product is the heatsink goo for CPUs.
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    [ ... ]

    I actually *had* a bubble memory for a while. I picked it up at a hamfest, planning to find some use for it -- but before that happened, I encountered someone desperately looking for one of the same type to repair something -- so I sold it.
    I had read about it before, and thought that it sounded interesting.
    [ ... ]

    Thread drift is common enough here. At least this did not drift in a political direction. :-)

    Not just for CPUs, but for *any* power semiconductor device. (There are actually goo-free heat-sink pads used in some CPUs, including some that Sun made.) A silicone rubber pad with a lot of embedded silver to conduct the heat well.
    The old white goo has something in it which I suspect to be beryllium based -- nasty stuff without the silicone grease to keep it from blowing around. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote: >

We had a Texas Instruments IBM clone with bubble memory for billing at the Cincinnati, Ohio 'United Video' CATV front office. It was supplied by the data processing supplier. More than once, it was dead when we started the day's business. Their service tech would have to come out, and reload the operating system into the bubble memory, so I have no love for the stuff. That replaced an older, NCR terminal with a tape drive where the payments were entered, and transmitted at the end of the day.
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On 3 Nov 2016 01:18:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
Years ago was between real jobs and had the misfortune to be working in construction. Large remodel job that lasted for months, full basement finish with wet bar, huge deck, new sunroom and fire place... One day large white spots and foot prints suddenly appeared in his concrete driveway. The sunroom and fireplace were both in progress at the time and the home owner blamed our stucco sub contractors. Partially based on the size of the foot prints, "They must have spilled acid or something!"
Turns out it was his car detailers had spilled a whole bottle of ArmorAll in the driveway. I occasionally did 'handyman' type work for him for several years afterwards and even after several pressure washings and applications of sealer the white spots were still visible.
Silicone can be nasty stuff.
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William

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Larry Jaques wrote:

I used the Brady printed labels, and covered them with clear heat shrink.

The new FAA building at Ft Rucker, Al. had a phone room on each floor, with 1200 pairs, and walls covered with 66 blocks. That was over 40 years ago. 20 years later, they would have needed under 100 pair, each with a SLIC for up to 16 lines.
The color coding was easy to learn. I repaired a lot of 1A2 phone systems. I still have a few hundred feet of 25 pair cable, somewhere around here. :)
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When I made cable harnesses for the batch of electric cars [the customer] paid to have us label each wire with printed heatshrink labels: https://www.brother-usa.com/mobile/lp/ptedge/ptedge_cable_wire.aspx
I've used a fine Sharpie on paper labels for home projects but the writing diffuses and fades under clear adhesive tape.
--jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

I switched to clear heatshrink, before the mid '80s. I was using it on my shop cables, to stop people from claiming that they had brought cables with equipment, when they didn't. I would type on address labels, then trim and wrap them on the cable before applying the heatshrink tubing. The labels had a description, and the date that they were made.
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Clear heatshrink is fine when you are making the cable but not so easy afterward, or to add to commercial cables with molded connectors.
I've used these but they snag and not everyone can do draftsman-quality lettering. http://www.tiewraps.com/idtagtw_flag_page.html
--jsw
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