how to remove arbor from nichols mill? (newbie question)

i don't post much, but i've learned a ton from this list. so, here goes-
just got a nichols (semi-automatic converted back to run via hand
feed) set-up in the shop, and it works beautifully.
i'm turning it into a dedicated tube mitering (aka fishmouthing / coping) machine, and as such i'd like to remove the arbor from the spindle in order to run holesaws.
so i'm a total newbie at this; the nichols is my first real machine tool, and returning it to hand feed was basically the first real work i've done on any machine other than basic operations on a south bend model a and a few swipes on a bridgeport.
how the heck do i get the arbor out?
i took the whole overarm assembly off, knocked out the dowel pin that runs through the arbor, and removed the two hex cap screws that are on the piece immediately next to the arbor (the arbor runs through this piece into the head). i thought maybe the arbor would just slide out, but it definitely did not.
can anybody offer any explanations? as detailed as possible, as again i'm a total greenhorn.
i've searched the archives, but couldn't find anything that directly helped me out.
thanks, dan.
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    [ ... ]

    Congratulations!
    [ ... ]

    You're working on the wrong end of the spindle. The arbor is held in by a drawbar from the other end of the spindle. Look in the center of the pulley. It may be a cylinder with a pair of flats milled to fit a wrench, or it may be a hex nut. In any case, put a wrench on that, loosen it by about 1/2 to one full turn, and then tap the end of the drawbar with a dead-blow hammer once or twice, which should free the arbor. Then grip the arbor and loosen the drawbar until the arbor comes free.
    The two cap screws in the end of the spindle are to simply keep the arbor from spinning before you get the drawbar tight enough. The cross-bar (dowel pin) which you removed engages the heads of the hex screws, and should stay in the arbor all the time. I presume that you found the setscrew which held it centered?
    Note that many 40 taper tool holders will have a flange with a pair of notches which straddle the hex head screws. The dowel pin is unique to the genuine Nichols arbors.
    You'll have to find one of these appropriate to holding your fishmouthing saws.
    You do need to at least loosen the overarm and slide and rotate the arm with the bearing enough to allow the arbor to pull out.

    The drawbar is common to almost all milling spindles, except those with built-in quick-change systems.
    Do you have a manual for the Nichols mill? If not, drop me an e-mail.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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thanks so much don. i just downloaded a manual from your website, which i printed out earlier today at work (lucky me to be able to have a hard copy of it).
On Sep 13, 10:49 pm, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in article

If you have a milling machine, why not simply find the correct-size roughing mill and use it to fishmouth tubing?
I use a 1-3/4" roughing mill to fishmouth all my rollcage stuff on an Enco mill-drill.
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