Hydraulic press help

I'm shopping for a hydraulic press. The prices are all over the map.

I know that the components, the type of steel, and various other obvious differences can affect the price.

Questions: Do these usually come with any accessories? Or are they extra?

Is air powered better than hand powered?

Do I really need a XX ton when an X ton would do? What's the smallest size YOU would buy and why? I like to buy slightly larger than I think I'll need for that once in a while situation, but don't need a huge one if an average one will do it.

What are some good brands of oldies in case I can find one locally through Craigslist or my local Tradio program?

What should I pay for new and used?

Thanks in advance

Steve

Reply to
SteveB
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Reply to
E. Walter Le Roy

Your benchmark is a 12 ton import special press, can be had for a bit over $100 similar to

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come with the notched plates that let you press bearings.

A 20 ton unit runs a bit over $200.

After that you have to ask what you want the press for? Bigger parts (tractor, large trucks) will require a bigger press. Air over is nice if you have some repetitive parts. You can buy or build some bending jigs that work ok (but not as good as a real press brake) There are some cutting/notchers if you want to spend serious $$$

Used > I'm shopping for a hydraulic press. The prices are all over the map. >

Reply to
RoyJ

Used, maybe. New ones rarely. Sorta like machine tools

For repetitive things, yes. For me, I can better gauge the force I'm using when I'm pumping a hand jack.

20 ton seems to work for all my purposes, up to 1 ton truck repairs, axles etc.

US made? OTC is the best I know of, also Hein Werner, Walker.

Hard to go wrong with the ubiquitous Harbor Freight 20-ton. Mine is about 8 years old, seldom used, but it works like a champ.

The only thing I have added is two sizes of bearing splitters. I also keep various sizes of scrap "round things" for fixturing. Cheap large sockets are useful.

I keep a couple of large brake drums for a scattershield. If something makes me nervous, I stop and drop one of those over the work, then reapply pressure.

Reply to
Rex

I'd go with the 20 ton HF air-over and put casters on it. You don't always need 20 tons, but once in a while----- and the price isn't that much different. Often at HF, the 12 ton air-over jack costs more than the 20 ton does. I added foot controls to mine. See

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The air-over jack still allows fine tuning and "feel" by the hand lever. One of the best buys in the shop. As another poster said, I've had mine for 5 or 10 years and no problems.

Pete Stanaitis

SteveB wrote:

Reply to
spaco

Went to Northern Tools, and various other sites today and looked. But for what I do, I think a HF cheapo will do just fine. IIRC, the bottle jack just sits in there, and if it dies, one just replaces it with another. Should be able to get by for under $200 easily.

Right now, I need to get four lugs pressed into an axle, and I know they'll want around $50 to do it. There's been other times when I've needed a press, so I guess it's time to get one.

Yeah, right. Like I ever needed a "reason" to buy a new tool ................... ;-)

Steve

Reply to
SteveB

Tried that and with a cheater pipe, too. But I was at the point where I knew a "boink!" was close at hand.

Friggin lugs and nuts for that Honda are $12 for the two pieces. I don't want to screw them up.

Steve

Reply to
SteveB

On Fri, 29 Jun 2007 19:59:48 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, JR North quickly quoth:

That (I could only find their 10T model) looks like a handy little bugger. I'll have to fab one up for my 4T portapower.

------------------------------------------------------ No matter how hard you try, you cannot baptize a cat. ----------------------------

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Comprehensive Website Development ---------------------------------------------------

Reply to
Larry Jaques

On Fri, 29 Jun 2007 23:50:17 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, "SteveB" quickly quoth:

2 tips: Lube the threads/washers before assembly, and use an impact wrench to pull it in. The rotary hammering causes the vibration necessary to wiggle the lug into the pressfit.

OK, 3: buy a standard, flat-bottomed nut for pulling the lugs in. Don't try to pull one with a tapered seat. It's self-defeating.

Reply to
Larry Jaques

This is a made to order excuse to buy a tool. I'll never say anything about the other $150. If you have a vehical with FrWD, you will need a press to change out the sealed bearings in the knuckle soon anyway.

Wes

Reply to
Wes

I have smacked lugs in with a BFH plenty if times. Just support the flange well so you don't bend it, which can happen using a press too.

But, my guess is you are looking for an excuse to buy a new tool! Go with a

20 ton HF, Northern Tools, or something similar. Greg
Reply to
Greg O

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Dweller in the cellar

Larry Jaques wrote:

Reply to
JR North

topposting corrected

On Sat, 30 Jun 2007 08:09:01 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, JR North quickly quoth:

Not a bad price. Thanks for the link, but I'll still probably fab one up myself.

- Metaphors Be With You -

Reply to
Larry Jaques

On Sat, 30 Jun 2007 08:09:01 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, JR North quickly quoth:

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Chinese exaltation of the Thai translation of the Japanese expression of the dyslexic model of the English intent.

Reply to
Larry Jaques

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