Little Bigger Small Plastic Injection Machine

The LNS injector is kind of a cleaned up Gingery style machine, but with its own table and press mechanism instead of borrowing those features from a
drill press. I have an LNS injector and it works just fine. Its slow producing maybe 2-3 parts per minute (with a single cavity mold) until a mold gets to hot, but it works and I have found it more than adequate for testing purposes... until now when I need to test some bigger cavities.
Other than making one (which I could do if I had the time) is there a similar semi-commercial product out there with just a little bit more capacity?
What's a good first step for a small proper injection machine. Something with a semi automated process that has a few second cycle time with a liquid cooled mold instead of half a minute? Not a big machine. More along the lines of the smallest commercial plastic injection machines.
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On Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at 10:57:26 AM UTC-5, Bob La Londe wrote:

its

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I haven't seen one of these for years, but there used to be small machines that duplicated injection molding, with a piston feed but without a screw, that was made for schools and testing labs. My uncle's shop in the Perth Am boy high school would emulate injection molding or transfer molding, and it did a very credible job.
Try Googling. Good luck.
--
Ed Huntress

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"Gunner Asch" wrote in message wrote:

How about locating a small commercial plastic injection machine?
Have Iggy find you one. Check ebay and craigslist and the online machine broker ads. They cant be very expensive.
GUnner
******************* That's certainly an option. If I wanted to be in the plastic injection business I've actually located a few machines that would be suitable for small and medium scale production. I just want enough to test a cavity or two, and pass the mold on to the customer. Usually I do molds for stuff that is cast or low pressure injected with an injector that looks like a giant syringe. The few thermo plastic molds I've done have been easily tested with the 1.1 cubic inch capacity of my little desktop LNS machine. The commercial machines I've found would take up way to much real estate in my shop. I have a machine room that's to small already. My big mill and big lathe already sit out on the un-airconditioned shop floor. Makes them pretty miserable to use on a hot summer day. The back is a fabriction area with welding table, 48" finger brake (2200 lbs) assembly benches drill presses (4 of them), grinders, mill drill, and misc other stuff. I suppose if I parked my boats outside I'd have plenty of room, but my boats were the first consideration when I built the shop. I also have a full tackle making area I use to test every resin, lead casting, low pressure plastisol, and thermo plastic mold before it leaves my shop. It doesn't get used constantly, but it requires every square inch of space it takes up.
In this case I am guessing about 2.5-3 CI for this mold for a customer. (Its tricky to model) I've been to his shop and its nicely laid out with a little room to spare, but he doesn't have room for a full on commercial machine like I am finding either. He's not opposed to spending a few dollars (he's paying me afterall), and I have found a few machines at reasonable prices if they work. The problem is space, and maybe electrical budget. Not cost of electricity, but the current capacity of the existing service.
I can plunger cast the mold with resin and a resin release agent for crude testing, but resin flows easier than thermo plastic so its not a "good" test. I still need to be able to do proper testing and of course I want my customers to be successful with their projects. If they make money they come back and spend more money.
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Of course the best test is with thermoplastic, but until then can you come up with a simple recipe adding a thickener like silica to the resin to get the viscosity to be a better match?
Any hobby injection molders in your area you could just visit and rent time on their toy, err, machine :-), for mold testing? Maybe you could be their excuse to step up their equipment to whatever shot size you need?
--
Regards,
Carl Ijames
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"Carl" wrote in message

Of course the best test is with thermoplastic, but until then can you come up with a simple recipe adding a thickener like silica to the resin to get the viscosity to be a better match?
********************* That's certainly a good option. Most of the resins I use have such short pot life that I'd have to take some care about my order of steps. Of course I could shop around for some longer pot life resins.
Any hobby injection molders in your area you could just visit and rent time on their toy, err, machine :-), for mold testing? Maybe you could be their excuse to step up their equipment to whatever shot size you need?
********************** Well, I do already have a "toy" myself. I can ask around on Facebook. Can't hurt to check my options. There's always the chance somebody local has a little bigger toy.
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Bob La Londe wrote:

By resin I assumed you meant a two-part resin-hardener system, and further assumed that you could pre-mix the thickener into the resin with no time constraint before adding the hardener. Course, you know all about ASSuming :-). Just a suggestion.
No disrespect intended by "toy", just following the "hobby" theme as opposed to a full time commercial shop. Even if you don't find a suitable local machine you can get time on, maybe you can get some new customers for molds or general machining if they have needs they can't handle themselves.
--
Regards,
Carl Ijames
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On 12/6/2018 12:16 PM, Carl wrote: > Bob La Londe wrote: >> "Carl" wrote in message >> >>> "Bob La Londe" >>> wrote: >>> >>> I can plunger cast the mold with resin and a resin release agent for crude testing, but resin flows easier than thermo plastic so its not a "good" test. I still need to be able to do proper testing and of course I want my customers to be successful with their projects. If they make money they come back and spend more money. >> >> Of course the best test is with thermoplastic, but until then can you come >> up with a simple recipe adding a thickener like silica to the resin to get >> the viscosity to be a better match? >> >> ********************* >> That's certainly a good option. Most of the resins I use have such short pot life that I'd have to take some care about my order of steps. Of course I could shop around for some longer pot life resins. >> >> >> Any hobby injection molders in your area you could just visit and rent time >> on their toy, err, machine , for mold testing? Maybe you could be their >> excuse to step up their equipment to whatever shot size you need? >> >> ********************** >> Well, I do already have a "toy" myself. I can ask around on Facebook. Can't hurt to check my options. There's always the chance somebody local has a little bigger toy. > > By resin I assumed you meant a two-part resin-hardener system, and further assumed that you could pre-mix the thickener into the resin with no time constraint before adding the hardener. Course, you know all about ASSuming . Just a suggestion. > > No disrespect intended by "toy", just following the "hobby" theme as opposed to a full time commercial shop. Even if you don't find a suitable local machine you can get time on, maybe you can get some new customers for molds or general machining if they have needs they can't handle themselves. >
No offense taken. Just illustrating that your ASSumptions were correct. LOL
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"Gunner Asch" wrote in message

Ill see if I can find out if Tha Ngyuen is still around. He had several of these:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Morgan-Industries-Plastic-Injection-Molding-Machine-4-oz-G-100T-Bench-Top-120V/223237163528
Will this do the job for you? Small foot print, small power requirements, big load capacity..
If so...I probably can get one VERY cheap for you.
Gunner
*****************
A machine like that would fit right at the end of the bench for my tackle making area. I don't think it would cost me any significant real estate on the shop floor. The passage between the bench and the bench on the wall there is over 6 feet so it would basically use unused space. I could still use the LNS machine for small capacity molds, but 6.0 CI is significant volume. You can do a lot with that much volume. I already have air and power over there, although I'd probably run a new dedicated circuit for it. For me price is the issue, but that would be a really respectable machine in a small footprint. I can even see where one would fit in my customer's shop.
Let me know what you have.
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wrote:

About 8 to 10 years ago someone here had a smallish injection machine for sale. (Think it was Gunner or perhaps Iggy?) Had the plant manager at my then work interested. We were going to use just the extruder to re-process our scrap in house rather than sending it out. Already had a granulator and a pulverizor so we were 2/3rds there. Could not justify the downtime switching the puvlerisor back and forth from virgin to regrind so it never happened.
Before roto molding with its powdered plastic I worked at Evenflo as an extrusion blow molding operator. Think you are a bit optimistic on cycle times. None of the ~12 injection machines there was faster than the 3 extrusion machines I ran. 20 seconds was very fast at that end of the plant with some large parts around one minute. One of my machines ran 8 to 12 seconds depending on the size of the bottle (4 verses 8 OZ) Of course the injection molds typically had more cavities, some of the smaller parts as many as 48.
We had both 'tower' (fan cooled) and chilled water at most machines and a few of the more elaborate injection molds had their own thermolator that could cool (or heat if necessary) individual areas of a mold.
--
William

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