Logan Lathe Model 200

Found a nice little Logan Model 200 10"x24" Lathe at an estate sale last
weekend. No quick change but 3 and 4 jaw chucks, little wear on the
ways. A bit of a grunt to get it out of the basement where it had been
residing for 40+ years but I got it home.
The bad news: main spnindle bearing is toast. I have the spindle
assembly out on the bench, not quite sure how to seperate the bearing
from the spindle. Looks like there is a threaded on locking collar, this
sure looks like a good place to put in a left handed thread to mess up
the next guy who looks at it.
Anyone with info? Manual? Parts? Cost for the bearing? The bearing
looks like it is probably a standard 72x35mm double row ball bearing but
it has a snap ring grove around the outside. Any reason I can't just get
a stock bearing??
My return e-mail is munged after the Sven virus dumped 4mb of trash per
hour so best to respond here.
Cheers.
Reply to
RoyJ
Loading thread data ...
Google Logan lathe They have the manual and the parts.
Reply to
Jim
I looked at one of those, the guy was wanting $150 for the lathe, no jack shaft but the rest was there. Where are you located??
Reply to
Waynemak
Anyone with info? Manual? Parts? Cost for the bearing? The bearing looks like it is probably a standard 72x35mm double row ball bearing but it has a snap ring grove around the outside.
Get a manual from Logan Actuator.
Spindle bearings may be a problem, and some of the usual manufacturers have changed widths and other specs on Logan, from what they used to buy.
One owner resorted to grinding the snap ring groove himself.
Where there's a will, there's a way.
Reply to
Peter H.
I think it is a "208". I think you can get a "208" bearing with a snapring on it at your local auto parts store. Those bearings were standard/common. Measure ID, OD and thickness and match it up. Paul
Reply to
6e70
If its a 208 bearing, I should have new ones from a screw machine service shop. Let me know.
Reply to
Waynemak
Located in the Twin Cities area of Minesota.
I paid $300 for mine, seemed to be a reasonable price given the low wear and that it had all the parts that tend to go AWOL (chucks, dogs, holders, and change gears.) Runs nicely except for the distinct howl from the headstock bearking.
Rethinking that a bit since the Logan site lists a couple of different part numbers at $130 each. Ouch. I'll just bite the bullet and get one from Logan if I can't cross match it at my favorite bearing house. I've got several large bearing distributors here in town, they have worked small miricles in the past.
Waynemak wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I'm guessing it is a "207" bearing, still haven't gotten the retainer off to be sure. It's soaking in PB Blaster as I type. Anyone know if that is a left handed thread on the retainer???
6e70 wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Got it apart, it's a New Deprture 5207 207 size, retainer ring makes it a 5xxx. Chew marks on the retainer ring slot says it's probably not original.
RoyJ wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
The 52xx makes it a double row angular contact bearing. NTN, NSK and SKF denote the snap ring with an NR suffix. Motion Industries lists a few 5207NR, but shows no stock. OEM price ranges from around $27 to $40.
Note that these are *not* precision bearings, but my experience is that these days standard ABEC1 bearings are usually much better than ABEC1 specs. There will be some axial freeplay, .0004 to .0011", in the standard 5207. Is it possible someone replaced a preloaded pair with the double row bearing, or is there another bearing on the spindle that provides the preload?
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Thanks for the update on the part number, makes it much easier to call around and see what's out there.
Preload is on the small end of the spindle. I can't imagine that the original unit would have used precision bearings. You're right, modern low end bearings are way better than they were back a few years. Even the Chinese import specials are getting pretty decent.
I'll call around on Friday (if anyone is open) or Monday and see what is in stock and prices. I get a small discount so I'm figuring about $50 based on what I've paid for similar ones.
I tossed the old one in some laquer thinner to clean it up enough to have it in hand when I go shopping. As soon as the solvent broke through the dried grease on the reatainers, the thing spins smooth as silk. If worse comes to worse, I'll just repack it and shove it back in. Now that I've had it apart once, it just isn't that big a deal to tear it down.
Ned Simm> >
Reply to
RoyJ
The 52xx makes it a double row angular contact bearing. NTN, NSK and SKF denote the snap ring with an NR suffix. Motion Industries lists a few 5207NR, but shows no stock. OEM price ranges from around $27 to $40.
Note that these are *not* precision bearings, but my experience is that these days standard ABEC1 bearings are usually much better than ABEC1 specs ...
Yes ... about equal to older stock ABEC 3 or 5.
Logan made its machines with, variously, ABEC 3 and ABEC 7.
The ABEC 7 bearings run about a grand a set.
The ABEC 3 bearings are ... er ... considerably cheaper.
Reply to
Peter H.
|| ||>> ||The 52xx makes it a double row angular contact bearing. NTN, NSK and SKF denote ||the snap ring with an NR suffix. Motion Industries lists a few 5207NR, but ||shows no stock. OEM price ranges from around $27 to $40. || ||Note that these are *not* precision bearings, but my experience is that these ||days standard ABEC1 bearings are usually much better than ABEC1 specs ... ||>> || ||Yes ... about equal to older stock ABEC 3 or 5. || ||Logan made its machines with, variously, ABEC 3 and ABEC 7. || ||The ABEC 7 bearings run about a grand a set. || ||The ABEC 3 bearings are ... er ... considerably cheaper.
There was a lot of static on this subject. on the Lathe_list Yahoo forum, which is devoted to Logan Lathe users and moderated by Scott Logan. It is a valuable source of information. Basically, Scott indicated he was having trouble getting the high-precision bearings originally spec'd, but was able to source bearings from Timken which were labeled as normal production but which meet the tolerances originally specified for the Logans.
In Timken or BCA that bearing number would be 207L (with snapring) or LO (without snapring, but grooved). Or 208L, 208LO. $25 - $30 should cover it at an auto parts store.
Texas Parts Guy
Reply to
rex
Installed the new bearing, much quieter.
Peter H. wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Installed the new bearing, much quieter.
Which specific one did you select, and did you also change the rear bearing?
Reply to
Peter H.
5207NRZZ from SNR made in Germany. Didn't pull the other end, probably should have, not a big deal to change it out later. Rest of the machine is a bit loose (3 jaw is a beater), I'll deal with that first. I'm not trying for toolroom quality here!
I have full access to a Hardige with full set of collets by 1/64 for precison and a 15" Enterprise for heavy work so the Logan is pretty much for quick projects.
Peter H. wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I have full access to a Hardige with full set of collets by 1/64 for precison and a 15" Enterprise for heavy work so the Logan is pretty much for quick projects.
Agree with you there.
I also have two Monarchs and a Hardinge, and my Logan 820 is my only English-metric machine.
Not that the Logan's strong suit is threading.
Reply to
Peter H.
Just went the head on my 200. Got both bearings at a local supplier.
Reply to
Ronloganlathe2
First : You're replying to a 12 year old message . Second : Unless you've purchased the high precision type of bearing (ABEC 7 IIRC) that the lathe originally came with you're pissin' directly upwind . Slop equals chatter , and you'll have plenty of both if you bought common off-the-shelf bearings. Third : There is a Yahoo group devoted to the Logan and PowrKraft lathes . You should probably join .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Maybe. The manufacturers of bearings keep improving. As I understand it they make a bunch of hearings and then grade them. With improved methods they end up with more abec 7 bearings than they sell, so sell some of them as 5 abec.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster

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