thoughts on Logan lathes?

I looked at an 11" Logan floor model lathe today. My normal lathe is a 9" South
Bend. In some ways I was surprised that the Logan didn't look that much beefier
than my SB. I may have an opportunity to acquire this machine, and there are a
few things I like about it better than my South Bend - larger spindle bore, much

longer tailstock ram travel, 16 speeds vs. 12, V belt vs. flat.
I'm curious if anyone has any particular input about the 11" Logans. No steady
or follower, probably hard to find.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
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I liked my 10" Logan quite a bit (this is a machine comparable to your 9" SB). Logans are nice lathes. A larger spindle bore is extremely useful, as you no doubt have many examples of.
Logan is still in business selling parts for their lathes. Scott Logan is a contributor on this newsgroup, though I haven't noticed him lately. I'd think you could find accessories, lots of Logans out there.
Steve
Grant Erw> I looked at an 11" Logan floor model lathe today. My normal lathe is a
Reply to
Steve Smith
I like my 10" a lot . Has all the precision I can use ... but then I'm not a machinist .
Reply to
Snag
I may be a bit biased, so I won't comment. Oh, what the heck, sure I will...
Comparison from old sales literature. These are comparisons on the 10" Logan, and mentioned elsewhere, the 11" has a larger spindle bore, and is available with a longer bed. I believe the "Competitor" is the South Bend 9". And for the record, I'm not saying there is anything wrong with the South Bend, it is a very good lathe.
Logan Competitor Swing over bed 10-1/2" 9-1/4" Swing over Saddle 6-1/8" 5-1/2" Between Centers 24" 22" Power Feed Reverses Wrenches required w/ a self clamping No positive stop position lever Threads 46, 4-216 45, 4-160 Face width of 7/16" 3/8" Change Gears Bed width 6-15/16" 5-15/16" Bed Length 43-1/8" 42" Ways 2V & 2 Flat 3V & 1 Flat Spindle mounted on Spindle mounted on Ball Bearings Cast Iron Bearing w/ Pinch adjustment Hole through spindle 25/32" 3/4" Face Plate Dia 6" 5-1/8" Spindle Speeds 12, 30-1450 12, 41-1270 Back Gears enclosed Back Gears and control in headstock w/ control in back of headstock in front of headstock Reversing Switch Switch or Motor Control included in price extra charge Cross Slide Travel 6-1/4" 5-7/8" Cross Slide Screw has Screw has steel to steel self-lubricating bearing w/oil hole bearing Tailstock Spindle 2-3/8" 2-1/8" Travel Countershaft Improved, patented Standard countershaft Logan design Threading Dial Furnished Not furnished, extra cost Motor 1/2 HP 1/3 or 1/2 HP Shipping Weight 400 lbs 370 lbs
Not really. Stock items here, and also often found from used machinery dealers or eBay.
Reply to
Scott S. Logan
Grant..in my opinon..shrug..the Logan 11 is twice the machine as a SB 9.
Beefier, stronger, more versitile. I like them.
Gunner
"If I'm going to reach out to the the Democrats then I need a third hand.There's no way I'm letting go of my wallet or my gun while they're around."
"Democrat. In the dictionary it's right after demobilize and right before demode` (out of fashion). -Buddy Jordan 2001
Reply to
Gunner
:^) :^)
Snip comparisons...
If I understand it correctly, the logan 10" is analogous to the SB 9" machine.
And the 10L SB equates to the (larger?) 11 Logan. Both are 5C capable machines.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
I'm fond of my quaint specimen, a Logan model 1957, which is 11x36, but since getting a (shudder) modern Chinese 12x36, I am loathe to admit that I don't use the Logan that much.
Make sure that you check not only the bed wear, but things like the spindle bearings that should be smooth and have no play. You can have a pristine bed on an old machine but be stuck with brinneled bearings.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Well, wouldn't you just then replace the spindle bearings?
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
I thought somebody here went through that in the past - wasn't there a problem getting the special bearings, they were a bit tricky to set up I thought.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Standard quality double row ball bearing runs over $50, the next level up is in the $150 range. Changeout is a half hour job.
Grant Erw>
Reply to
RoyJ
Actually, more like the "10-K", but that is very similar to the 9".
Yes, probably a fair comparison.
Reply to
Scott S. Logan
That's a happy prospect. Where would one find the procedure, parts specifications, and sources for parts?
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
I'd call Scott Logan if I needed procedure or specs, and a bearing house once I had the specs.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
once you buy the lathe, you send some money to Scott Logan and you get a manual and parts list by return mail. That answers the procedure part. You will also get a price list that may include the bearings. A good bearing supply house can be very helpful in providing bearins as well
Reply to
Bill
Good Morning Grant I have an 11" mod 922, built in 1952. I'm not doing production work but for what I do it is a joy to use. Mine is not a floor mod, has a tray and legs, so the motor is behind the headstock not below. The larger spindle bore is great. The 5C collets, as you know, make life easier . If the one you're looking at isn't badly worn I think you'll like it. FWIW I paid around $1100 for mine with a nice set of tooling. If you can get the serial number (usually stamped on the bed, tailstock end, between the flat and the 'V') you can determine it's age on
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. Hope this helps. Bob rgentry_at_oz_dot_net _AT_ = @, _dot_ = . to eMail
Reply to
Bob Gentry
That's the problem. It's a model 1922, legs, tray etc. I offered around what you said but they are in love with the thing and want quite a bit more. Hadda pass, but they did say if nobody bit after a couple weeks they'd call.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin

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