looking for putty-like stuff that cures

I am finishing a car that uses floorpans that have grooves in them (stiffening).
Lots of grooves, different lengths, sizes, orientations.
I want a flat(-ish) floor.
Is there stuff that comes like putty that I could fill the grooves with, something that will cure to a slightly flexible consistency?
I'm hoping to get a can of this magic stuff, smear it in, wait for cure, and run a bead of glue down each strip, nice flat underlay on top of that.
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On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 7:13:44 AM UTC-4, unk wrote:

Bondo
Dan
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I presume you use the phrase "finishing a car" with some liberty!
If you don't know about Bondo (and/or other polyester body putty), then the words carry somewhat less meaning than they might, otherwise.
LLoyd
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On Sun, 29 May 2016 07:34:48 -0500, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Everybody knows about bondo.
I want something
a) more flexible and stronger so I can
b) glue it to the bottom of the underlay, whaich can then be removed for cleaning/drying/other maintenance.
But since I posted, have found out about and decided to test a diy sugru recipe; could be just the thing.
The thing about finishing is it is like Zenos paradox, you never seem to get to the end.
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Just how much is that floorboard going to flex? Bondo should be perfect, especially with an overlay to stiffen it. Being a polyester resin, it flexes pretty well, too. <shrug>

Let us know how it works. It sounds promising.

Remember, Grasshopper, a project is done when you say it is done. Ask any artist/painter.
--
H.L. Mencken wrote in the American Mercury, April 1924, that the aim
of public education is not to fill the young of the species with
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On Sun, 29 May 2016 11:12:30 -0700, Larry Jaques

Make a rod of it, say 1/2" diameter and 8 inches long. Let it cure. Now bend it with your fingers.
Snap.
Polyester can be moderately flexible, but not when you load it with calcium carbonate and other crap to make a filler, like Bondo.

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On Sun, 29 May 2016 14:39:24 -0400, Ed Huntress

I agree. Bondo would be far from perfect for the job.
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On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 2:39:42 PM UTC-4, Ed Huntress wrote:

I think Bondo wousld work. The floorboard in question is corrugated to s tiffen it. I doubt if one could bend the floorboard. But the original po ster wants a more flexible agent. Incidentally can you still buy Bondo wi th Calcium Carbonate? I thought it was all loaded with glass micro-bubbles now.
Dan
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On Sun, 29 May 2016 16:20:24 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

Yes, but what I want is to be able to take the underlay with fill-strips off as one piece. It'll HAVE to be flexible.
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Any specific reason for doing it that (the hard) way?
--
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of public education is not to fill the young of the species with
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On Sun, 29 May 2016 16:20:24 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

If I'm reading it right, he wants to be able to bend the underlayment.

I don't know about the calcium carbonate. I haven't bought the stuff for 15 or 20 years.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 8:41:22 AM UTC-4, unk wrote:

Please report back on the DIY sugru results. That stuff is too handy and too expensive.
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On Sun, 29 May 2016 14:53:34 -0700, rangerssuck wrote:

It's just silicone 1 with about 10-30% cornstarch mixed in, to speed up the cure.
Which is does, but it's way too damm sticky until it does cure. It does peel away from the foil backing on the sound-absorber stuff I put all over the floor, so that's a good point (means the underlay could be glued to the strips and the whole thing lifted off, assuming I don't get any glue where I shouldn't have.
Also it looks as though I would need about 20 tubes (calking gun tubes) of the silicone. That's a LOT of very sticky messy stuff.
So if there was a caulk that was not so messy, would NOT bond to shiny aluminum foil, and would stay somewhat flexible, and could be glued...
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wrote:

Try it on your mouth and then report back.
Once again, the amazing Wieber is incompetently pretending to know what he's talking about.
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On Sun, 29 May 2016 11:13:37 +0000 (UTC)

There are oodles of different caulks nowadays. Go to your local home supply store and start reading what they say on the tubes. Or better yet just google them.
Off the top of my head you might try Polyurethane. It sets up kind of slow but works pretty good as both glue and filler. Commonly used in the roofing trade:
http://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/premium-polyurethane-construction-adhesive-sealant/
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 9:06:45 AM UTC-4, Leon Fisk wrote:

There's also body putty.
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Mix up a small batch of silicone caulking and corn starch 1 to 1. It's a pain to mix at first, so do it in tall-sided container. For a sample batch the lid off a spray bomb will do nicely. The corn starch absorbs moisture from the air which makes the silicone dry in minutes, firm but flexible. Cheap and handy for many things. Haven't tried gluing it to anything but I expect it will be Ok.
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On Sun, 29 May 2016 09:00:49 -0700, Christmas Card From a Hooker in

No matter what he uses, the OP is going to have to use a release agent of some kind. Silicone is a terrible adhesive, but even that will stick in the grooves -- at least partly -- through some mechanical interlocking. The texture of that may even be too fine to see with the naked eye.
And no adhesive we're likely to encounter will stick to it very well, either, so running a bead of glue and then sticking on the underlay probably will create a mess.
As for flexibility, bondo doesn't have it. It's weak, it gets lousy adhesion, it will crumble if you flex it much, and, to get any adhestive to stick to it, you have to wash the top of the beads very well with acetone. Styrene floats to the top and has to be washed off. Sanding just spreads the styrene around, unless you used the acetone first.
I would try this: Get some polyvinyl alcohol release agent (PVA), which you can get at any boating supply store, and brush at least two layers into the gooves -- and on the flat spaces between the grooves. Lay in a bead of "zero shrink" (if you can find it) polyurethane adhesive. (The more expensive brands of polyurethane construction adhesive usually are low-shrink. They'll be *slightly* flexible after being cured.) Immediately lay the underlayment on top of it while it's still wet. Pray a lot. Let it cure really well Then try peeling it up.
It should come up if you don't have a lot of mechanical interlock. If you can spare a couple of days for a test, try it with a piece of underlayment around 6 inches square, first.
--
Ed Huntress



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On Sun, 29 May 2016 12:22:17 -0400, Ed Huntress

I would sink cling wrap into the groove, and tape it down on both sides. I know that will work because I sunk cling wrap into my ear, and then kneaded in that silicone/corn starch putty. Once it set up, it came right out. No, I did not make that up. :) I only did one ear at a time, so that in the worst case I could extract the plug with an easy-out connected to a slide hammer or a tow truck. :)

If the grooves are deep enough, a strip of something easily glueable could be imbedded into the putty. Short working time, but nicely kneadable.

If I were using PVA, I'd use more like ten coats. :)

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On Sun, 29 May 2016 10:24:40 -0700, Christmas Card From a Hooker in

Well, I've pulled 36-foot-long sailboats out of a mold with two coats, so that will be enough unless there is too much mechanical interlock -- in which case, no number of coats will do it.
--
Ed Huntress

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