Metal buildings and lightening sort of OT

Excuse the lengthy OT message, but I noticed that folks in this group have built metal buildings for their workshops and though you might be
able to help me.
I am considering building a large garage/pole barn using metal.
I am very concerned with lightening strikes due to where I live.
My house is nearly the highest thing in town. When we get lightening it's always dancing around us. There had been a tree next to the house about 30 years ago, it would get hit by lightening and they finally put a lightening rod in it. Eventually got taken out anyway (big tree they cemented back together at one point). It was gone when I got here, but I had to deal with the stump which is when I found the braided wire from the lightening rod.
The roofs of the additions that were put on in the 20's were all metal covered with tar. It's clear they were not maintained, as many interior walls had damage, so they were probably exposed as I found them for some time. The chimneys on either end of the house had lightening rods, each fastened to their own ground, not in the middle which I think would have been the right thing to do. The ligtening rods were disconnected for at least the last 13 years (since we've been here), but I just had to spend 3 grand having the tops of both rebuilt as they were loose from being hit by lightening, and bricks had started falling down.
We have an old three holer outhouse that is now a garden shed. It had the same sheet metal roof in hip form, and I liked the look so left it alone (unlike the house where I had the metal torn off and replaced with a membrane roof). One day I was mowing the lawn and found a piece of rusty metal, I looked over at the back of the outhouse and there was a big burn mark and at least 3 feet of the roof had been blown off.
When I was making some changes to a small old hay barn so my wife could use the second floor, I noticed what looked like some singed paper on the roof. Further inspection showed that it had also had a metal roof, and had clearly been hit and burned by lightening.
If I look off into the woods on the hill to the left of our house, I can see trees that used to be green that got whacked by lightening and died from the hits (we think we know when it happened, helluva a storm, but of course it took years for everything to go bare).
When we walk in the woods behind our house, every now and then we find a tree top and occassionaly a whole tree that was clearly struck by lightening.
I've searched around the net and can't seem to find any real input on this. Someone told me that if I properly bond the building, I'll be all set. Well this makes sense except it makes me wonder if a 30x60 chunk of metal is going to be so attractive that it will invite the lightening and I'll end up with strikes on my wooden buildings?
Any real world experience would be greatly appreciated, since everything I have found on lightening seems inconclusive.
Sorry for the lengthy post, and thanks for any feedback. If emailing, remove nospam.
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wrote:

A metal building is probably the best thing to be in, actually. It forms what is known as a "faraday cage", and allows the lightning to find a clear path to ground that doesn't involve going through you. Ground it well, and you should be fine.

No, it'll attract the lightning to itself. You want it to be the most attractive to the lightning, so ground it well and give the lightning some nice exciting pointy spikes to go for (serious).
Snodgrass lighning rods used to have a very informative site, maybe they're a place you could look.
Dave Hinz
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Point lightning rods are no longer recommended for lightning rods. The lightning research center in Socorro NM discovered that a flat, stubby rod installed in arrays around the perimeter of the roof actually repel the buildup of the ground charge that precedes a strike. I imagine they have a web site. Visiting their research center can get real exciting, so to speak, during a storm. It is located on top of a mountain and has a large glass dome for observation. They send up balloons on steel cables to attract strikes and record their characteristics. I can't recall the name of the laboratory at the moment. Bugs
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Interesting. I'll check that out, thanks.
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snip
Good thing it's no longer in active use!
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Perhaps not. Might just be the perfect cure for constipation!
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something ......and in reply I say!:

Glad I didn't let _that_ one fly in the living room! ****************************************************************************************** Whenever you have to prove to yourself that you are not something, you probably are.
Nick White --- HEAD:Hertz Music
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
!! <") _/ ) ( ) _//- \__/
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Halloween night, 1956. We decide to steal an outhouse and put it on the front lawn of the high-school. Sneak into the farmers back yard, about 10 of us, and three guys go around to the back. Farmer must have decided to move it within the last few days, and had not covered over the old hole yet. Two guys fell in. They walked about 3 miles back to town. We wouldn't even let them in the back of one of the pickup trucks!
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 07:12:25 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@iinet.net.au (Old Nick) wrote:

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On 2 Apr 2005 07:30:59 -0800, "Too_Many_Tools"

To set the time frame for this tale; remember when motor oil came in real cans? (metal content)
A bunch of high school girls were having a Halloween slumber party about a half mile south of here up a gravel road. A bunch of girls attracts a bunch of boys; at my house since I lived closest to the slumber party.
WE decide to scare the girls. We had a lot of old farm machinery at our place. Among this collection was the front axle from a horse drawn wagon. WE decide to tie empty oil cans to the wheel spokes with baling wire and make a screaming run around the farm house full of girls. WE decide to put a handful of gravel in each can for effect. WE decide to hitch ourselves to the tongue with wire around our waists.
We sneak up their drive before tying the cans to the wheels. Someone gives the signal (there is always a signal) and away we go around the house a few times, yelling and making teenage boy noises.
The girls all run out on the porch screaming. You would think they would run inside if they were frightened. Female logic.
We break the circle, head down the drive and hit the gravel road back to my house. We still making all the noise we can when Vaughn falls down. With all the noise, no one notices in the dark. He's tied to the tongue with wire. The wheels run over him a few times and the cans are banging him pretty good. Anyway, after this half mile run and dragging Vaughn half that, we're really worn out. We darned near killed him.
We peeled off what was left of his clothes, layed him in the bed of a pickup and washed him off with a hose. He was cussing quite a bit. Of course, it was October. WE decided we had better take him home to his Mama. That would at least stop the cussing. It took two weeks of healing before he could come back to school.
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I've seen worse Andy. My buddies and I were drinking beer behind one guy's house - we didn't realize that one of the guys had jack daniels in his bottles until it was too late. So the other two of us had to figure out how to walk him home (we had driver's licenses by then, but were too smart to go driving around in that state) and inform his parents about the state of their son.
We were escorting him up the hill towards his house trying to sort the problem out in our mind when a guy in a VW bug came over the hilltop on the sidewalk and mowed us down, didn't even slow down or stop.
The guy we were bringing home got knocked spang out of his sneakers (really did happen, they were down the road apiece with the coat I had lent him) and gave him a compound fracture of his femur. That's a pretty strong bone in a 17 year old, too.
He spent more than two weeks, and it wasn't at home, before he could go back to school. They caught the guy because we gave a pretty good description and he left a bunch of his car trim bits on the roadside after hitting a street sign.
I still remember getting up after the car went by - the other guy who was with me, had my glasses in his hands. I had his. Never *did* figure that one out. It's a slap miracle that teenagers survive to adulthood.
Jim
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jim rozen wrote:

Yes, there's a whole bunch of guardian angels doing their level best to keep kids alive, but every once in a while one of them has to take a pee break and we lose a teen ager. Sometimes it's not really the kids' fault.
Our youngest son lost two of his high school classmates last year, one through a sailboat capsizing, and even though he was wearing a life vest hypothermia killed him before they found him. The other kid was involved in a head on collision with a drunk driver who got onto an interstate the wrong way by entering it through an exit ramp.
But, our son walked away without a scratch the first snowy night last November when he drove onto a patch of black ice on a slight curve, slid over to the curb and rolled his recently hard earned car onto its head.
Those guardian angels were working overtime for us that night.
http://home.comcast.net/%7Ejwisnia18/ben/#honda
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Hey Jeff, I guess you must have some "Native Americans" just like we do here in Albuquerque. (drunk - wrong way on I 40, did in most of a family) ...lew...
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On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 22:18:42 GMT, Lew Hartswick

Lew, Ya don't have to be a "Native American" to drive drunk and kill people. I fail to see why it matters where they were born or who they were born to. Hell, George Bush drove drunk and it was only luck that kept him from killing someone when he took out a hedge. ERS
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Eric R Snow wrote:

Yes, the guy who killed my son's friend wasn't a Native American.
But if I am to believe what I keep reading, and I'd be happy if someone would show me (with cites) tha I've been snookered, Native Americans do as a group are reputed to have a much lower tolerance to alcohol and a much higher incidence of alcoholism. I've been led to believe that is in part due to the fact that alcohol wasn't introduced into their culture until just a few hundred years ago, while the rest of us have been boozing it up for thousands of years, and Darwinism did it's thing.
Jeff
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On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 17:00:45 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

Jeff, I don't know either, but have heard, from Native Americans, that they are actually less able to deal with alcohol biologically. And Africans usually have darker skins than Europeans. But neither is relevant when someone drives drunk. What's relevant is why the person is driving drunk. Now if it's because they are drunk and made bad choices we need to find out a way to keep these people from drinking. But identifying the race in itself really has nothing to do with the person driving drunk. ERS
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On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 17:00:45 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

It was explained to me, that there is actually a genetic issue.
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
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BIG SNIP

Speaking of home to Mama.....Leonard wasn't the brightest guy. In fact, the whole family combined wouldn't add to an IQ of 101. When Leonard was in his mid-teens, he had the chore of feeding the horses and dunging out the stalls at the local dairy, very early in the morning. I don't think he had ever learned to tie a knot, as he too often managed to let one or more of the horses out into the alley, and they would wander into the streets around the dairy. The delivery guys, much annoyed and worried for the safety of the horses, would have to chase and catch them before they could get hitched up and away on their routes. Finally, Leonard was threatened with dire consequences if he allowed this to happen again. He didn't listen. Next time it occurred, after the drivers retrieved the horses, they pulled Leonard's pants down and painted his privates and backsides in the dairy colour scheme, red and green and black. Leonard was quite upset, and ran home to Mama, who promptly cleaned off the still tacky paint with some turpentine.
You could hear Leonard scream for miles.
But you know, he never let a horse get loose again.
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On Sun, 03 Apr 2005 05:20:49 -0400, Brian Lawson

Probably wasn't too bad until she lit it.....
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Andy Asberry wrote:

Heck, I remember when it came in 55 gallon barrels and we young pump jockeys had to transfer it into those one quart glass jars with those tinplate screw on spouts on top of them.
Jeff
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wrote:

Yeah, and there was the Flying A Service stations where you could get your car serviced ... had to get gas this morning and I think I got "serviced" instead $2.37 (up to $2.41 same station by the time I came home). When people came in, you did their windows, checked the water and oil for them and all those good things (been there done that)
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