Kinda on-topic: Shoes for Metal Roofs


So, every roof on the property is now metal. Our house roof is the
raised metal-tab stuff, and when it gets the least bit wet it's slicker
than snot -- to the point where we've already had a family member fall
off and injure himself (not badly, but still a good warning).
My New Balance tenny runners don't grip it when it's wet, I can just
barely keep traction by sitting down on it in jeans -- and denim usually
grips metal roofs pretty well.
So, are there any trick shoes, or shoe attachements, that one can wear to
keep from falling and breaking one's neck? Any of them that don't cost
an arm and a leg, yet still really work?
TIA
Reply to
Tim Wescott
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Hey Tim,
Not real sure why you want to wander around on the roof, but "deck shoes" for yachting have a pretty neat tread. They work pretty well on wet fibreglas/gel-coat. Try West Marine store or similar.
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario
Reply to
Brian Lawson
Something like rock climbing shoes might help, but really the proper thing is a fall protection package with appropriate harness, rope grab, rope and anchor brackets. They aren't particularly expensive and you should be able to buy a suitable kit at a ladder and scaffolding supplier.
Reply to
Pete C.
Basic maintenance, keeping the fir needles (fir needle tea is mildly acidic, and corrosive), fixing the old leaky ones, etc.
Why else?
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I've considered that, even if it isn't manly (the roofers that put on our roof just brag about broken bones). How do you anchor them when the roof you're on is the highest thing around?
Reply to
Tim Wescott
There are ridge anchors available, both temporary ones intended to be screwed in place, as well nice stainless ones intended for permanent installation.
Of course the first up and last down can be unprotected, but you are also not carrying tools at that point and can be extra cautious.
Reply to
Pete C.
A pressure washer with an extension pole and 180 angle head ought to take care of cleaning from ground level.
Reply to
Pete C.
I intend to get some of the safety gear described in this thread, but I keep putting it off. Meantime, I throw a long length (around 75 feet) of 5/8" nylon line over the ridge of the house, tying the standing end off to a tree in one case, or to a masonry porch column if I'm working on the back.
Then I tie a bowline-on-a-bight into the line at an appropriate distance. If I have to move much, I re-tie the knot.
It's inconvenient and it's not 100%, but a fall from my two-story roof, at my age, would change my life in a bad way if it didn't kill me. I'm willing to take the extra time.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
The kit I have has a full body harness, Petzel line grab, shock adsorbing lanyard to connect the two, a 50' or so assembly of 3/4" rope with double locking hook on one end and one of the temporary type screw down ridge anchors, all in a duffel carry bag.
The permanent mount SS anchors are of course a separate item if you wanted to install them.
Falling off a two story roof is not generally a pleasant thing I suspect.
Reply to
Pete C.
Still in a duffle bag out in the garage is a climbing harness and dynamic climbing rope. I was so worried my brother would kill himself building his house I bought it for him. My brother is a monkey, no way he would use it.
Rock climbers don't use 3/4" rope but they use a much thinner rope that stretches (dynamic). I seem to remember fall factor 2 meaning it would hold up catching a 185# man falling from the full length of the rope above the anchor to the full length below and not fail.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Let the Record show that "Pete C." on or about Sat, 09 Jan 2010 17:09:00 -0600 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
It ain't. If you are lucky, you will land on your fat assed brother in law, and be mildly hurt when you bounce off. Or you can fall down, go boom and break something in a non-lethal manner. You'll heal, but it is going to be a long time while you try to recall what it was you had been doing before The Fall. Tod's been a year recovering from a head injury from falling off a roof, and he's still not back up to speed. Worse case scenario is, you almost kill yourself, and are so crippled up, you can't do anything - and you have to hear that your fumble fingered brother-in-law "finished" it for you. - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I've an old pair I use when having to get up there on the metal carport roof and the house roof(shingles). I've been up there when it's been wet, works for both, the carport doesn't have that great a slope though it does have pine needles on it. Wally world carries them for about $6 a pair, not this time of year, though. Work reasonably well on wet ice, like today. In the 40s, ice is melting all over, but still have to walk on it. Just don't get into mud or you'll be tracking it everywhere. Those tread slits pick up small gravel, too. Slip them off before stepping on polished floors.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
Workboots with corked soles.
Steve R.
Reply to
Steve R.
I used Walmart boat shoes and a safety rope. Then I found a roof hook that you put on the end of a ladder. You hook it on the ridge and work off the ladder. A little slower but way less scary. It's pretty easy to move around. Karl
Reply to
kfvorwerk
Let the Record show that "Steve R." on or about Sat, 9 Jan 2010 23:39:34 -0800 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Those work nice, just don't walk on the hardwood floors. - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I can't understand why so many people joke about falls. I'm in the class of the bigger you are the harder you fall. Not to be confused with the bigger they are the harder you fall in a fight sense.
I had a 6ft ladder leaning against my house as I tacked on some siding. It collapsed. I landed on the ground. It took months for my shoulder to heal up. All I can recall is I was standing straight up when if failed. I don't lean sideways on ladders.
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Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
I've saved this message so I know what to look for. Thanks, Pete.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
I wonder how felt soled wading boots would work?
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Just don't anchor to the car when SWMBO gets the urge to shop!
Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
I got six months off work by pushing some crown molding into place against a 9' ceiling - the ladder went sideways and I landed on an old fireplace hearth under the carpet, no bounce there! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller

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