Most magnetic stainless?

    --Need a piece of highly magnetically inclined stainless. Can someone suggest the alloy number I should be looking for?
    --TIA,
--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Yet another genius
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : without a job...
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All 300 series are not magnetic.
All 400 series are magnetic. 416 is free machining, machines similar to drill rod. 440 is much harder (even anealed) but workable.
I have also machined PH17-4 (also know as 630) and it is truely tough stuff. I don't like machining it. I have discovered that good carbide endmills (Atrax) make it feel like you are cutting aluminum!
See mcmaster catalog for a brief but good description of various SS.
chuck
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Yeah, McMaster Carr has nice little summaries under a variety of headings--bearings, bronzes, drill rod, screw types, etc. A nice touch, imo.
---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
wrote:

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Charles A. Sherwood wrote:

In the annealed state they are non magnetic. They are magnetic when work hardened.

I have discovered that good carbide

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Might be a good idea to suggest how you'll use it. It might dictate the proper alloy. Some, like 17-4 PH, are advised to not be put in service in the solution annealed condition, so heat treat could be necessary if you choose that alloy.
Harold
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Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

There is absolutely no reason not to use 17-4 in the annealed state other than being slightly softer and weaker than in the heat treated state. Even in the annealed state it is very strong.

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service in

Take that up with Joslyn-------I'm simply repeating *exactly* what their product data sheet says:
"Joslyn 17-4 PH should never be put in service in Condition A (Solution Annealed)"
Interestingly, Jorgensen's stock book agrees with what Joslyn says.
I have to assume they know more about their product than you do.
Harold
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Does Joslyn say why 17-4 should not be placed in service in the Annealed condition?
Dan
Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

their
(Solution
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No, they make no mention of a reason, and I've yet to read one anywhere else. I'm as curious as anyone---I have a considerable amount of the material, a gift from a friend that closed the doors on his shop for health reasons. I use the hell out of it, but it's very easy to heat treat, so I do so. If, by chance, you happen to discover anything pertaining to the material, I'd be keenly interested in hearing from you.
It's strange material to machine, but once you're on to it, it's a pleasure to work with.
Harold

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Its corrosion resistance is not very good in the solution treated condition. If corrosion resistance is not an issue then I don't see any reason not to use 17-4 before hardening, but if you don't need the corrosion resistance or strength there are much cheaper alternatives.
Ned Simmons
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Thanks, I have some remnants that I use sometimes. Fortunately the heat treat is very easy so I will do that whenever corrosion resistance or strength is a factor.
Dan
Ned Simmons wrote:

any
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Had they worded their comments differently, I'd likely agree-------but in this case, unlike all others that I have read, it distinctly says to not put it in service in solution annealed condition. All other stainless specs I've read caution that the material at hand may be lower in corrosion resistance in the annealed state, but there is no recommendation that they not be put in service. Curious, isn't it!
Harold
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says...

Yes indeed. I have an Armco product data brochure from 1978 that contradicts your reference. Here's the same brochure updated a bit...
<www.aksteel.com/pdf/markets_products/stainless/precipitati on/17-4_PH_Data_Bulletin.pdf&es17>
On page 4 it says,
"This alloy exhibits useful mechanical properties in Condition A. Tests at Kure Beach, NC, after 14 years show excellent stress corrosion resistance. Condition A material has been used successfully in numerous applications. The hardness and tensile properties fall within the range of those for Conditions H 1100 and H 1150.
However, in critical applications, the alloy is used in the precipitation-hardened condition, rather than Condition A. Heat treating to the hardened condition, especially at the higher end of the temperature range, stress relieves the structure and may provide more reliable resistance to stress corrosion cracking than in Condition A."
Ned Simmons
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anywhere
any
in
put
specs
they
Thanks for the updated data. I think the last sentence explains it pretty well. I'd suggest it *can* be used in the solution annealed condition.
By the way, at the bottom of my sheet, it mentions that 17-4 PH is a registered trademark of Armco Steel Corp. I would think their information would be correct.
Harold
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Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

Harold I found the following reason for the warning against using 17-4 in condition A, in the ASM Metals Handbook, 8th edition, Volume 2 Heat Treating, Cleaning, and Finishing. Page 249 preface " 17-4 PH is normally supplied in the solution treated condition, in which it has an essentially martensitic structure and has limited formability. Fabrication .....bla,bla,bla " "This alloy should not be put into service in any application in the solution treated condition, because in this condition its ductility can be relatively low and its resistance to stress corrosion cracking is poor. Hardening to any of the strength levels shown in table 7 (H900 to H1150) improves both toughness and resistance to stress corrosion. Interesting, is that the following section on 17-7 PH makes no such mention of warning in condition A. Compounding the confusion further as MIL-HNBK-5J " Metallic Materials for Aerospace Vehicle Structures" warn with the use of 17-7 PH in condition A, but not 17-4. In any case, I stand corrected, and Harold wins the cigar. Tom
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in
put
specs
they
Chuckle!
I'm willing to split the cigar with you, Tom. Thanks for the great report! It's always been a mystery to me what the reason might be------but I've always been quick to make mention of the caution-------*just in case*. Better to err on the safe side I always say.
Harold
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I'm just guessing here, but it looks like it must be in a supersaturated condition, with heating releasing the solute as precipitates, hardening it. This compares to aluminum that's halfway heat treated, since aluminum also precipitation hardens. I would guess it gradually ages at room temperature, possibly warping in the process, but this begs the question of shelf life; or perhaps the stresses cause trouble.
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

I find this very interesting, do you have a link? I have an old Jorgensens book that I will have to dig out, but I never heard of Joslyn. I have always used an old NASA research booklet as my guide for heat treatment and properties of all the precipitating hardening stainless steels. 17-4 is real amazing stuff. It cuts with a fantastic finish, drills easier than 304 or 316, and heat treats simply at 900 degrees F for the H900 properties which I do in a small dental vacuum oven.
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the
you
oven.
Sorry, no link. All I have is a photo copy of the literature, which I have already scanned, so you're welcome to it if you're interested. Contact me on the side if you wish and I'll forward it to you.
Like you, I find it very nice to machine. It's a bit tough on carbide when roughing, but then all stainless aside from the free machining grades are. The finishes are outstanding, and even heat treated, it still machines quite well, although in the H900 condition it can be a bit challenging.
I use a burnout oven for heat treating small items, but I have a large electric heat treat oven (23KW) that I will eventually get installed for larger items.
Harold
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: Might be a good idea to suggest how you'll use it. It might dictate the : proper alloy. Some, like 17-4 PH, are advised to not be put in service in : the solution annealed condition, so heat treat could be necessary if you : choose that alloy.     --OK here's the thing: like most folks I've got a truck with a totally inadequate glove compartment. What I've done is glue a strip of CRS to the dashboard. I went down to the local TAP Plastics store and got a couple of those square transparent boxes, maybe 1-1/2" square and tall enough to hold plastic spoons, toothpicks, etc; i.e. the things one always needs on long drives. I plunk a super magnet in the bottom of each one, put it on the steel strip and presto: I'm organized. Now the steel is totally rusted out and gunk is everywhere. Enter stainless, exit mess, yes? :-)
--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Yet another genius
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : without a job...
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