Need air compressor

On 5 Jan 2007 13:55:55 -0800, "flybabylocker"


"Gas" in this context means gasoline engine. Good for portable use, not so good for shop use. Noisier, exhaust fumes, maintenance.

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wrote:

Giving someone a white elephant to keep and care for, is considered one of the highest honors in some asian countries. A sacred animal, and a sign that the king is just and all is well across the land.
It was also used as a punishment by various kings. He would give one to a nobleman who pissed him off..as the upkeep and support would keep him impoverished.
On the other hand..an air compressor..its like given guys a testosterone injection. An air compressor is a Big Tool and with it..we can do STUFF!! Lots of stuff! We can even invent Stuff to do stuff with it!
Uh Uh UH!! (*Tim the Toolman).
On the old maps..the unknown territory was marked.."here be dragons"
Welcome to the land of the dragons <G>
Gunner
"Deep in her heart, every moslem woman yearns to show us her tits" John Griffin
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Gunner wrote:

Yeah, but that was before they made good casters. ;-)
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 10:51:32 -0600, Ignoramus30651

Ignore the HP rating. Go by nameplate volts and amps for electrical considerations, and by CFM at 90 PSI for air delivery. Compressors vary widely in HP for given air delivery.
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flybabylocker wrote:

That's a small thing, may be too small for the intended purpose. Probably OK for things about the size of a book, but it will run out of sand pretty quickly. The good news is it won't take a big compressor.
For about the same money, you could buy something like this:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber4202
....which would be good if one has an old rusty tractor, for example
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On 5 Jan 2007 08:30:53 -0800, "flybabylocker"

I'd say that 5 CFM would run that blaster OK, based on specs for a similar one at Northern Tool. Some 115 volt compressors can produce 5 CFM. Ignore the HP ratings, look for CFM at 90 PSI.
That blaster will be OK for small jobs. I have one like it. For future reference, TPTools sells their S-25 siphon gun for about $45. It will work on 4 to 8 CFM with the small nozzles, and it works quite well. I wouldn't tackle a trailer with it, but it does everything I want to do that will fit in a small cabinet. It works MUCH better than import siphon guns that look just like it.
http://www.tptools.com/product.asp?mscssid QWMFCLUPC39PJ8F7NHS9JFWU8E2V0D
More CFM is always a "good thing" with air compressors but more CFM more $. A good shop compressor that won't be soon outgrown would be something that produces 10.5 CFM or better, which will be a 220 volt machine with 60 gallon tank. They can be found for about $400 new with a bit of shopping. Here's a 13.3 CFM for $499 at Lowe's http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId4819-48540-K7060HFV&lpage=none
Here's an 11.2 CFM job for $439: http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200311707_200311707
Either of these compressors would run the TPTools S-25 with medium nozzle, and for a little while with the large nozzle.
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wrote:

Don. the above link does not work. I wanted to check it out.
I found it finally by searching for item number S-25. I have a question. Do I need a cabinet for using it, or can I just use it by putting its siphon pipe into a bucket with media?
i
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On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 15:24:31 -0600, Ignoramus30651

Indeed it doesn't, don't know why.

Works fine out of a bucket as long as the media is dry. Get both small and medium nozzles and orifices because the small one gags on crushed walnut shells (AKA bird bedding). You have enough air to run the medium. Do it outdoors or you'll have a gritty mess in short order. Full face mask, please.
Differences between the S-25 and cheapo imports: * different pickup tube design * 5/8" ID siphon hose doesn't plug or hiccup * to change air consumption and blast rate you change both orifice and nozzle.
I don't know how it compares to a pressure-feed blaster because I've never used the latter. The S-25 does all the blasting I need to do. Anything I can't do with it is sent to Arctic blasting, whose "cabinet" is a barn with a silo for a grit hopper. Tawk about compressors -- lines into the barn are like jackhammer hose.
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wrote:

That's great. How much media does it use. Example, let's say that I want to sandblast, say, a 1.5x1.5x48" steel square tubing piece, how much media would I expect to run through?
i
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On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 16:17:29 -0600, Ignoramus30651

That depends a lot on how crusty the workpiece is. My wild guess would be about a pound per minute but it's been a while since I did any blasting from a bucket. "Lava sand" is cheap grit that is pretty aggressive, considerably better than silica sand without the silicosis hazard.
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wrote:

Sounds good, I think that I will buy that sand blasting gun. I believe that HF sells lava sand.
i
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Isn't pumice lava sand? If so I have a few small boxes of it never opened. I think it often used by rock tumblers .
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On Fri, 5 Jan 2007 19:01:43 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (daniel peterman) wrote:

It might be, but what I referred to is black stuff of maybe 80 or 100 mesh. It might have another name like volcanic slag or something. It is very inexpensive at HD, Menards and the like, a very few bux for a 20 lb bag. It works quite well for paint and rust removal on steel though it'll distort thin sheetmetal. It's more aggressive than sand at about the same cost or less.
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On Sat, 06 Jan 2007 00:07:09 -0600, Don Foreman

Google "Black Beauty" - it's graded coal slag.
Myself, I stick to a blast cabinet and medium glass beads, most of the stuff I do is cleaning up small parts for paint prep.
Haven't needed bigger, or I'd already have a pressure-pot blaster.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Pumice is a rather soft blown lava component. It is like the foam on a beer. Real lava sand is black and is fractured and beat upon by an ocean wave.
Natural beaches are in various colors from pure white to pure black. Mostly brownish.
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
daniel peterman wrote:

-
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On 5 Jan 2007 08:30:53 -0800, "flybabylocker"

Go see the previous response - 'the wise guy' is a good guy, and he makes good wire brushes. Tom just forgets that some people aren't in on the Running Joke. (As we're all dying laughing and you stand there going "What's so funny?)

That's a baby one, the 5 HP compressor would be more than enough. You could get away with less for that particular use, but the 5 HP will satisfy the average home shop user's every need.
You could go buy a little portable 1-1/2 HP or 2 HP "Contractor Model" (*) and he'll be fine for a while, might even go several years - till the first time he tries changing a tire with an impact wrench and has to stop twice on each lugnut to let the compressor build up air again. And a job that should have been sped up with air tools ends up taking longer than doing it by hand.
And he /will/ eventually get the itch for "More Power!!" and start lusting after all the goodies in the Binford Tools catalog - Trust me, It's a Guy Thing. ;-)
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binford_Tools )
Then you're out the money for the little one and need to go get a big one anyway. Sounds counter-intuitive to me...
(* - Same selection rules apply, just smaller. If you want one that will live long and not be noisy while running, you want an oil lube belt drive compressor on a decent sized 15-gallon-plus tank. The direct-drive units are noisy and tend to not live long.)

You have several Home Depot's in the area, looks like Leominster and Marlborough are closest. Lowe's - Westborough, Framingham, Worcester.
There are also specialty companies that do air compressors, and they might have a clean used commercial duty unit for a reasonable price. Crack open the Yellow Pages.

Harbor Freight and other online suppliers don't have to be close, they can truck ship it to you. But clarify how you need it delivered while you arrange the order, the minimum they have to do (if they aren't told differently) is drop it off at the curb and you're on your own from there.
Make sure they know you don't have a forklift (unless you do, which simplifies things a LOT...) and if they need a truck with a Liftgate or their own forklift, a smaller truck if your area has weight length or size limits, or if you need them to take it all the way into the garage. The seller will know what to ask, and how to write up the shipping instructions.
(A 5-HP Vertical will need a tall Refrigerator Dolly and two or three people to move by hand. They are top-heavy, it'll try to tip over if you sneeze. I horsed mine around alone, but I also used a shop crane/engine hoist from the top and went reeaalll slllooww.)

(Note: I'm an electrician... I usually remember these things.) Anything over 1-1/2 HP needs a special circuit, but that isn't too expensive if you are anywhere near the power panel.
If you have to cross the whole house to get a new power feed to the garage, that can cost - but if you have to do that, bring across an oversized 50-amp line to the garage - even if you only hook up the compressor to it right now. The only cost now is the bigger wire.
Then when he wants to connect a welder or other heavy power tools in the garage, the heavy power cable is already going there in the walls/attic/basement. You have the electrician install a small breaker sub-panel in the garage, a bigger feed breaker in the main panel, and it's all done.
Plan Ahead. Much cheaper to do it once and do it right, than to do it over several times.
--<< Bruce >>--
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If you're considering used,
www.used-tools.com "The Tool Shed", 578 W Boylston St, Worcester, MA (508) 853-0590 Ask for "Al", he doesn't get compressors in often, but he should be very familiar with sources for tools in your area. He also does gift certificates, should that be somewhere you think your other half would enjoy shopping (assuming he's not already a regular). Note the slightly unusual hours: Wed-Sat 1-5pm (check the newsletter on the website to be sure he'll be open on any given Saturday).
Someone else mentioned CraigsList: http://boston.craigslist.org/search/tls?query=compressor This one might be a possibility: http://boston.craigslist.org/nos/tls/257675300.html or maybe this one: http://boston.craigslist.org/sob/tls/257812084.html craigslist is like any other classified ad--there are good people and not-so-good people, keep your eyes open and trust your instincts.
Speaking of other classifieds: One of the more compreshensive used tools listings in your area is this one: http://www.thewantad.com / Also available at most convenience stores.
A little north for you, but may also have some possibilities is this one: http://www.unclehenrys.com /
If you're only considering new, there are a TON of industrial suppliers and automotive equipment suppliers in greater Worcester. Some of the other guys here may have some better recommendations for individual places.
If you're willing to drive to southern NH, these guys might be a possibility: http://www.brentwoodmachine.com /
--Glenn Lyford
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.invalid says...

It may run, though I'm not sure how "nicely." A typical 5HP is going to draw 28A @ 240V, so while it may start the motor intermittently, it's likely to trip the breaker when running the compressor hard.
Also, I'm pretty sure this will violate the NEC's provision that the circuit breaker not be subject to more than 80% of its rating by a continuous load.
Ned Simmons
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wrote:

I think 21 or 22 amps is more typical for a non-industrial 5 HP compressor. Mine uses a GE Commercial motor, 5 HP, service factor 1.0, 21 amps, rated for continuous compressor duty. Zero problems running it on a 30 amp circuit.
A home shop compressor is an intermittent load but I don't know how NEC defines "continuous".
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wrote:

The 5 HP motor that I am about to install into my compressor is rated for 28 amps, IIRC. I will need to upgrade its circuit.
i
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