need help hooking up three phase mill

I bought an Index mill which has a 220/440 three phase motor
on it. It also has a "ThreePhaser Model 1000" converter box
on it. I don't have any docs on it but is is wired already.
Problem is that it has a 110V 20amp plug on it. (looks like
a regular 110 plug except one blade is rotated 90 degrees)
I'm guessing that someone used that for 220 volts so that it
couldn't plug into a regular outlet. I assume that I need
a line voltage of 220 since there is transformer in the
converter. I plan on installing a 220V 40amp circuit to
it if I am right. So does that sound like someone just
used the wrong plug on it? If anyone has any ThreePhaser
docs that would be great!
Reply to
afdr9lk
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If I'm not mistaken, that *is* a 208/220/240 volt plug, it's not something that someone has screwed around with. Female receptacles are available to match your plug. They're made that way so some fool doesn't plug 120 volt appliances into them.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
that sounds like a 220V plug, contrary to what you say.
yes.
can you ask the seller? People do the weirdest things with wiring.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus32489
I think it could be either a 120 volt 20 amp plug or a 240 volt 20 amp plug. They look very similar. But one has the right blade rotated and the other has the left blade rotated..
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Ah... I didn't know both existed! I could have easily confused it. I'll look again.
Reply to
afdr9lk
That plug is intended to be used for 120VAC, and the blades are in a different orientation so that it can only be inserted into a 120VAC 20A rated receptacle (or power cord end connector). The sideways-blade plug is to prevent a 20A appliance from being plugged into a common 15A rated receptacle.
A 20A rated 120V receptacle has a hot blade slot that is sideways-T-shaped. This will allow more common less-than-20A plugs to be used with it, or the sideways-bladed 20A plug.
Depending upon the current demand of the converter and motor, you may want to choose a more versatile 240VAC receptacle and plug. One such style is the type where the blade slots are both sideways (flat, in line, horizontally opposed).
Your best option is choose the properly rated 240VAC receptacle, based upon the NEC recommended style and current rating for the maximum safe current rating of the new circuit you install. You may have, or get more 240V equipment in the future, and having standardized/common connections is best, as well as more convenient.
WB ..........
Reply to
Wild Bill
Thanks for that, Dan. I wasn't aware.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Here's a good reference on NEMA plug and outlet configuration from Leviton:
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-Bill Fill Olympia, WA
Reply to
Bill Fill
The two horsepower motor on my Bridgeport mill draws 6 amps at 220 volts according to the nameplate. I don't know what size motor your mill has, it could be 5 hp. But it seems like a 40 amp breaker might be a little high. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Way cool, Bill.
Thanks.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Hmmm... No 40amp configurations?
Reply to
afdr9lk
Breakers protect the wire not the machine. That means I can draw a max of 40 amps through the circuit without overheating the wire.
Reply to
afdr9lk
After I posted the above I thought about that. When I wired my shop I put each machine on a separate circuit and the breakers protect the machines. The wire is large enough that the breakers protecting the machines are smaller than the breakers would be to protect the wires. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
I suggest that you know the dimensions of the blade spacing on your plugs/sockets when you go shopping. I was going to pick up a plug and socket to make an extension cord for my welder, 50amp 240v. That's one big blade, one small blade and common, kinda like an oversized 110v configuration. Ended up at Home Depot and grabbed a plug and socket and attempted to put them together. Spacings were different!!!! I ended up grabbing the manager of the electrical section and showed him. Blank stare. No idea what to do about it. I thanked him for his time, suggested that he call the manufacturer and ask them how it was supposed to work, and left. Wish I could recall the brand.
Reply to
nic
It's hardly his fault.
He stocks the plugs and sockets that sell the best. You can bet that he'd have something to fit your dryer or electric stove. I'd lop off the connector on your welder and throw it away and fit connectors that are readily available.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
How is the breaker protecting the machine?
Reply to
afdr9lk
Beats me. I just used the breakers suggested by the manufacturer. Maybe they just prevent too much smoke coming out of the motor housing. Actually, I think that's exactly what they are for. If the motor draws too much current, say from an overload, the breaker pops. On my big mill with contactors there are heaters that open the contactors if too much current is drawn. I did pop the breakers once when I lost a leg of the three phase. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
I really don't think that is a good way to do it. You're only going to be able to find breakers like 15,20,30... Then you'd have to hope that the machine would draw something like 19 amps for a 20 amp breaker to protect it.
Reply to
afdr9lk
I incorrecly identified "sideways" blade position as the hot/line terminal in my earlier reply.
It is the Neutral terminal in the 120VAC 20A plugs and receptacles.
Hopefully, since the terminals are color coded, this mistake won't cause anyone to connect the leads incorrectly.
sideways-T-shaped.
WB ..............
> That plug is intended to be used for 120VAC, and the blades are in a > different orientation so that it can only be inserted into a 120VAC 20A > rated receptacle (or power cord end connector). The sideways-blade plug is > to prevent a 20A appliance from being plugged into a common 15A rated > receptacle. > > Depending upon the current demand of the converter and motor, you may want > to choose a more versatile 240VAC receptacle and plug. > One such style is the type where the blade slots are both sideways (flat, in > line, horizontally opposed). > > Your best option is choose the properly rated 240VAC receptacle, based upon > the NEC recommended style and current rating for the maximum safe current > rating of the new circuit you install. > You may have, or get more 240V equipment in the future, and having > standardized/common connections is best, as well as more convenient. > > WB > .......... > > >
> > > I bought an Index mill which has a 220/440 three phase motor > > > on it. It also has a "ThreePhaser Model 1000" converter box > > > on it. I don't have any docs on it but is is wired already. > > > Problem is that it has a 110V 20amp plug on it. (looks like > > > a regular 110 plug except one blade is rotated 90 degrees) > > > I'm guessing that someone used that for 220 volts so that it > > > couldn't plug into a regular outlet. I assume that I need > > > a line voltage of 220 since there is transformer in the > > > converter. I plan on installing a 220V 40amp circuit to > > > it if I am right. So does that sound like someone just > > > used the wrong plug on it? If anyone has any ThreePhaser > > > docs that would be great! > > > > > > >
Reply to
Wild Bill
Most of the NEMA connectors actually *have* the designation molded into them. It'll probably say right on the plug.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen

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