Never Stand Under a Load

Fortunately, nobody was under this load.....
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.....it looks like a monumentally expensive screw up.
Dave
Reply to
dav1936531
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Reminds me of a comparator that I was moving with a forklift...
Reply to
Ignoramus12504
All those people standing around with out eye protection.
As to the lift, I have a feeling it was a freak accident, I'm not sure what the safety factor is but it should be sustantial for something that is land based as opposed to aviation where the factor is trimmed a bit.
Wes.
Reply to
Wes
Well, in the beginning they state that the rotor weighs 75 tons.. Then towards the end, they show the placard that clearly states the crane is rated for 60,000 KG, which equals ~ 66.14 tons.. Or maybe that was just the support bar.. either way, someone somewhere made a mistake. Freak accidents should not happen with something that weighs that much.
Reply to
tnik
60,000 KG is 60.000 tons.
Good eye on the placards.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19744
Back in my youth in the army, we moved missile sections around with an overhead crane. As I recall, we load- tested *everything* - crane, lifting jigs, straps, every six months.
A load test on this crane before the lift would have prevented the accident unless it was a *real* freak event.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
...
60k kg --> 60 tonnes (2200-lb tons), not 60 (2000-lb) tons.
1 tonne==1000 kg, 1 ton==2000 lb
--
Reply to
dpb
Close, within 10%, but no cigar. KG = 2.2 pounds, T = 2,000 pounds.
-- Intuition isn't the enemy, but the ally, of reason. -- John Kord Lagemann
Reply to
Larry Jaques
In the metric system, 1 ton = 1000kg. That is a definition.
Kristian Ukkonen.
Reply to
Kristian Ukkonen
You're right. Since the accident happened in Metricville, I sit corrected. FWIW, we call that a "metric ton" over here.
-- Intuition isn't the enemy, but the ally, of reason. -- John Kord Lagemann
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I just call it a ton, and I call 2000 lbs 2000 lbs.
Reply to
Ignoramus19744
Yabbut, you grew up in Metricville and we grew up in Poundville.
-- Intuition isn't the enemy, but the ally, of reason. -- John Kord Lagemann
Reply to
Larry Jaques
When I think about how "short tons" are used, it is always the equivalent of "Sears horsepower".
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19744
Nope wrong again! I grew up in Canada in the 1950-60's which was very much Poundville. Went through the joys of metrification in Australia, then again in Fiji. I'm now retired and work as a volunteer at a Science museum where I refurbish ancient machinery. Most of it is Imperial sizes again. No wonder I keep a conversion chart as close as possible.
Reply to
Grumpy
Yabbut, -you're- not Iggy, whom I was quoting there. Silly wabbit. Kicks are for Trids.
With that background, you should already know the conversions by heart, having memorized them 3 or 4 decades ago.
-- Intuition isn't the enemy, but the ally, of reason. -- John Kord Lagemann
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Learning metric so many times is why you're so grumpy? ;-)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I do know most of the conversions by heart including pressure a lot of the others, but a metric/fractional imperial/ decimal imperial char is a lot quicker.
Reply to
Grumpy

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