OT: Low Profile Outlet

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Wire...Box... 120v-Plug
I could have sworn I saw something like that once, but for the life of me I can't find it.
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There are Low Voltage junction boxes about half the depth of 120V AC boxes. They are deep enough for barrier strips and these:
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but not NEMA 5-15 receptacles, the common 120VAC wall outlet.
I haven't seen an outlet strip with cords at both ends, and can't suggest making something that might not be legal.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I wasn't sure what he wanted. A low profile box or an outlet
You can get surface mount Duplex Outlets:
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These are about the shallowest boxes I've seen:
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Reply to
Leon Fisk
Yeah I am very familiar with low voltage equipment like that I held an L67 and C12 (combined later) license for 23 years until I retired from contracting.
I am looking for a low profile box/outlet with receptacle on the small side. There are some older surface mount bakelite receptacles, but I am not a fan of bakelite.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Yeah I am very familiar with low voltage equipment like that I held an L67 and C12 (combined later) license for 23 years until I retired from contracting.
I am looking for a low profile box/outlet with receptacle on the small side. There are some older surface mount bakelite receptacles, but I am not a fan of bakelite.
----------------------- I've installed snap-in outlets in tight spaces in custom equipment, like oven controllers.
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The right-angled pigtail leads don't increase the required box depth and you can install them in your choice of plastic or metal container, or shear, punch and fold your own as I often do. A safe-edge file squares the corners of a milled cutout neatly.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I am about resigned to making something custom using an outlet like that at this point. I had hoped to find a ready made solution as I'm just so darn busy in the shop, but ultimately I answer to SWMBO even before customers.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Oh, Wiremold makes those; steel channel with outlets every six inches, ready to take house wiring or a cord.

I screwed six feet of it to the wall and made it a branch circuit, so there's ONE place in the house where the bevy of trickle chargers can live.
Reply to
whit3rd
Oh, Wiremold makes those; steel channel with outlets every six inches, ready to take house wiring or a cord.

I screwed six feet of it to the wall and made it a branch circuit, so there's ONE place in the house where the bevy of trickle chargers can live.
----------------- We had those on the front edge of the upper shelf on electronics lab benches. They are very convenient for equipment on the upper shelf but not so good for stuff on the bench top because the dangling cords get in the way. For that I prefer an outlet strip tucked behind the gear.
My kitchen solution, which also isn't what was apparently asked for, is a 6 outlet strip with magnets added to the back, stuck high on the stove side of the refrigerator. Being me, I added a GFCI and a remote volt/amp/wattmeter display to it to imitate this at a fraction of the price:
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It normally plugs into the single stove top outlet, or into the inverter when running from batteries and solar power, thus the wattmeter to monitor voltage, current and watt hour consumption from the batteries.
The 7 outlet USB3 hub attached under the top shelf on my computer desk doubles as a charging station. An AT35 USB3 wattmeter shows if the device is actually properly connected and charging, and how many mAh it accepted from empty to fully charged, a good measure of battery condition.
I added external Anderson connectors to a little 30V 5A USB2 wattmeter so it can show the charging of a 12V battery, or fast charge a hungry USB device from a lab power supply. Anderson PP45s are a good choice for battery power which can flow in either direction because they genderless and dead-front safe from shorting when unplugged.
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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