oxygen/acetylene gouging tips?

I am now the owner of quite a few oddball torch tips, all of which fit my Airco torch. Ernie was telling me yesterday about CJP weld joints, where you have to
prepare a butt joint with a full vee and a backing plate, weld it up 100%, turn it over and scarf (arc gouge) away the backing plate, and weld it from the back. This achieves C-omplete J-oint P-enetration. I was quailing at the thought of how I might be able to do that and lo today into my lap drops a small fortune in gouging tips. They say in various online catalogs these are useful for both beveling plates for vee welds, and for gouging away back plates. Only problem is I don't know how to use a gouging tip. Anyone ever do this and want to try to explain how? I don't want to go out and do something stupid. A No. 13 rivet washing tip looks like you could drop a No. 10 set screw right down the oxygen orifice without it touching *anything*. HUGE. That thing could make a blob of steel that could go right through a leather boot, for example.
Grant Erwin
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Do these gouging tips look like a regular cutting tip that has been bent?
Dan
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For some CP joints you don't have to take the backing bar off especially on structural. People have read weld symbols incorrectly and made a lot of unnecessary work for themselves. Don't be alarmed with the large center hole. The idea is to create a soft gentle breath of oxy to peel the material off. A violent restricted jet often will blow too deep. You use around 20 to 40 psi depending on the depth of your cut. A good practice thing to do is to try torching a nut off a half inch diameter bolt without damaging the thread. Run the nut onto the bolt thread then secure the bolt standing up in a vice. The idea is to get in quickly heating the nut to red then blowing off one side until you see the threads exposed. Heat the other side and blow it off also. You want to do this quickly before the heat is conducted into the bolt. If the bolt is heated the oxygen will cut the threads. The tactic is to heat rapidly then just have enough oxy velocity to burn away the side of the nut. A washing or gouging tip often has an advantage over a conventional tip. A skilled person working on heavy equipment can often save the majority of bolts on tracks or undercarriage components. If you took a large impact and tried to remove the rusted nuts the bolts would snap. The larger the bolt the easier this trick is. You are pretty good if you can do it with 3/8 diameter. Randy
I am now the owner of quite a few oddball torch tips, all of which fit my Airco torch. Ernie was telling me yesterday about CJP weld joints, where you have to prepare a butt joint with a full vee and a backing plate, weld it up 100%, turn it over and scarf (arc gouge) away the backing plate, and weld it from the back. This achieves C-omplete J-oint P-enetration. I was quailing at the thought of how I might be able to do that and lo today into my lap drops a small fortune in gouging tips. They say in various online catalogs these are useful for both beveling plates for vee welds, and for gouging away back plates. Only problem is I don't know how to use a gouging tip. Anyone ever do this and want to try to explain how? I don't want to go out and do something stupid. A No. 13 rivet washing tip looks like you could drop a No. 10 set screw right down the oxygen orifice without it touching *anything*. HUGE. That thing could make a blob of steel that could go right through a leather boot, for example.
Grant Erwin
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Thanks, Randy. Today I got a bunch of really oddball Airco tips. There are several each of No. 124, 144 and 164, all normal cutting tips I'm familiar with. There are also styles 183, 185, 195, 197 and 199. Lots of 'em. I used to watch O/A torch specialists we called "burners" in the shipyards as they used special tips to cut nuts off of bolts, or just to flow steel nuts off of cast iron pipe flanges. I pretty much have a clue how to do that, it's making a U-shaped gouge I don't know how to do. I do know some old Boilermakers, maybe I'll just look them up and ask them for a lesson.
Grant
R. Zimmerman wrote:

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