PAM Cooking Spray

I installed a new stove a couple weeks ago in the house. It was no big deal. The most stressful part was making sure it was jetted and regulated
for LP gas instead of natural gas. I left off (a woefully short) back splash because I plan to make a nice one that is actually tall enough to keep grease and cooking spatter off the wall. Well of course SWMBO didn't care for that much. She wanted that little back splash installed until I get a round to-it.
Yesterday I went ahead and tackled that. Its got pre drilled holes and thumb screws. Sadly the holes were not tapped. Out to the shop for a tap handle and an M4-.7 tap then back at it. Oops. Forgot the tapping fluid, and I could feel the stainless starting to gall as I tried to start the tap. Rather than walk back out to the shop I hit the tap with a shot of olive l cooking spray and it worked. Maybe not as impressively as Tap-Magic tapping fluid but good enough to tap a couple holes in some stainless sheet.
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On Tue, 23 Oct 2018 10:07:19 -0700
<snip>> Forgot the tapping fluid,

If I recall correctly "lard" was commonly used. If you find that round tuit here is an old Machinery's Reference Book on Cutting Lubricants:
https://archive.org/details/cuttinglubricant00newyrich
All sorts of old concoctions you can experiment with :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On Tuesday, October 23, 2018 at 1:47:51 PM UTC-4, Leon Fisk wrote:

tap.

l

ping

Note that the old reference book talks about lard OIL, not lard.
Lard oil is extracted from lard by separating it from the stearin crystals, which are the component that makes it stiff and pasty. It's the oil that m akes good cutting lube. It used to be a common commodity because it was a c heap replacement for whale oil in lamps. The stearin was (and is) used in m aking candles, but it hampers cutting by keeping the oil from wicking into the cut.
Lard oil is not as good as modern chemical cutting soups but it's pretty go od overall. I still use my old can of Buttercut, with was straight lard oil , for cutting ferrous metals on my lathe. I also use it for threading and t apping in applications that aren't highly demanding. For those, I have a co uple of precious cans of 40-year-old Tap Magic. And for threading hard stee l I still have a half-pint of carbon tet.
But we con't talk about that one. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress

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On Tue, 23 Oct 2018 16:32:02 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That old precious Tapmatic stuff with the chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent worked very well indeed. And you can get stuff that works just as well today. It's made by CRC. It's called TrueTap EV. Instead of containing trichloroETHANE it contains trichloroETHYLENE. It says on the bottle that it works as well as the old stuff and it does as near as I can tell. Especially on 316 SS. Eric
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On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 11:43:55 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrot e:

he tap.

ive l

tapping

ls, which are the component that makes it stiff and pasty. It's the oil tha t makes good cutting lube. It used to be a common commodity because it was a cheap replacement for whale oil in lamps. The stearin was (and is) used i n making candles, but it hampers cutting by keeping the oil from wicking in to the cut.

good overall. I still use my old can of Buttercut, with was straight lard oil, for cutting ferrous metals on my lathe. I also use it for threading an d tapping in applications that aren't highly demanding. For those, I have a couple of precious cans of 40-year-old Tap Magic. And for threading hard s teel I still have a half-pint of carbon tet.

I'll have to keep that name handy. Thanks, Eric.
--
Ed Huntress

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wrote:

I can certainly remember when "lard oil" still used as a cutting lubricant.
--
Cheers

John B.
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On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 06:35:36 +0700, John B. Slocomb

I grew up using straight lard. We had the only pipe dies for twenty miles at the time when we got electric power and people discovered that they could have running water like the lucky family who had an elevated storage tank supplied by a water ram in a nearby stream.
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On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 06:35:36 +0700, John B. Slocomb

Me too, since I still use it.
Pete Keillor
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wrote:

Whatever works, Bob. ;)

I found myself needing my tapping machine and got it off the shelf, the first time in something like 7 years. Got it from Gunner. Well, I looked at the bottom of the rotatin' part and I'll be dodgammed if it weren't showing me a gaper. There was nothing to hook a tap into, just about a 3/4" hole.
Then I couldn't find my brand new bottle of TapMagic, so I settled for MMO, which worked extremely well. What a difference from dry. I got my 8 holes punched and threaded in the 0.5x1.25 cold rolled bar stock for extending the solar panel rack (Unistrut) Cold galved it and put 'er together with stainless hardware and anti-seize to last awhile.
--
"I have noticed even people who claim everything is predestined
and that we can do nothing to change it look before they cross
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On 10/23/2018 1:07 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:




Necessity is not the mother of invention...laziness is
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"Tom Gardner" wrote in message
On 10/23/2018 1:07 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

Necessity is not the mother of invention...laziness is
******** My mom told me my grandfather used to say if you want to find the easiest way to way to machine a part give the job to the laziest guy in the shop.
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