Pine trees cause rust?

I'm eventually going to be moving to a new house, set nearby a pine
plantation (pinus radiata). I've noticed that steel in the area seems to
suffer from surface rusting, more than expected from a place far from
the ocean.
Is it possible the pines have something to do with this?
It worries me a bit, thinking of the damage it might cause to my tools
etc. Would things kept indoors also be susceptible, or am I barking up
the wrong tree?
Jordan
Reply to
Jordan
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I live in a pine plantation (pinus resinosa) commonly called Norway or Red pine. I've not experienced unusual levels of rusting. It could be a case of shading causing morning dew to not burn off as quickly as a more open area.
Wes
Reply to
clutch
White Pine is a host of the rust disease that kills currants and gooseberries. Not the answer you wanted, I'm sure
Reply to
Karl Townsend
It's possible that the pollination is the problem. My own area has lots of spruce and cedar, these and pines give off so much pollen that I have to wash the house or it traps water and grows mildew (which, however, is NOT in the paint, just on the surface and washes off).
Salt spray also results in water retention on surfaces (the salt in a rust pit retards evaporation, so the pit stays damp and just rusts deeper). Either way, it's a water-retention issue.
Reply to
whit3rd
I grew up in the Southern Pine belt and never noticed any excessive rusting. It was fairly humid there, also.
Reply to
Gary Brady
I know they cause sore butts...ask any Christmas Angel!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
As long as they don't kill my raspberries and blackberries. Especially the blackberries.
Wes
Reply to
clutch
On Thu, 8 Mar 2007 21:36:33 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, "Tom Gardner" quickly quoth:
I'm sure glad I'd finished swallowing that sip of tea before reading this post, Tawm.
.-. Life is short. Eat dessert first! ---
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NoteSHADES(tm) laptop privacy/glare guards
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Glyphosate or ammonium sulphamate are the things to kill blackberries with. Once you've killed the brambles, you can plant some black currants and gooseberries :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
If I did that, my elderly mom would kick the chit out of me. My land, her blackberry patch.
Wes
Reply to
clutch
Yep ! They also cause radio problems to some extent. Years ago, Motorolan Phil "Bugs" Barnes authored an interesting paper on "RF and the Loblolly Pine". It seems the length of needles of that tree offer significant RF attenuation compared to other pines. The lengths of loblolly needles are "wavelength favorable" to Land Mobile UHF frequencies and thus attenuate RF more than others.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Not only pine needles, in the spring all the uhf customers would complain of poor coverage. The tree leaves in spring would do the same thing until the matured. At that time most of the uhf equipment ran off repeaters.
John
John
Reply to
John

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