Modelling trees

I am currently trying to model trees for my railroad. I've tried my hand using lichen and armatures from Woodland Scenics. But, truth be told I'm not happy with my results. Can anyone offer me some suggestions for working with the lichen, or other methods that will allow me to achieve more pleasing results?

Thank you in advance.

Brian

Reply to
Brian Smith
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Brian,

Super Trees have always been a favorite of mine. Try

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Jeff

Reply to
Jeff Hensley

Brian=A0Smith wrote: I am currently trying to model trees for my railroad. I've tried my hand using lichen and armatures from Woodland Scenics. But, truth be told I'm not happy with my results. Can anyone offer me some suggestions for working with the lichen, or other methods that will allow me to achieve more pleasing results?

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Here are a couple of sites with tree making:

Paul Templar's Tree Making:

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Bill Carl's Page:

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I have used WS armatures and their foam clusters with success. I stopped using lichen for trees years ago. I feel sure that you'll be successful with your tree making.

Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad:

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History of N Scale:
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Railroad Bookstore:
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to 1,000 sites:
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Reply to
Bill

Thank you Jeff.

Reply to
Brian Smith

Thank you, Bill

Reply to
Brian Smith

Brian,

I've made some of the WS trees but haven't used lichen on them.

Having said that, I found I got the best results by just applying the adhesive to the end parts of each branch, rather than just slathering it on everything above the trunk. Gave more of an open look.

Hope this helps.

Paul - "The CB&Q Guy" Modeling 1960's in HO.

Reply to
The CB&Q Guy

I wonder if that 'Hair today" crap comes in green - that'd work

:)

Steve

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Here are a couple of sites with tree making:

Paul Templar's Tree Making:

formatting link
Bill Carl's Page:

formatting link
I have used WS armatures and their foam clusters with success. I stopped using lichen for trees years ago. I feel sure that you'll be successful with your tree making.

Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad:

formatting link
History of N Scale:
formatting link
Railroad Bookstore:
formatting link
to 1,000 sites:
formatting link

Reply to
mindesign

Interesting Tom, thanks.

Brian

Reply to
Brian Smith

Thanks Paul, everything I hear/read is giving me a better grasp of the subject. What do you use for the foliage?

Brian

Reply to
Brian Smith

I've always found that dried plants and weeds are good for hardwoods. Use nature to imitate nature. And best of all, it's free; no further away than your nearest weedy area. Evergreens are a little more problematic.

For dense clusters of trees where only the foregound trunks and tops are visible, flowers of the genus Sedum work well when dried down. They're a very succulent stalk and leaves (almost like aloes) that *require* drying down before using on the pike. North American Prototype Modelers used this method over a large extent of the club's layout.

Seed pods of the plant Staghorn Sumac (rhus typhina; not to be confused with poison sumac, toxicodendrin something-or-other) can make a decent armature for evergreen, although finding a straight seed pod may be a bit of a challenge. Sumac is found all over the eastern half of the US, known for its brilliant scarlet color in fall.

Jay

website URL: members.aol.com/orphantrainlocos/index.html All the world's a stage - and everybody's a critic.

Reply to
JCunington

Thank you, Jay. I must have a look around in the summer.

Brian

Reply to
Brian Smith

Thanks Paul, everything I hear/read is giving me a better grasp of the subject. What do you use for the foliage?

Brian

```````` The trees I made were at a friend's house and we were using the Woodland Scenics stuff. I don't know what grade it was specifically. Possibly their "Clump Foliage". Someone else here probably knows for sure what the correct name is for the tree making foliage.

Glad I could help!

Paul - "The CB&Q Guy" Modeling 1969 In HO.

Reply to
The CB&Q Guy

Thanks again.

Reply to
Brian Smith

So your the guy that mentioned soaking steel wool in vinegar. I made up a batch and used it for staining some wood. I can't believe the penetration and coverage of this stain on wood. The moss material you mention my be what I use for my pine trees. See my web site for pine trees and tell me if it's the same.

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add needle detail with short snips of colored Jute twine.

coast(vancouver

Reply to
Arizona Rock & Mineral Co.

Hi Tom-

I have never tried this, but it sounds good -- can you give a 'formula', even if its only: chuck some steel wool into some vinegar.

Also, can you expand on the Saran wrap method?

Thanks, David

Reply to
David P Harris

Don't know about steel wool in vinegar but how pleasant to see you guys over there spelling "modelling" correctly as well as doing it so brilliantly!

Reply to
Ed Callaghan

How else would we spell modelling, Ed? {;^)

Brian

Reply to
Brian Smith

Well, Mozilla Thunderbird thinks modeling only has one "l"!

David

Brian Smith wrote:

Reply to
David P Harris

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