Ping Rob Fraser

Rob, Thanks for the info on the roll bar mount. The bar is part of a complete cage that I think is strong enough. Seeing as you build competition engines I have a question for you. I am
putting together a 1954 331 Hemi engine for use in a street rod that I hope to build someday. The machine shop that is doing the block work (decking, honing, etc.) just told me today that the crank is perfect except for the thrust surface which is on the #3 bearing in this engine. He is checking to see if a special bearing is available with a thicker thrust surface so that the crank can be machined and used. My question is: Can the crank be built up on this surface and ground so that the standard bearing can be used? Thanks...Mike DeAngelis
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and I'll be glad to help you out as much as I can. If you need any help on putting the engine together if the machine shop is not I can give you some pointers that will help prevent meltdowns.
Sounds like a great project!
Respects, Rob
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Rob Fraser wrote:

While we're on the subject of engines, do you have a recommendation for a reference book for a "normal" rebuild of a Chevy TBI 350 other than the factory service manual which I have? I'm not looking to do anything exotic, just going to tear my old full size blazer down to a pile of parts and see if I can rebuild / restore it. Just a low cost low pressure project to fiddle with. I've never torn into an engine that far before.
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The Chilton books available at your local parts house are decent for this, with pictures and stuff. Really, there isn't all that much to an engine. But being careful, CLEAN, CLEAN, CLEAN, and checking everything is critical. Some tips for non-experienced folk: 1. Get some good 3M masking tape and a sharpie. Tear off about 2" of tape and wrap it around every wire you disconnet and label it. 2. Get your digital camera out and take pictures of _everything_ before you start, and as you disassemble. 3. Get a box of Ziplock quart & gallon freezer bags and for every part you take off, put the bolts for that part in a separate bag and label it. (Exhaust bolts, head bolts, rod bolts, crank bolts, valve cover bolts, water pump bolts, etc). Put smaller items that you remove in the gallon bags and label them, especially support brackets and what not for the accessories. 4. For lifters, the tried and true egg carton works great as a storage device. 5. Clean _everything_. This takes the most time and effort if you do it right. I generally will also repaint everything, and even some stuff like brackets, that weren't factory painted. A good coat of engine paint or powder coat on those parts makes the engine stay cleaner longer, and it's easier to clean. 6. Check every part for wear/damage. 7. I recommend against reusing the following items: any bearing, pistons, rings, valve springs, rocker arms, push rods, valve guides, lifters and camshaft. I typically replace the valves too. All of these items are high cyclic parts that have a difinitive lifespan. I also put a new water pump on. It's much easier to replace while you have the engine apart, than a month after you get it back together.
--
Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Anthony wrote:

The factory service manuals in '90 were better than those of today on diagrams and detail, so I expect that I don't need the Chilton's manual.

Yep, I've rebuilt an ancient hydraulic steering valve before, I figure if I survived that I can survive an old 350.

I've got the diagrams and electronics is one of my specialties so I'm not too concerned about the electrical.

Yep, I've been using the dig camera like that for a long time. The camera phones are handy as well, particularly when you need to search for oddball parts, having the pic handy like that is nice.

I hear a piece of foam insul board is good as well, poke the bolts or whatnot into the foam and label with a sharpie.

I'll have to collect a few.

I plan to clean every part as I go, media blast exterior stuff as needed and repaint.

The engine has about 165k on it and was running fine when it went out of service so other than whatever in storage deterioration occurred, hopefully many parts are in decent shape.

Any suggestions on the best place to get parts kits?
I figure this project will keep me occupied at pretty low cost, and if I get it operational, the 16 MPG or the Blazer is better than the 11 MPG of the current truck.
Thanks,
    Pete C.
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Local parts store. Sealed Power will have a kit with everything in it, including gaskets. Some parts you will have to buy separate if you replace them, like valves.
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Anthony

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How much info do you want? Grab a copy of "How to rebuild your Small Block Chevy" by David Vizard Has a lot of info not in the service manual and pointers as well. I had a copy a long time ago.
http://www.themotorbookstore.com/resmchstvi.html looks interesting as well.
--
Steve W.

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"Steve W." wrote:

Will look for those.
Thanks,
    Pete C.
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