5C collet closing force

Does anyone have an idea of how much pulling force is required to hold a detail
in a 5C
collet?
As soon as it warms up, I'm going to make a drawtube. At the moment, I'm
thinking a
thrust bearing and hand wheel is how I will build it.
The right hollow shaft cylinder and a deublin coupler has something going for it
too.
Springs might work also, that seems to be how it is normally done commercially.
Thanks,
Wes

Reply to
Wes
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I normally run my air collet closer at 40 PSI. The cylinder it pushes on is about 5" OD minus the drawtube ID of about 2". I get around 15 sq in or 600 lb. force. this is only an approximation, I didn't take the closer apart for exact figures.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I probably have a couple 5C collet closers around here. Need one? Ive got some Dunhams kicking around. 19:1 holding pressure.
What are you trying to do with it?
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
That helps. Thanks
Wes
Reply to
Wes
detail in a 5C
My lathe came with a longer 5C handwheel closer from a larger lathe. I made a brass shouldered bushing to fit into the spindle and put a split shaft clamp and washers on the closer. That plain bearing was good enough until I cut a coarse thread in 1" stainless. To tighten it a little more I added a needle thrust bearing. The collet adapter lacks the guide pin but collets don't turn in it.
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Yup, likely I'm going with the handwheel for starts and I've done enough research to not even try this w/o rolling element bearings at the handwheel side.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
To be fair, the 5C square and hexagonal 5C holders that are sold for use as fixtures have either a simple toggle clamp or a 20tpi pin-spanner collar for clamping and they are perfectly adequate for the majority of turning and milling loads. Not up to holding a milling cutter though. So you might not need too much force. if the part is more than a few thou off size, that can make a big difference in the clamping force needed.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
What are you doing? Is this going to be one of your "Hold my beer and watch THIS!" moments?
Reply to
Buerste
Yeah, I've noticed my spin fixture seems to hold things okay but I'm rather light on the cutting forces. This is in milling apps. I know if I pushed it, the workpiece would move on me.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Nothing crazy, I've got a spindle adaptor to use 5C collets, just need a closer. How much force that is typically applied to hold stock in the 5C range of capacity is data I'd like to have filed away.
WEs
Reply to
Wes
closer. =A0How much
is data I'd like
The pin spanner on my 5C collet block set is 6-1/4" long. Hand tightening the steel / steel plain bearing isn't quite enough and usually I need to tap it with a rubber hammer to keep the work from slipping. On the lathe I pulled it pretty snug with two hands before adding the thrust bearing.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
How disappointing.
Reply to
Buerste
I have a clausing 6903, I have the adaptor to mate the spindle taper to a 5C collet. I also have a chunk of 4130 tubing to make the drawbar. Just want to make a closer. Most people make a hand wheel type but you never know what you might latch on to when you scrap out lines and such at work.
Now I have an idea of what force needs to be applied to hold a work piece.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes

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