Portable soldering iron recommendations?

My trusty Portasol has, apparently, given up the ghost. I don't use it very often, but when I need it (as I did yesterday), I expect it to work. Yeste
rday it did not. I filled it with butane, turned it on, and no gas flowed. The on/off switch feels kind of funky, and I suppose that after the 20 or s o years that I've had it, I can't complain.
So, today I went looking at Amazon, ebay, home depot, etc, and it seems lik e there's a pretty huge array, some good reviews and some horrible reviews for each of them.
I don't want to spend a LOT of money, but I don't want to but crap, either. Any suggestions would be welcome.
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I've got a couple butane soldering irons. They work ok, but recently I had to do a repair on an alarm panel (fusible link was blown) and didn't have one in the truck. Rather than a 45 minute trip (one way) back to the shop I stopped by a local Radio Shack and found one that operates on a couple AA batteries. Along with it I picked up a small roll of light (thin) rosin core solder. I also bought a pack of batteries to go in it, as I didn't expect them to last long. That soldering iron has seen half a dozen uses in the field now, and at the moment it sitting on my work bench because I just used to to make up some battery packs. It still has the first set of batteries in it. The pack I bought has come in handy, but so far not for that iron.
I would not use it to try and solder a T-tap in 12 ga electrical wire, but it does a great job for fine soldering of 22ga stuff, circuit boards, etc and its great in close quarters were I am not 100% certain of the flammability of the surrounding dust and the glow of a butane iron makes me nervous.
I don't know what its life actually is because I don't normally use it on the bench, but I've had it for over a year. Normally it rides around in my tool pouch in the truck.
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P.S. I think if I needed more heat and used it for longer at a time I would look for one of the old oversized Weller butane irons.
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P.P.S. I guess over a year isn't recently...LOL
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wrote:

I have one of those so-called "cold" soldering irons too - 2 AA batteries -and it is cold all right - have never been able to solder anything with the useless piece of junk.
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I don't know what a "cold" soldering iron is, and if the one I got said "cold" anywhere on it I would not have bought it.
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wrote:

Mine is made (or imported) by "coldheat" in Van Nuys California. It uses 4 AA batteries and it has 2 "carbon" electrodes, separated by a thin insulator. It only heats when the 2 carbons are shorted by the workpiece.
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 14:31:24 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I bought one to solder the 12ga wires in my attic when I put up the emergency lighting. It didn't even tin one wire by itself. Grrr.
They're good for anything up to 89 gauge wire and a 1-surface pad. Forget thru pads or anything real. <sigh>
Luckily, I got a buck more for mine when I sold it than I had paid on eBaaaah. <sheepish grinne>
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 18:43:18 -0800, Larry Jaques

Mine was a christmans gift from my daughter -
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 21:52:11 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

So sell it on eBay and buy one which works. She'll never know the difference. If she does, just tell her you buffed it out. Yeah, that's the ticket.
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wrote:

I was NOT talking about a "cold" soldering iron. The battery one I got is a regular iron, and it heats the tip when you hold the button slide forward. I still wouldn't use it for a 12 ga solder joint, but it works fine for small stuff. I suspect its around 15-20 watts based on how it performs. I used to have a low power 25 watt corded one back in the days before thin-net was affordable and ethernet was even known about to most people for making up 25 pin LapLink cables. We transferred a lot of data over a parallel port at about 400K with them. Heck, I sold a lot of parallel transfer cables for that matter. It wasn't elegant, but it worked.
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