Klaiber surface grinder, anyone?

Hi!
I seem to remember that someone has posted a link to a manual Klaiber
surface-grinder (that one was specifically a t&c-grinder). So chances are,
that someone has that Krautish crap*).
If so, I have a very specific question about the adjustment strip of the
table's dovetail.
*
)
This "tool" is stupid in a lot of details and crafted to Russian
agricultural equipment standards.
My only hope is, that it is in reality Made in Austria.
At least, it is making sparks now!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Loading thread data ...
That would be me Hey... thought you Germans were very patriotic ..
what're you doing knocking your own stuff .
my Klierber WS-1A is still in the shed waiting for me to get round to it .
formatting link
So haven't had chance to ascertain how good it is yet ...only fault so far is main motor not working.
other Krautish crap...but not so crap ...fritz werner universal milling machine to finish off first.
All the best...mark
Reply to
mark
Only for the good things. But I didn't get a Jung surface grinder for the same money. :-) And no, we are not patriotic, only proud of "Made in Germany". Patriotism involves the government/state, and then we are clearly no patriots.
Because they really didn't have any pride building that pile of iron. The plates that hold the felt for the way's protection look more like some drunken tried to drill it and needed 3 attempts. And a lot of other things. Mine is just the plain surface grinder (type unknown) with a much simpler table and the spindle has only one position.
Basic construction is the same. I also see, that mine is missing the right stop on the table that also engages the automatic traversal feed. This will be the least work to build a new one.
I'm a bit puzzled. That first photo in the link: Was it taken with the table to the leftmost position? 'Cause here is my problem: The adjustment strip for the tables dovetail is a mis-construction. The table looks like this in cross-section:
+---------------+ | | +-** ---+ / \ /___________\
Now the adjustment strip that sits in the lower mating guide is pressed (from the left) against the slanted surface of the dovetail and thus wanders upwards. Held in place by 8 M5 adjustment screws that happily bend. Where I have drawn the **, the small side of the adjustment strip is rubbing. Is this just with mine, or also with yours?
I know that some idiot has milled the dovetails and this might be the reason. All dovetails I can find here are constructed the other way round, so the strip's narrow side is not pressed against the moving counterpart. 8-/
Maybe it isn't that bad. :-)
I have the feeling that I have to add some electronic controll because cranking the table back and forth a zillion times by hand is not very exciting. Later. :-) Also, the helical gears on my grinder are quite worn out and don't move the table smooth. Think I'll throw that out and replace it with a toothed belt. Later. :-)
I'm currently adding a coolant system, because the dust is a nightmare. Will also build a cabinet-like thing with a shower curtain to keep the dust from spreading. And a vacuum cleaner to the left to catch a bit of the dust.
I think this is good old iron. :-))
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Hi Nick
I think it is central in the photo
It has a couple of separate t-slotted pieces that are bolted to the table
These can be moved so they overhang the table ...making the table an extra 8 inches long if so desired for long pieces of work...in the photo they are moved inboard of the edges.
The rest I cant answer until tomorrow.
On previous examination everything seemed nice and tight ...hardly any play in the handles and no play in the table.
But ....a big but ......all may be due to muck and grime gumming up the works ....after it's stripped cleaned ...put back together it may be as sloppy as diorea.....we will have to wait and see ...me thinks.
Don't know why , you are so worried about the dust ..if the nearest other machine is more than 2 metres away from it, you should not worry ...as grinding dust is heavy and don't float that far from home. a guard in the direction of the sparks is all that is needed..
When you compare this machine with similar British built basic machines of the same vintage ...think it's better built ...and more thought has gone into it .
As reguards the workmanship ....can only tell you how good that is when I strip it down.
all the best.mark
Reply to
mark
I'm aware of that. The t&c grinder has a much more versatile table than mine. Mine has just a plain simple table. And a magnetic table. :-)
That would be kind!
Not so with mine. All dovetails milled. I bet by some pre-owner who intended to "repair" it. Than he luckily found an idiot (me) to buy the wreck. So I had to scrape all guides. Took me more than half a year, including breaks when I lost nerves.
Lathe #1: 1m; Mill: 1.5m, Lathe#2: 2m, Shaper: 4m, Material stock: right in the direction of the sparks :-)
There are holes in the rear cover (extending the table; different to yours) for such a guard. It was missing. But that guard also would collide with the motor and the V-belt cover. Have to model one out of cardboard to see how it has to look like. Also tried with coolant yesterday, but the mess I made withing fractions of a second was overwhelming. :-) There is a hole in the disk guard for coolant, but it is pointing in the wrong direction. All grinding disks either require or recommend using coolant.
The t&c model looks very versatile, no doubt!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
here you go hope there is enough pics for you here
if you need any closer shots of anywhere else just say.
formatting link
all the best....mark
Reply to
mark
*GREAT*! Thanks a lot!
On picture #16 (), I see that the narrow side of the adjustment strip is ribbing on the table. That long triangular-shaped sign of wear. Right?
So I have to make a new one, because mine was attacked with an angle-grinder to make it lower/narrower. Doesn't make a real smooth surface. Anyhow, I have a surface grinder to make his new strip.
I have downloaded all pictures, in case I ever decide to improve my Klaiber. Your's is really much more versatile than mine.
No, thanks, they answered all my questions. And even more.
Thanks again!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
yep that triangular shape is wear ...but not as we know it ...and it don't make any difference ... the strip springs up a little as the machine travels to the extremes of movement .. the strip is approx 1mm short in height than it could be
so only to be expected the strip gets dragged a little ... the strip is there for wear in the lateral plain of the table ...to take up play in the table dovetails
the wear for down-woulds push of the table is taken by the wide surfaces at the side of the jib...........
my Jones and shipman 540 does not have any jibs what so ever and the table isn't attached to the lower parts at all ....only the rams keep it from falling off.
same idea with this machine.....and lots of other surface grinders ...some have loose ball bearngs on the ways ...
all the best..mark
Reply to
mark
[snip
Is this the one that you have been scraping in? If so, congratulations on getting it running.
Wes
Reply to
clutch
If the small side of the strip touches the upper table, things get better a bit. Taking some flex out of the adjusting screws.
No matter how, I have to make a new strip. The original was bowed to get the play out. I have bent it straight, but certainly not perfectly flat. Also with the huge gap between the casting and the strip, the oil from the oiler will never go where it has to go. Not very clever that construction.
That's a common concept for surface ginders. But then, the lower part of the dovetail is (or should be) as long as the table *plus* the travel. Not so with my Klaiber. The lower part is shorter than the table. So gravity works, but not in a desired way. :-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Yes, it is! :-)))
I also have made photos and already written something (in German) about scraping. Waiting a bit what questions come up and then I will finally write my "Beginners guide to scraping" and put it on the net.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
The only advice i can give you about gib strips is make them out of iron or black mild steel ...the hot rolled scailey stuff Then surface grind them perfect ..turning them over after every pass
The cold rolled expensive shiny stuff will end up like a banana when you take it off the magnet ..no ,matter how careful you are .
Well... that's the results I've had with the stuff . So go to your local fab shop and buy for buttons and get better results . :)
The surface grinder has saved me a ton of money ..almost everything i make is just fab shop mild steel ....that i clean and square up on the surface grinder ...and almost always turns out perfect.
all the best.mark
all the best.mark
Reply to
mark
I intended to harden and temper it (if it fits into my oven). Something like C45.
Thanks, I know. CRS is fun if so thin and taking off just on one side.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I thought about writing "Beginners Guide To Scrapping". I seem to have quite a knack in making scrap.
Archie
Reply to
Archie
mmmm....... better the strips wear out, than what they are rubbing against.
all the best.mark
Reply to
mark
If you need to use cold rolled steel for a machined part then normalize it first. Take it up to red heat for 2min/mm of thickness and then let it cool in the open air...ish.
It has worked for me every time I've had to machine cold rolled mild steel, except the first one.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Thanks, I know and do. 600°C, cool down 50° / h. But never checked how much better it gets. Some say, it still bends. Anyhow, it's a good procedure to mill off the same amount on both sides in two passes.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I am looking forward to reading that. I'll even struggle through it in German using babblefish if need be.
Wes
Reply to
clutch
Made a dressing-diamond holder yesterday that goes onto the magnetic table. Really simple and not worth showing. But what did I get today? For free? Without initial warning? "Oh! look, do you want to take that with you?". A dressing attachment that goes directly to the wheel-head. Fits nice when I have drilled 3 new holes and scraped (here it is again) the dovetails of that dresser. The axis can be fine-adjusted to be parallel to the table. Only thing missing was the diamond. Should I complain?
Sparks are getting better. But still a lot to learn, repair and adjust ...
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.