precision matthews 10x27 lathe

does anybody have any thoughts on this lathe? im coming from a jet 9x20.
just a hobby but need better quality that the jet, the jet has been a good
start...thanks tony
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Reply to
Tony
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What makes you think its better quality than a Jet? They are both Chinese imports.
Though..just about anything would be an improvement over some of the 9x20s Ive seen.
If you are going to spend upwards of $1800..why not get a decent piece of US made iron? A nice Clausing for example?
Or a Southbend
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Or
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or....etc etc
Btw...when you start getting in the 13-14" and up in lathe sizes..the machines from China are pretty decent. They were made for industrial use, not light hobby use and are fairly well made
Gunner
The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.
In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.
Theodore Dalrymple,
Reply to
Gunner
well mainly its new and free shipping. most of the tooling online is NOt in florida. so either drive along way up north or get something reasonable. yea i know its an import, but it looks like a bettter import, all the bolts on the 9x20 are soft junk, you align it and several days later its cutting a taper again...on and on with the problems. it was a good intro into turning....thanks for the reply tony
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Reply to
Tony
Tony,
I think you can get a better lathe for the money, but not a new one, and not with the service you can expect from Machine Tool Online. I'm in Pittsburgh, so, if you want a first-hand appraisal (bearing in mind that I don't claim to be an expert), I've been looking for an excuse to stop by the warehouse.
Kevin
Reply to
Kevin Singleton
Any place to get an operating manual for pm1027
Reply to
Brian230
Yeah, Precision Mathews still exists.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joe Gwinn
And Matt is great at support. If its available he will help you get it.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
They can't help me
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Is this similar?
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I think so. My issue is with the gearing for thread making. Would all similar lathes have the same gear setup. Thank for all the help.
Reply to
Brian230
I think so. My issue is with the gearing for thread making. Would all similar lathes have the same gear setup. Thank for all the help.
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If the spindle and leadscrew turn at the same rate the lathe will cut the pitch/modulus of the leadscrew. To cut other threads the gearing must match the pitch ratio. To be "similar" another lathe needs the same pitch leadscrew and same tumbler gear ratio.
It helps to list the prime factors in increasing order for each gear's tooth count, such as 24 = 2*2*2*3. Some of the gears in a set are for only one pitch and needn't be considered for others, for example a 52 tooth gear (2*2*13) is only for 1/2-13, and 54 is for 27 TPI.
If you find a 37 and 47 tooth gear, they are an approximate metric-inch conversion. The correct but inconveniently large size is 127 tooth.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Thanks I have a manual for a pm 1022 hopefully between the two I will understand.
Reply to
Brian230
Thanks I have a manual for a pm 1022 hopefully between the two I will understand.
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It's fairly simple mental math once you understand the transformations and relationships. I preserved my understanding in a spreadsheet, which allowed me to experiment with metric conversion of my inch lathe by automatically converting pitch to modulus and multiplying by the x/127 conversion ratios. 100/127 is the standard but 120/127 gave me more fine optics threads.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Thanks Jim once I get it all cleaned up and use it a bit it will make more sence of it. I appreciate your efforts and time to help me understand.
Reply to
Brian230
Thanks Jim once I get it all cleaned up and use it a bit it will make more sence of it. I appreciate your efforts and time to help me understand. -------------
I tried to learn machining and welding from books but night school classes in them were more helpful, to correct my beginner's mistakes and enable me to figure out the used lathe and mill I bought. Machining and welding require a feel for how hard you should/can push that doesn't come across in writing or video. They are examples of the saying that good judgment comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgment. Luckily for me the worst judgment I've learned from was someone else's, and I could wash off the blood and burn marks. The scarred carriage of my ex trade school lathe is a reminder to stay alert.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
And often requires some relearning when going from one machine to another. For example the little mill drill in the back takes a careful hand on the wheel, but the South Bend 1028F can go "almost" as fast as I can push it with the same material.
I could get work done with careful work, prep, chamfering, and ground bevels on the little Century wire feeder, but it took all day. The Miller 212 will weld heavier plate with cursory prep at ten times the speed.
The other thing is every machine has quirks. On the CB1028F, I've learned if I go under positive dimension by two tenths on the DRO and then snug the table locks it goes to dead on. There is no way to learn that except by using that machine or talking to somebody who has. (I'm not saying the machine is inherently that accurate or precise in net results.)
The skills translate, but the brain has to drive the skills or things go bad quickly.
As an aside note. My son can't seem to setup a welder for a job very well, but once I dial it in he has a much better hand at it. He took welding classes. I learned the numbers out of a book and off the Internet. To be fair he doesn't weld much these days, and he is slowly learning when he does how to adjust the machine from the flip chart settings based on symptoms and performance.
I have lots of good judgement. LOL. Why just yesterday I gained some more when I realized the 3D geometry I was CNC machining wasn't lined up with the 2D limit geometry. Today I get to do it right.
Reply to
Bob La Londe

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