Problems with air conditioner

It was pretty easy to see who was posting from rcm and who was posting from the HVAC (Highly Vulgar Asshat Clowns) group.
Groups other than RCM trimmed.
Wes S
Reply to
clutch
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Quoting: "Could this be the fan motor? I have a multimeter and know how to use it. Is there a way to diagnose this problem myself."
Use the ohms scale. Spotting an obvious open or short isn't all that complicated. Some VOM also have a scale for farads.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Probably a bad fan capacitor. Goodman is noted for bad caps. Just replace it, and be happy. Replace both of htem to be sure. Compressor caps go bad, also.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Sure, take the cover off and see if there is voltage on the fan motor terminals.
That buzzing, does it seem like the compressor is running?
Poke around with a multimeter and you will likely have your answer soon.
If you have a clamp on ammeter, you can try to find out how much current g goping through the wires, that would also help answer a question whether the compressor pump is running.
Be careful, but not fearful.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus18860
Hey. He's not in a profit situation; he wants a reliable unit. If one cap has failed, the other is probably drying out, and might need replacement soon. They are inexpensive, compared to the effort and time of pulling the unit apart. Why NOT change both while you have it apart?
The only thing I'm confused over concerning this post was the size of the unit vs its configuration. It's only a one ton unit, but it's a split (not window unit). I'm not familiar with your locale, so this may be geographical bias. But the smallest unit we can buy around here (Florida) in split configuration is a two-ton.
Condenser fans are prone to failure for a number of reasons -- often motor installers (even the original manufacturers) will forget to take out the weep plugs, and they corrode from accumulated rain water. But usually if anything else but the cap goes bad, the shaft will get sticky or seize. The outside fan relay might also be bad -- or one of the crimps on wiring from the control board to the motor, or from the motor to the cap(s).
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Any thoughts on why the HVAC types seem to suffer from these paranoid personality disorders that are rarely seen from other trades? Brain damage due to oxygen depletion from all the Freon they used to dump?
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
BECAUSE THERE'S ONLY ONE, ASSHOLE !!!!!
Seeing as you've just PROVED how ignorant you are .....
SHUT THE FUCK UP !!!!!!
Reply to
.p.jm
If it's not a window unit, it's a split?? I still don't get what a split is.
There's a compressor just like mine in the trash right now. 27 years old. Should I go to the trouble to take out the condensor, the fan motor, the "contactor" or anything else? Normally I would just do so, but it's alreay about 98 degrees and I don't feel like it.
Reply to
mm
I've cruised their group before and all I can tell you is that they think they have a God given right to pick your pocket down to the lint.
Wes S
Reply to
clutch
Who's the asshole? The compressor doesn't have a cap, too?
You didn't read the posts... someone suggested changing the compressor cap while he was at it, and I agreed. I know perfectly well how many caps a PSC motor has.
You must have a serious sense of inadequacy to go calling names instead of posting constructive answers.
If the shoe fits, I guess. It doesn't take much high-level technical know-how to get to the point of being able to repair hvac equipment. You guys had to protect your trade status with all the silly EPA stuff. Now it costs the serious tinkerer a couple-hundred bucks to go take the EPA certificate tests so he can accidentally blow Freon into the air just like you do every day on purpose. (sure, he's GOT a reclaimation station... ask him if he knows how to turn it on).
BTW... could YOU scratch-build your own thermistor-based vacuum gauge for refrigeration work and calibrate it? I did, and I know several HSMs here on the metalworking group who have the skills. Bet not ONE of you could. Could you build a diffusion pump? Bet you don't even know what one is.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Lloyd, I am interested in making a "deep vacuum" gauge, for up to fractions of a micron. My vacuum pump can supposedly go down to one micron, IIRC. (nothing fancy, it is a small Sargent-Welch DuoSeal pump, but it would be interesting to measure vacuum accurately)
i
Reply to
Ignoramus18860
Yeh - and do you know what a DUAL CAP IS ?????
Fuck off, bitch, and shove your little ad-hoc psychoanalysis up your ass.
Reply to
.p.jm
Large fractions of a micron aren't really "deep vacuum" like you'd obtain with an oil diffusion pump backed with a cold baffle and a really fresh vane pump. But that's still pretty high. You're talking better the range of what a good, new Robinaire refrigeration pump can do (down to ... oh... 20 microns, or so).
For your range, thermistor gauges are well-suited. Here's a good writeup of one that will measure down to 0.5u:
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However, he doesn't go into calibration very much. Borrow a couple of commercial gauges, and average their readings to do that. With a small manifold and carefully assembled, leak-free fittings, you should be able to pull down and scour your new gauge within an hour or so of pumping.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I'm taking a wag on this but I think a split is one where the cooling coils (evaporator) are separated from the compressor / condensor system.
Typical home would be compressor/condensor outside on pad, refrigerent plumbed inside to/from cooling coils in furnace.
Wes S
Reply to
clutch
Yep, and many units have separate condensor and compressor caps, in case your vast experience hasn't exposed you to that, yet. Many PSC air-over condensor fans have cap pigtails so short you can't get them back into the weather enclosure, anyway... you have to hang the cap inside the condensor area, or scab wiring onto them to get back home.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

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