Propane BBQ regulator

I would like to ask for an advice on installing a needle valve (made for
LPG) in to BBQ.
I need to lower the temp on my BBQ from about 275F (present min setting)
down to 225F to do some slow cooking. By opening tank valve with knob-valves
open I can trip safety on my tank regulator in to slow flow what gives me
about 180F but it is non adjustable and can not be increased. I am thinking
about installing needle valve (have one) but I am not sure if this let me
adjust the propane flow so I can regulate temperature in the range lower
than my present minimum. And where would be the better place to install the
needle valve - between the tank and the existing fixed regulator (high
pressure side) or between existing fixed regulator and the knob valves (low
pressure side)?
Thank you for response.
Reply to
Darek Fisk
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I believe I would refrain from cutting down the propane feed too much as the flame *could* easily be blown out - and unless you have some kind of temperature safety device on the grill, you would fill the area with propane gas - waiting to be ignited. Even with my grill on low, there isn't much flame and a hefty breeze *could* possibly blow out the flame. I would think you would be better off with thermostatically controlled electric element. Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
Second that, Ken! Better to not mess with a propane regulator.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Its your funeral, so, if you decide to do it,put the valve on the downstream side of the regulator. The pressure will be constant, so the flow will vary with the opening of the valve. Just put out your cigarette befor you chek it each time as you could achiev orbit if the flame has gone out and you light it when the thing is full of gas.
Reply to
Tom Miller
If you want to lower the temp below minimum you really need a smaller burner so the flame doesn't go too low. Maybe replace the big burner with a bunsen burner?
Reply to
Nick Hull
Well, if you were to use the same burners then the needle valve should be placed after the the regulator and before the valve in the BBQ. But, the burners and valves are made to operate at a minimum pressure. The gas must exit the orofice with sufficient velocity to mix properly with the air. If the gas moves too slow then the flame won't burn very clean. Can you instead remove one of the orofices and shrink the hole? It probably has a brass orofice. Using a small ball bearing placed over the hole and tapping it gently with a hammer will reduce the orofice diameter. If it was me, I'd go to the store and buy a cheap, small BBQ and remove the burner and valve assembly. Then, mounting this assembly in you larger BBQ should give you a burner system designed to have a lower BTU output and still burn properly. Also, since you would be using a complete system there should be less chance of the burner blowing out at the low setting, which could, and probably will in a windy spot, happen if you run the larger burners much lower than their designed output. If you don't think any of these solutions can be done by yourself and still insure safety then maybe an electric burner would be best for you to use. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Instead of risking life and limb by messing with your regulator and gas supply, why not try propping the lid of your grill open a small amount to bleed off some of the excess heat? Experiment to get it right. If you're also concerned about the direct heat from the flame, that can be controlled by placing your food over an unlit burner and/or using aluminum foil or a tray under your food.
Or, you could get yourself a nice charcoal-fired grill for some really tasty slow-cooking!
- Michael
Reply to
DeepDiver
Since you say you can drop the temperature to 180 degrees, it sounds as if you ought to be able to accomplish a 225 degree level. I don't understand exactly how you are doing this. My barbeque is simple minded and has no safety features.
Some barbeque regulators have a cap that can be removed and the pressure setting of the regulator changed. You might check that.
Dan
Darek Fisk wrote:
Reply to
dcaster
I think I would just plug every other hole in the burner (maybe small pop-rivets?) so you have half as many flames... and leave the regulator alone. You can always (carefully) drill the rivets out if you need more heat... or add more if you need less heat. David
Reply to
David Courtney
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install the
Best option would be to install a smaller burner. I did this in my Weber by using the parts from a cheap Coleman stove, used one burner and can drop the temp in my Genesis down to a constant 200 with no problem. Also am adding a smoker unit to the side of it so I can used solid wood as well as gas in the same grill.
Reply to
Steve W.
Smokers do this all the time. My smoker has a burner about the size of my fist. That is a large cast ring of fire. The input air - funnel - naturally!
I have a valve below the regulator - as all BBQ's do - and it is adjusted for the 200's normally to do smokes. It is a small 'tower' tube design.
I think the head must stay hot and able to self start any live gas that might get out.
The whole burner is in a wind proof column of air.
The flame runs long when running it up - but once hot - it is cut back and is blue.
Martin
Reply to
lionslair at consolidated dot
| > I would like to ask for an advice on installing a needle valve (made for | > LPG) in to BBQ. | > I need to lower the temp on my BBQ from about 275F (present min setting) | > down to 225F to do some slow cooking. | | Instead of risking life and limb by messing with your regulator and gas | supply, why not try propping the lid of your grill open a small amount to | bleed off some of the excess heat? Experiment to get it right.
Yes, I do it at times I don't use wood to get smoked flavor. Lifting the cover removes most of smoke as I run very light (almost invisible) smoke.
I If you're | also concerned about the direct heat from the flame, that can be controlled | by placing your food over an unlit burner and/or using aluminum foil or a | tray under your food.
Yes, I use indirect cooking by igniting the burner to the side of the food but for fish it is still to hot unless I trip the regulator.
| | Or, you could get yourself a nice charcoal-fired grill for some really tasty | slow-cooking! | | - Michael
I know it is not real BBQ but because of ease of use I would prefer to stick to propane.
Reply to
Darek Fisk
| Since you say you can drop the temperature to 180 degrees, it sounds as | if you ought to be able to accomplish a 225 degree level. I don't | understand exactly how you are doing this. My barbeque is simple | minded and has no safety features.
It is a newer type regulator. If I open knob-valves first and then turn valve on the tank open, regulator senses this and restricts flow of propane but does not cut it completely off. The flame runs fine with no incidents of going out and temp on the grid keeps steady at 180F. But it is non adjustable because pressure [flow?] at this point is below controlling capacity of knob-valves and factory regulator is cramp-assembled.
| | Some barbeque regulators have a cap that can be removed and the | pressure setting of the regulator changed. You might check that. | | Dan | | Darek Fisk wrote: | | > I need to lower the temp on my BBQ from about 275F (present min setting) | > down to 225F to do some slow cooking. By opening tank valve with knob-valves | > open I can trip safety on my tank regulator in to slow flow what gives me | > about 180F but it is non adjustable and can not be increased. | | > Thank you for response. |
Reply to
Darek Fisk
It is an option I would consider. It involves more work and investment but it is worth a try. Many thanks to you and to everybody on this group for your input.
I"Steve W." wrote in message Inews:42cab8ae$1 snipped-for-privacy@spool9-west.superfeed.net... | Best option would be to install a smaller burner. I did this in my Weber | by using the parts from a cheap Coleman stove, used one burner and can | drop the temp in my Genesis down to a constant 200 with no problem. | Also am adding a smoker unit to the side of it so I can used solid wood | as well as gas in the same grill. | | | |
Reply to
Darek Fisk
Since it runs fine at this much lower level, I can't see why you would need a smaller burner. I think you can just put the valve in the line after the regulator. You probably don't need anything as fancy as a needle valve. A stopcock should work well.
Dan
Darek Fisk wrote:
Reply to
dcaster

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