Question about the HIP process

I was reading in Nasa Tech Briefs about Electron Beam Melting (EBM) being used to make near net and net parts out of titanium alloys.
Other alloys have been used to make parts, aluminum being one, but the titanium alloys and CP titanium seem to be the predominant metals being used. After the parts come out of the EBM machine they are subjected to Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). the HIP process closes up any micropores in the EBM fashioned part. When an aluminum alloy is cast and then run through a rolling mill the structure is changed significantly. This wrought alloy behaves much differently than the same alloy as cast . My question is whether the HIP process changes the alloy so that it behaves more like a wrought alloy or if basically remains the same, just denser. Thanks, Eric
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On Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:04:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

HIPping just squeezes the metal. It doesn't do a lot to the microstructure.
However, there are wide variations in the microstructure of different alloys and their response to cold- or warm-working, aluminum being a strong example. The alloys that we use in wrought form, such as 5052 and, to a lesser extent, 6061, are like frozen chewing gum in their cast form. They need to be worked to develop useful properties.
That being said, 6061 can be cast, even at home. It's just not going to be as strong as the wrought form.
If you're interested in EBM, you'll find the emerging business of laser-melting to be interesting. It's a "3D printing" process with powdered metal, but, unlike sintering, it achieves close to 100% density.
--
Ed Huntress

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