Rating garage door wind reinforcement

I'm considering having Genie install reinforcement on my garage door to hold up better should we ever get hit by a hurricane. They can do it
for around $400, which could be more cost effective than replacing the whole door. The door is probably close to 20 yrs old. Is there any resource for rating the effectiveness of such reinforcements? We live on Florida's gulf coast where code now requires W5 120mph garage doors.
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On 18 Jul 2006 10:30:48 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

==========Try to get a look at an installation and see what it is that you are buying. Slotted angle iron, L mending plates, and carrage bolts are cheap, and if this is what it is, then you can do the job *MUCH* cheaper yourself with parts from Lowes or HD. In fact you may decide to double up on the reinforcing and get a much better job for less money.
Considering the apparent increase in strength/frequency of the storms, you may want to consider getting some heavy structural plywood and creating some quick install "shutters."
Unka George (George McDuffee)
There is something to be said for government by a great aristocracy which has furnished leaders to the nation in peace and war for generations; even a democrat like myself must admit this. But there is absolutely nothing to be said for government by a plutocracy, for government by men very powerful in certain lines and gifted with the "money touch," but with ideals which in their essence are merely those of so many glorified pawnbrokers.
Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), U.S. Republican (later Progressive) politician, president. Letter, 15 Nov. 1913.
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Beware that any hardware you install permanently on the door increases the lifted mass, which means you have to upgrade the lifting apparatus with heavier springs. Do they include this? A garage door technician is going to charge you $100s just for that.
I have a similar situation here in Palm Beach County with three 30-year- old wood garage doors not wind rated.
My solution was to just buy a 10-foot Superstrut for each door and make a temporary reinforcement out of it, vertically in the middle of the door, anchored to the concrete floor below and concrete beam above. This adds not just panel strength, but cuts the acting distance in half, and two solid anchors to the structure. This has to be stronger than just reinforcing the door. Only disadvantage is that you have to install and deinstall it, like hurricane shutters, and you can't use the door.
In the event, I didn't install the struts even though I brought them home. I just backed up the car bumpers to the door. A little scary to watch, but this was all that was needed through 3 direct hits in the last 2 seasons.
Hurricane hardware has turned into a theiving racket in Florida. You would think it would be more democratically open and free. For example, aluminum window shutters, which are just ordinary aluminum sheets run through a corrugating roller jig that costs about $20K, are sold for many multiples of the aluminum market price, solely because the building code specifies not physical/structural requirements (gage of sheet, bending shape), but government testing requirements, which is to say, some one favorite company that literally alone passed the government "test". You can't just make solid stuff and sell it (legally).
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I not only backed the cars up to the doors (I rolled them back by hand), I used motorcycle tie down straps to tie the garage doors down to the car. I fastened the lower ends of the tie down straps to the steel loops under the rear of the cars that are used to tie the cars down on the car transporter. Worked for 2 hurricanes so far....Joel in Florida =================Richard J Kinch wrote: .....

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Wow...that's an idea! Can you give me a visual description that's a little clearer, or advise me of any diagrams/photos online, so I better understand how you guys set that all up with the cars? Thanks!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How about this.... I'm planning on doing this in the very near future...
This is a link to the first page, discussing reinforcing the track: http://www.stormsurvival.homestead.com/Garage_Door_Track_Bracing.html
And this is a link to a page about reinforcing the door itself. http://www.stormsurvival.homestead.com/Garage_Door_Bracing.html
No need to worry about adding additional load to the doors. Seems like the way to go to me!
Brad

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This guy is glib but he is just repeating factoids. Hurricane winds do not create suction (and even if they did, the door track would not be the point of failure), nor do garage door springs require "special tools".
Nevertheless, his vertical bracing is a sound idea in principle, although his use of lumber is naive. Go with the Superstrut for this.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

OK, thanks. I was a bit concerned about the ability of the 2x4s to withstand the force without bowing in. My garage doors made it through Hurricane Rita last year, but seeing them "pulse" inward when the winds got around 100mph made me nervous.
So you think the bracing technique is a decent one? Just replace the wood with Superstruts? I searched on the web for Superstruts and got a few hits, but no good site. Looks like the kind of materials we have in our cable trays, etc. Is this the right material? Where would I buy this stuff? Graybar, Grainger's, Home Depot?
Thanks again for the advice. I want to get this knocked out soon...
Brad
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Home Depot and Lowes hide it on the electrical aisle.
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So, is there a design in which one can install the struts by "sliding" them into place without having to screw in several bolts on each strut every time a hurrricane comes by? (Just trying to work smarter, not harder...)
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