garage door lubricant

What is a good lubricant for garage door rollers

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/11/2015 7:18 AM, Dicker wrote:

jesus - could you possibly be more passive about obtaining information?
https://www.google.com/search?q=garage+door+roller+lubricant&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/11/2015 9:21 AM, Neville M. Wiles wrote:

I recently used the 3 in 1 garage door lube from Lowes. All I can add is, my wife's comment.
"What did you do to the garage door, it's so quiet!"
All I could say is, I spent half the afternoon working on it, but I got it quieted down, for you dear. :-)
Mikek
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The non-engine lubricant business, like many other commodity businesses, has made target-market differentiation its main method of marketing. The idea is to take a commodity and claim that it's made specifically for some special purpose. Kingsford Competition Briquettes are one of my favorite examples. <g>
If they described it functionally, it would be something like "Garden variety lubricant suitable for low-grade bearings that wobble around with atrocious clearances in misaligned channels, and may have to run with dirt of various kinds, including cat droppings. Prevents screeching, howling, and absolute freezing of said low-grade bearings, until it doesn't."
Give 'er another squirt, and see if it will spin...
--
Ed Huntress

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Give them a little more credit than that.
the stuff is in a spray can, so they get points for ease of application vs the complete garbage plastic oilers that 3 in 1 comes in now. All those things do it drip oil everwhere but where you need it.
I botched up a screw drive garage door opener with a lube that well, was a bit too thick. Took a while to clean all the crap off and apply the right oil or lube it needed. Whoops.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 22:30:45 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

What did you apply, 30-weight? <g>
Some years ago I had an interesting conversation with the VP of industrial lubricants at Exxon-Mobil. I think I reported it here. It helped get me down to earth regarding lubricants, additives, and special applications.
I suppose you know that all "synthetic" oils are made from petroleum oil.
--
Ed Huntress

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

not sure what it was, but it seemed like the right choice at the time.

So is some vinegar. The additives do make a difference, and I do agree that there are too many types of lubricants to even shake a stick at these days, all of which claim to be the best thing ever created. The differences while subtle do exist and for the case of a garage door rollers anything would probably work fine in the end. Other applications could be fussier.
I do keep over a dozen types of oils and greases around for various things. Each have their purpose, for instance the Cameron drill press, scissors and old camera shutters only get Nyoil, which is just fancy pure mineral oil. I never add teflon filled oils to motor bearings, locks get graphite and so forth, super lube for general purpose use blah blah. No doubt everybody has their favorites as well. Bike people get real crazy about chain lubricants.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 23:50:52 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

Yeah. The basic point was that synthetic motor oils, which are derived from petroleum oils -- cracked into components and then re-combined in a controlled way-- are much more lubricious than conventional petroleum oils. Beyond that, the differences between motor oils and machine oils are not commonly understood.
You know that grease is just oil with metallic soaps in it to make it thick and pasty. You may know that the true weight of multi-viscosity oils actually is the lower value: 10W-40 actually is 10-weight oil. The additives that give it the multi-vis property really don't alter the viscosity of the oil. Those additives actually are polymers that swell up when they're heated. What they do is increase the gap between journals and bearings *as if* the oil was thicker. The polymers just swell with heat and keep the gap open.
Most of the additives in motor oil have no effect on the oil's properties for other uses. Anti-foam, rust protection, and anti-acid (anti-corrosion) components do almost nothing until they're activated. The detergents and dispersants only come into play in *closed* lubricating systems, where the oil it recycled through the machine. In a plain-spindle-bearing lathe, which is a "total loss" lubricating system, they have no noticeable affect. In a system that recycles, you can use motor oil as long as you change the oil when it gets dirty. The lubricating effects won't change. The additives won't do any damage. You can have a problem if you've used non-detergent oil in a machine or engine for years and then switch to deterget oil, because the semi-jelled glorp can come off in lumps big enough and hard enough to block oil passages.
All of this came up, and prompted me to call Exxon-Mobil, from a comment by former member Jim Rozen that he had switched his company's South Bend plain-bearing 10L lathe to Mobil 1 motor oil - 0W-20, I think. He said the spindle ran cooler and allowed higher speeds. Like me, he had been lubing it with South Bend spindle oil.
I talked to the E-M VP about it, and she said, first, it's the same oil as their industrial synthetic, aside from the additives, and that those additives make no difference in a total-loss system. She thought 0W-20 would be fine in that application.
This prompted me to ask about other applications, and she said it was generally the same story: synthetic lubricates much better, and the additives in motor oil won't matter for almost all applications except those that recycle the oil. As for viscosity, make sure it's thin enough to get into the bearing area and thick enough to minimize metal-to-metal contact.
So I stopped driving to my mill supply to stock a few different weights of machine oil. I use synthetics in my cars, and I just save the remains, turning the cans upside-down overnight and then pouring the last bit into my all-purpose pump oil can.
I did buy a can of 0W-20 to use in the spindle of my furnace blower motor. I use the heavier stuff on my garden tools and the joints of my pocket knives. My honing oil is still 10% motor oil and 90% kerosene, as it has been for close to 60 years, and the motor oil for that is whatever is lying around.
--
Ed Huntress

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, June 11, 2015 at 6:58:19 PM UTC-4, Ed Huntress wrote:

I am not too sure about that statement. Does that include silicon oil? And how about the oil for use with 410a refrigerant? And then there is the oil with iodine in it. And the transmission oil made with jojoba oil.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 17:16:25 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

I don't know, but I doubt it. Silicone is a whole other kettle of fish. I was speaking of motor oils.

Again, I was speaking of motor oils.
--
Ed Huntress

>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

"Made from petroleum oil" can mean that the synthetic oil is based on chemicals originally derived from petroleum, such as ethylene and its relatives. Plastics are also "made from petroleum". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethylene
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 22:29:21 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Right. That was the sneaky point. d8-)
They crack it down, and then re-synthesize it to make "synthetic" motor oil. And the result is worth it.
This comes up from time to time because I once had a boss who was proud of the fact that she used synthetic motor oil in her Benz, thus avoiding the use of petroleum. She was really let down when I explained it to her.
--
Ed Huntress

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 18:58:13 -0400, Ed Huntress

Actually quite a bit is made from natural gas - - - And in South Africa they made it from coal during apartheid when they were embargoed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 23:18:14 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Are you sure they make synthetic motor oil from gas? I know it's a common source of ethylene, but I'm not sure about what molecules they use to assemble Mobil 1.
--
Ed Huntress

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 23:42:33 -0400, Ed Huntress

Hydro-carbon gas is a many slandered substance, but when you talk about "pipe line" gas it is usually mostly Ethane and Methane. In Indonesia they use "gas" to make fertilizer but I'm not sure whether they are using strictly ethane-methane of something richer.
--
cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since neither of those (nor other natural has) contains significant amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus or potassium, there must be more to the story than that one sentence reveals.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13 Jun 2015 01:08:44 -0300, Mike Spencer

I'm not a chemist so I can't argue one way or the other. All I can say is that I know of two "fertilizer plants" in Indonesia that made fertilizer from natural gas. I seem to remember the "Habor, or maybe Haber, process" being mentioned.
--
cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

The Haber Process turns nitrogen from the air and hydrogen from natural gas into ammonia, which can then be converted into solid urea for fertilizer. http://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical/equilibria/haber.html
German chemists developed this and the method for making gasoline from coal during the wars when they were cut off from petroleum. At the time they weren't economical for nations with better access to raw materials but they have become so as the natural supply diminished.
-jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Haber
again from Wiki -
The 1910s and 1920s witness the rise of the Haber process and the Ostwald process. The Haber process produces ammonia (NH3) from methane (CH4) gas and molecular nitrogen (N2). The ammonia from the Haber process is then converted into nitric acid (HNO3) in the Ostwald process.[96] The development of synthetic fertilizer has significantly
half the people on the Earth are currently fed as a result of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use.[97]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urea
-jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.