garage door lubricant

snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:


OOPS, Guess I shouldn't be using it in the waste oil furnace in the shop or to fuel my foundry furnace...
But it does work really well for both...
--
Steve W.

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http://lmgtfy.com/?q=What+is+a+good+lubricant+for+garage+door+rollers
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boiled linseed oil works great, keeps everything from rusting.
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Yep... then top that off with LOTS of dry graphite, to keep everything moving smoothly. 'Bout a 1/2-oz per foot of roller channel works well.
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On 6/11/2015 12:00 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

What am I missing: garage door rollers are supposed to roll, the channel doesn't need to be lubricated.
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On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 15:54:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

And what do you do when it oxidizes and hardens? It's the basis of real, old-fashioned oil-based paint. First it turns to something like the gunk inside the lid of a molasses jar, and then it turns to varnish.
--
Ed Huntress

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REALLY? And then all that graphite would turn it into BLACK varnish?
Wow! What an amazing factoid!
<face-palm action>
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

ROTFLMAO
--
Snag



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On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 11:17:01 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Yup. Black paint, as any handyman over 60 ought to know.
Our oldest family home, built in 1741 in Greenland, NH, was painted with a mixture of linseed oil and white lead for well over 100 years. 'Makes good paint.
And several of my gunstocks are coated with hand-rubbed linseed, which dries in a month or so.
--
Ed Huntress

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Not if it's PROPERLY "boiled". You must've done them with commercial 'boiled linseed oil', which is not cooked, just prepared with chemical dryers to eventually sequester all the fats. In the long view, it's terrible stuff which stays sticky for a LONG time.
Proper old-school cooked, skimmed, strained linseed oil, on exposure to the oxygen in the air, polymerizes perfectly in about a week. In order to do that, ALL the fats have to be cooked out and mechanically removed.
And, if you pre-treat the wood with a potassium permanganate solution (and clean it again) to accelerate the normal slow oxidation process of the wood's own resins, you'll get a "years old" patina in about two months.
I've done a whole bunch of that, building period reproduction furniture.
L
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And blacksmiths traditionally (and still) rub workpieces straight from the fire (sooty, some scale) with linseed oil while just hot enough to gently smoke a bit. The heat accelerates the polymerization and the wiped-down piece is no longer sticky by the time it's cool enough to handle. Makes a nice, somewhat weather resistant black finish.
For wood, a point to note is that "boiled" linseed may contain cobalt dryer. Probably not very much but cobalt is toxic so you may want to avoid it on salad bowls and food prep surfaces.
Surely anyone suggesting linseed as a lubricant is doing it toungue in cheek? Surely? :-o
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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On 12 Jun 2015 02:06:39 -0300, Mike Spencer

Right. There are several metal "salts" that have been used in "boiled" linseed, generally not good things for your health. In the old days it was boiled with litharge -- red lead oxide. They're catalysts that promote polymerization of the oil.

One hopes. One never quite depends on it. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress

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Haven't you noticed how badly misinformed a few posters here are? And they are the most adamant that they are right and everyone else wrong.. A little knowledge...
I've salvaged a motor that had been oiled with salad oil, which is also unsaturated and polymerizes like linseed though not as solidly. Old machine tools sometimes have a coating of hardened oil, maybe lard oil?
-jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

I switched to using olive oil to coat my wok and cast iron pans just because the salad oil leaves a gummy mess .
--
Snag



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And I switched to boiled linseed oil and half-again its weight in graphite, just because I never wanted to paint the inside bearing surfaces of my garage door roller tracks again.
MAN, there are some stuffed-shirts on here!
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Totally different applications here Lloyd . I got tired of having to scrub the mess out of pans that don't see frequent use . Stuffed shirt ? Me ? Hardly ! I can think of a few places where your BLO and graphite mixture would work well though .
--
Snag



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'Still don't get it, do you, Terry?
When's the last time YOU painted the INSIDE BEARING SURFACE of a roller track?
Lloyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Never , and if you look above you'll see the post where I was laughing my ass off about it . HOWEVER there may actually be an application where graphite bound with BLO may make a decent lubricant . Ever heard of/used molykote 8800 ? MoS2 in a binder .
--
Snag



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Sorry. I didn't see it, or I'd have lightened up on you.
Apparently, though, SEVERAL folks here just do not get the joke.
And to the guy who asked why anyone would lubricate a ROLLING member... I don't know... why do they lubricate roller bearings? (duh!)
Lloyd
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On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 13:14:20 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

To reduce friction against the cages and against each other, in cageless sets.
--
Ed Huntress

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