Retaining compounds and related matters


A semi-rant.
I have been using a 262 threadlocker as a retaining compound not aware that
there are actually such things as retaining compounds better suited to the
job. While doing the research I realized that I am not the only one but that
is beside the point.
While visiting Vancouver recently I went to the KBC Tools branch where the
resident muppet denied any knowledge of such substance notwithstanding the
fact that it appeared on sale in their flyer three days later (after my
return, of course!)
I went hunting for retaining compounds all over the town yesterday and out
of town today. I believe I visited ten stores in all but in truth I lost
count. I gave up asking for the stuff after the first three stores'
associates looked at me with blank expressions (an auto part store, a tool
store and a a boat store).
The fact of the matter is none of the ones I wanted (635, 638 or 680 would
all have done the job) were available. One store had 620 - probably not
strong enough.
I am puzzled: Are retaining compounds such a rarity? I have an excuse of
being ignorant of them but from what I gather they should be quite common in
auto industry and anywhere else where shafts meet bearings etc.
Ah, well, it's JB Weld to the rescue...
I should add that at the same time I was trying to locate a 5/16"-18 brass
nut. I fared better there: In the very last shop I got the last one they had
on the shelf. I paid the full price of $0.18 + HST. I did not haggle. I took
the nut home and placed it carefully in a safe. Such rarity surely has to be
preserved for posterity.
Reply to
Michael Koblic
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Mail order or an industrial supply store. If you are cruising hardware stores, you are going to be disappointed. Heck, try finding a HSS tap in a hardware store, let alone a spiral point type.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
This is the thing: KBC Tools, KMS Tools, Fastenal and Ackland Grainger are all industrial supply stores. Admittedly the out-of-town branch of Fastenal offered to order it in (about the local branch the less said the better) but that will double the cost of a $15 bottle. As would mail order.
It is not a life-saving issue right now and JB Weld will do for the time being if the automotive fora are anything to go by. There are a few new entrants into the market such as Vibra-tite and Lloyds (the "Moovit" people) who may be cheaper and accommodating. Does Henkel now own both Loctite and Permatex?
Who knows I might be able to induce one of the local auto part stores to get some in.
And the silver lining of the whole episode was discovery of a shop in the neighboring town which has a huge selection of industrial adhesives, finishes, plastics etc. I have added it to my usual itinerary :-)
Reply to
Michael Koblic
The local car parts chains have a goodly part of the Permatex/Loctite line on the pegs around here, if they don't have it, it's usually less than a 24-hour delay for them to get it in, or it can be ordered off the web with free delivery at the local store. Usually the display is about 4' tall and 6-10' long. Some of the stuff that doesn't have an automotive use won't be found there, in which case MSC/Enco/Grainger is the next recourse. Most of the common bearing retainer/thread lockers are there, though. Even the local hardware chain stores carry three or four flavors of Loctite. Must be your particular area. If you're in an ag area, another place to look is farm stores like TSC and Farm+Fleet.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
No. Permatex is now owned by International Polymer Group (IPG) They sold off the Loctite name and product rights, and now battle Loctite for market share.
We sell Permatex. I doubt any of our 100 auto parts stores have anything more than threadlocker
In fact, the only Permatex product that is close to what you need is
#26240 Threadlocker RED & cup/core plug sealant retaining compound.
It's a slow seller
Reply to
RBnDFW
[...]
I believe this is identical to Loctite 262 which is what I use now (see OP). Interestingly, the Loctite 262 is the only threadlocker where they also quote shear strength after full cure: 1,450 psi. This is actually higher than the shear strength of JB Weld quoted in their literature although I suspect they are measured differently.
The 638 is the strongest at 3,625 psi.
I was wondering about the Loctite 660: It is a paste which is supposed to fill gaps up to 0.02" and their compressive shear strength (ISO10123, like all the others) is a respectable 2,490 psi. I think I saw the Permatex version in NAPA.
Reply to
Michael Koblic
I believe this is identical to Loctite 262 which is what I use now (see OP). Interestingly, the Loctite 262 is one of the threadlockers where they also quote shear strength after full cure: 1,450 psi. This is actually higher than the shear strength of JB Weld quoted in their literature although I suspect they are measured differently.
The 638 is the strongest at 3,625 psi.
I was wondering about the Loctite 660: It is a paste which is supposed to fill gaps up to 0.02" and their compressive shear strength (ISO10123, like all the others) is a respectable 2,490 psi. I think I saw the Permatex version in NAPA.
Reply to
Michael Koblic
I looked at every Permatex product in the catalog and only this one was a gap filler in addition to thread retention. They don't have nearly the range that Loctite does. At one time they had the whole Loctite range, of course.
Reply to
RBnDFW
Now I am really puzzled!
You have responded to my post which I am not seeing myself (I did not think it got through - twice!) Anyway, see the Part 2: The 20297 is supposed to be identical to Loctite 660.
Reply to
Michael Koblic

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