rotary phase converters

Hi
I am thinking of getting a rotary phase converter from Temco to drive
my Cincinnati mill. In particular I am considering the 6500-11KW or
6500-15KW units.
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anyone used these and would care to comment on them. I believe
that if I went with these I would have enough to also run a 3ph lathe
if I found one I liked. Thanks
Reply to
spamkill at charter dot net
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I do not like them due to their very aggressive self marketing on wikipedia. Otherwise their converter will work. Consider installing a VFD instead of a phase converter. You may gain some functionality by going the VFD route (variable speed, electric braking, slow acceleration, and reversal), save money, electric bills, and reduce noise.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16379
What is the full-load power rating of your Cincinnati mill.? This information will be on the motor's name plate.
Bob Swinney
Hi I am thinking of getting a rotary phase converter from Temco to drive my Cincinnati mill. In particular I am considering the 6500-11KW or 6500-15KW units.
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anyone used these and would care to comment on them. I believe that if I went with these I would have enough to also run a 3ph lathe if I found one I liked. Thanks
Reply to
Robert Swinney
If you're going to *buy* an RPC, do as Iggy says and get a VFD instead. MUCH better for the same money or cheaper!!
Few people here buy RPC's. An RPC is just a 3 phase motor with some capacitors and a relay or 2. Minimum is just the motor, a cap, and a push button switch. That's what mine is. Works fine. No, wait the minimum is just the motor and a pull-strap to get it going 8-) There is an endless list of build-yer-own-RPC posts in the archives.
And as Bob said, find your motor size, so you don't over buy or build. The referenced RPC's are likely 10 times what you need (15 & 20 hp).
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
Why not consider a single phase 220 motor? Mills don't have a high starting torque requirement, and mills have more than adequate gearboxes for speed selection. My 1929 Kempsmith has something like a dozen spindle speed selections with a flip of the levers.
Besides, horizontal mills were designed for constant input shaft speed. If you change speeds with a VFD you will affect the feed rate at the same time as the feed gearbox is run from a PTO off the input shaft. (at least on the older machines).
Tony
Reply to
Tony
--FWIW I'm a fan of Phase-a-Matic stuff. I've had a solid state one on my Bridgeport for 30 years with no problems and I've had a rotary for maybe 20 years; intermittent use but again no problems. Another thing I like about them: they sell the solid state ones as kits. Website:
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Reply to
steamer
is it possible you are confusing Solid State with "no moving parts"? every phase-o-matic thing I've looked at had capacitors and relays but no solid state components - or did I miss something?
Reply to
William Noble
If you are going to spend money for new get the VFD. I'm using a rpc since I got a 5hp one for free.
Wes
Reply to
Wes

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