rotation?

Right hand vs. Left hand rotation. Clockwise vs. Counter-clockwise.
When dealing with pump, motor etc. rotation, Is R.H clockwise?
Reply to
chuck
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Entirely depends if you are looking 'end on' at the shaft, or over the motor !
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Isn't there an industry standard to the terms? Does the "right hand rule" pertain?
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Reply to
chuck
Look for an arrow. Sometimes not plainly evident, at all.
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
I think you look at the shaft, 180 degrees from your eyes to find left or right rotation.
Reply to
jano
Yes.
Reply to
Steve Austin
So looking at the shaft of lets say a spinning motor, the shaft will be pointing away from your eyes, (180 degrees). If the shaft is spinning clockwise, that makes it right hand rotation? That derives from using your right hand, pointing the thumb out-(shaft 180 degrees from eyes). The fingers curl clockwise (rotation) around thumb (shaft). Do I have this right or am I all screwed up?
Reply to
chuck
I quote the Grainger Catalog:
"Unless stated otherwise, rotation stated in this catalog is viewed facing the shaft end of the motor (VFSE); for double-shafted motor, view is from the lead end (VFLE)."
"Lead" means the electrical leads, not some esoteric description of the "other" shaft.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Oh... yeah... They don't state "right hand" or "left hand" rotations. They're all specified as Clock-wise or Counter Clock-wise rotations.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Yes, when looking at the end of the shaft.
Reply to
Don Foreman
I know I have a way of over-complicating things, but I'm still confused!
Reply to
chuck
I think I might be also. You can think of a motor as if it were part of a clock, with a clock hand on the shaft. (You hardly ever read a clock from behind the motor, right?) Looking at the motor and hand, if the hand rotates clockwise, that is right-hand rotation.
But if the convention for a driven load, like a pump is the same, then a left-hand-rotating motor would be needed to drive a right-hand rotating load(pump) if they face each other as when direct-coupled. No problem if the drive system is pulleys and a belt because then they rotate the same direction.
I think the convention is the same for motors and loads, but I'm not 100% sure of that.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Sometimes motors will say CWLE or CCWLE which means looking at the motor from the end the wires(or leads) connect it is CW or CCW. LE stands for lead end. If the motor info is stamped on the end of the motor then it is CW or CCW from that end. If all this fails you put power on it and see what it does. Good Luck Lyndell
Reply to
Lyndell Thompson

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