Rust protecting 12L14

My second attempt to make that dog clutch, is to make it from a proper
diameter 12L14 round bar.
It seems to work a little better, this being a round bar already means
less machining, I fixed some bugs, redid the feedrate math, etc and so
far it seems to be working. There is 50 minutes machining time left.
The purpose of this is to make an adaptor to connect my servo motor
with a work gear box, to the knee.
Anyway, this 12L14 is the most amazing rusting machine imaginable, the
chips made 2 hours ago are already rusting despite the coolant.
So.
How do I make the finished product -- a 6 inch long 12L14 bar --
somewhat rust protected?
Right now, I think that I need to simply dry it, and cover with
"marine grease" inside or where any surfaces mate, and something oily,
but cleaner, outside.
Any other ideas?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus562
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Sounds like the coolant is too dilute.
Zinc plating, using a kit from Caswell.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
Dry with compressed air and then spray it with automatic transmission fluid...finally, place into a clean plastic bag.
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
I've had reasonably good results from blackening 12L14 by boiling it in sodium thiosulphate (phototographers' "hypo") and rubbing on a little LPS3. It's protected a knurled adjusting screw on my sawmill that I turn with sweaty hands.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
In article , Jim Wilk> > > ...>
Now there's an idea.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
I made the backing plate for a lathe chuck out of 12L14 about 10 years ago and just did it with cheap cold bluing and a wipe of oil. It's rust free today. It really takes bluing well and looks great.
Reply to
DT
Toss some zinc on that puppy, eh? Hmm, except for the working groove. That will take a lot of wear and I don't think zinc will bear up.
Maybe go have it chromed in an existing chroming lot if anyone in your area still does that.
Or call Caswell Plating and ask which of their kits would be best for it.
-- The more passions and desires one has, the more ways one has of being happy. -- Charlotte-Catherine
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I was going to suggest bluing it, but I've only ever blued mild steel parts inadvertently, as a side-effect of some metalworking process that involves a torch. It does seem to help, though.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I use cold blue from Birchwood-Casey or Outers, then wipe on a thin coat of Vaseline. It works for me. I'll have to try the hot hypo.
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Ignoramus562 wrote in rec.crafts.metalworking on Mon, 21 Feb 2011 22:33:48 -0600:
Clean, coat with linseed oil, bake at 450F for 20min-40min.
Reply to
dan
clean it bake it rub off the micro rust and grease it ?
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
Flash copper plate it. No current - super saturated solution and placing a bar in it cools it - depositing copper. Test it first.
Once copper plated - wash and grease or oil.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
Oops missed that one first time around.
Cheapest finish I know of is heat it to 400 or so then drop into a bucket of used motor oil or similar.
More properly, one would use beeswax turpentine and linseed and call it a "blacksmith finish"
YMMV
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT

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