Ryobi BGH827 bench grinder vibration saga continues



    [ ... ]

    That is what I would believe to be the case.

    Well ... that depends on which DuMore. The illustration showing "ringing" a wheel looks like one around 10" to 12" diameter. And while I was looking for the right manual to download, I saw some really large ones which were designed to be mounted on something like a planer to convert it into a surface grinder. :-)

    That sounds good.

    O.K. That is where you want the fit to be good.

    O.K. Lots of choices. :-)

    Hmm ... I thought that the center hole was formed before they were fired. But I've never been around the manufacture of the wheels.

    Good. I thought so -- but this was for others reading the thread as well. I had never even considered applying pressure at differing diameters on the two sides before reading that manual, but it certainly makes sense as something to be avoided.

    O.K. They also say (for the toolpost grinder, at least) that the minimum diameter of the flanges should be one-third of the diameter of a *new* wheel.

    Good -- again mentioned for others.

    Yep. Though it can be smooth enough to stick anyway. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I don't plan to own a large enough lathe for that DuMore.

I don't think the firing process is all that precise. After all, the wheel material is a form of weak, porous pottery.

Yes. Stone is strong in compression, but weak in tension. Only same diameter yields pure compression in the stone.

Well, no bench grinder complies with this rule, not even Baldor.
But if there are desirable stones available that are 1" wide and 8" diameter, with a 3" diameter central hole, I'd be happy to make a flanged sleeve arbor for it.

I think I will oil the blotter paper next time. Vactra #2 of course.
Joe Gwinn
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In article

[snip]
Aha! I did not know the history, but I did know that Delta/Rockwell's days of glory were long past. One knows this instantly when looking at any current Delta product.
That said, I do have a small Delta variable-speed drill press that does work, and is made of iron and steel. But I did have to replace the chuck with a real Jacobs chuck.
When did these changes happen?

And probably many parts from the peoples' noodle factory. At least approximately.
What I do not understand is why the noodle factory does not do a better job of copying the real grinders. Making the arbor shoulders wide enough to ensure that the dished washers are definitely located cannot be that expensive. One can use stamped washers and perhaps spherical washers, so nothing need be that precise.
One assumes that the problem is simple ignorance.
Joe Gwinn
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I missed the first chapter. Are the stones the ones that came with the grinder?
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One yes, one no. I bought a Norton white aluminum oxide wheel for HSS, and it has the 1" center hole.
Joe Gwinn
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I've read that the cheap stones provided are not necessairly of uniform density and may never balance, even when dressed. Not sure if that's universally true or not, but you may want to test with two name brand stones once you get your flanges sorted.
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I've read this too. The simple test is to run with only one stone.
Actually, I have two Norton wheels, now that I thionk of it.
Joe Gwinn
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