Sandbags in the bed of a pickup truck

On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 04:38:14 GMT, Fitch R. Williams


Definitely DO make them for light trucks. W695s and DMZ2s. The WS50 is the standard passenger car tire.LM22s are the performance profile tires.

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clare @ snyder.on .ca wrote:

Cool. What size and weight rating are those? I will need 6 of them in load range D for my 3500 Dodge after I move to PA if I can get them the right size. Chains don't seem like a good idea on a dually. Blizzacks might be just the right tire.
Thanks Fitch
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On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 15:52:12 GMT, Fitch R. Williams

Up to 12 pli IIRC. Do a google search on Blizzak W695
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clare @ snyder.on .ca wrote:

Thanks. The search that worked was Blizzak W965. They have the size for my 3500 dually - LT215/85R16 in load range E. A bit pricey but they have them. They have them in the size for Tiph's truck too.
Thanks Fitch
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says...

Just remember (not sure if this was covered) that the compound on blizzaks happens to be very, very soft. So much so that they actually make them dual-compounded IIRC, the first part is very soft and 'works' in snow, but if driven for any length of time on clean pavement, will wear rapidly. There is a harder compound rubber underneath.
Never buy blizzaks 'used only one season...'
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
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wrote:

The new ones are a LOT better than the early ones. 55% of the tread is the sticky stuff, and if you don't get them too warm they stand up pretty well. Don't drive over 60mph on dry pavement, and don't accellerate hard enough to spin, and you're good. Even the hard part works pretty good on snow, but the soft outer layer is GREAT on ice.

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Why?
JTMcC.
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 02:54:35 GMT, "JTMcC"

Well, for one thing, the fenders are fiberglass. Second, getting the chains on and off on a dual wheel setup is a genuine PITA. The Blizzaks are rated as "extreme traction" tires, so even in the passes where chains are required, if under 10,000 lbs you are legal without chains. I'd do almost anything NOT to have to put the chains on, drive with the chunk-chunk of the chains through the bad stuff, and then take them off again when I hit good pavement. Chains don't stand up worth a hoot on pavement at speed. I've driven with chains on the PowerWagon, and on the Dart. Drove with studs on the Valiant, and clampons on the Renault and Colt rallye cars. The clampons were easy to put on and off, and were a definite help in heavy snow - but useless on ice. Didn't like chains on ice either. Studs and ice tires are about tie for first on ice and hardpack - and the ice tires are SO much quieter on pavement - and safer.

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I drive about 50,000 miles per year in a 1 ton and I'm on my third one now and I think it's a heck of a lot easier to chain one up than it is on any car, and as easy as any pickup. Chains are a bit of a pain to install on anything. But when you really need them nothing else will do. Of course most folks are just staying home at that point, but my work means we have to go, unless the front bumper is plowing snow, and that means chains on occasion. As for weight in the bed, we use about 5000 lbs. of welding machine/tools, well secured of course<g>, and it works pretty good. On the occasions I have to drive a lightly or unloaded 1 ton it always amazes me just how little traction is available compared to a fully loaded truck. Our trucks are usually around 10,500 - 11,000.
JTMcC, still happily carrying chains in the trucks.

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The real problems with chains seem to me to center around a couple of areas. I've run chains on my small Toy pickup for a couple of years, and I've made the following observations:
1) They work great when the snow or ice is really thick.
2) They're a pain to put on.
3) Speed should be restricted to below about 30 mph when using
4) Even then the chains will throw a link now and then and require a stop to repair or remove the broken cross link that is battering around.
5) Most times around here, the snow on the roads is so uneven that chains are not a good choice. Some towns plow right down to the pavement and then the chains get roughed up a lot, and because traffic speeds increase again, the speed limit imposed by chains makes driving with them dangerous - obstructing traffic and all.
6) Crawing around in the snow and ice to remove/install/repair chains is uncomfortable and if done by the side of the road in a storm, downright hazardous.
7) Studded snow tires seem to suffer from none of the above problems.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
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snip

snip
I found the perfect use for all those tire chains I happened to drag along with me when I moved south,.
I cut ther links on the cross chains off the long chain that goes around the tire, and fasten them to fence posts with a couple of fence wire staples and use them for gate latches. Makes a perfect "goat proof" latch. I sure don't miss chains, studs, snow tires and bags of sand asnd deicer one little bit. All we have to do is wait an hour or two and any snow or ice that may have fallen or accumulates is usually history. Its rare indeed to be hindered by winter conditions in this area. But just move 200 miles east to Atlanta and its a different ball game, same for 100 miles north to Birmingham area, it gets cold and often sees frozen ice covered and snow covered roadways.
One thing I always enjoyed doing when I lived in Pennsylvania, and that was to be out driving in a snow storm on a country road in 6 or more inches of new snow. It was always so quiet, and peacefull, just the occasional squeak of snow under the tires and most outside noises just muffled.
Around here the big thing is "mud" tires ;-) Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wifes, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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cable chains are a very good product and mitigate if not solve most of the problems w/link chains. they cost 2-3x, but last 3x longer. they are hard to find, some places, because of the cost overhead in stocking a decent selection of sizes. they used to be called, "radial tire" chains, & can be ordered from a full line parts house.
--Loren

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On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 14:51:05 -0800, "lane"

Junior got a good deal on Blizzaks for his baby. After the first snow, he had a new credo -"keep a close watch on the rear view mirror cause that guy behind you won't stop as quick as you can!" Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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wrote:

and remember, you buy FOUR for one vehicle. You NEVER put on only 2, particularly on Front Drive vehicles. The handling is so radically different from any other (even regular snow) tire that the MUST be installed in sets. These new-breed "High Traction" snow tires are almost as effective as the old studded tires - without the dangers associated with carbide studs. Youngest daughter had Blizzaks on her '94 Colt last year - and could go regardless of how bad the weather / roads were. Her friends would often leave their larger, heavier, in most people's eyes "more capable" cars sit in bad weather and go with her. I never worried if she was going to get stuck - only if she would make it home without being hit. (Small cars have advantages in that repect too ---- but that's another story.) It actually had better traction in snow than the old summer tires had on damp or hot pavement. There was no question when she got the Neon - it was getting a good set of high traction dedicated snow tires for the winter.
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On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 14:51:05 -0800, "lane"

They go on about Nov 15 and come off about the end of March. They do not wear well on warm pavement.
Blizzaks and Graspics seem to be about equal in performance. The Winter Kings are not far behind, - Michelin Alpins are good on hardpack and ice, but lousy in the deep sloppy stuff. Hakapelitas are excellent too if you can get them. Back in my rally driving days Metzellers and Haks were king for winter rallying - the Metzeller Blue tread was hygroscopic and really gripped the ice well.

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On Thu, 11 Dec 2003 13:26:37 -0600, David A. Webb

Local fishing tool (oil field stuff) guy didnt bother to fasten his load of bailers down in the rack in the back of his pickup. The angular cut (think hypo needle tip) 3" x 8' long bailer simply continued forwards, through the tool box, the cab, the gas tank, the back of the seat, the driver, the steering wheel, the dash board and into the engine compartment when he slammed on the brakes and rather gently hit the back of the tanker truck ahead of him..
I know the driver personally, and Jim said he talked to the guy for about 20 minutes, waiting for the ambulence to arrive, got his last will and testiment, how to settle his estate and bills, etc etc, to tell his wife he loved her..then died about the time they could hear the sirens.
I had a rifle knock me out, when it came loose from the pickup rear window gun rack , when the front end of the pickup I was riding in dropped into a ditch hidden in the sage brush.
On a slightly bigger note..saw the truck after a blow out preventer broke free from its tie downs when it hit another truck in the fog. Neither the driver nor passengers survived.....
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
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Well there it is. Sometimes guns almost *do* kill people.
Most folks don't have a feel for the forces involved in even a minor car crash. A broken sternum from a seat belt is a small price to pay.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
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"David A. Webb" wrote:

But I bet she died with a smile on her face....
Jeff
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"If you can keep smiling when things go wrong, you've thought of someone to place the blame on."
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Hi,     I know a guy who use to run a garage/ towing service. One winter's night he got a call from the local cops to come to an accident. As he pulled up to the scene, he recognized his son's best friend's pickup truck. The kid had hit a pole and one of the loose cement block in the bed for traction had taken the off the top of the kid's head.     First thing this guy did when he got home even though it was 3 or 4 in the motning was take all of the blocks out of the back of all 3 of his trucks. (A week later he was able to start eating again.)
    I would vote to secure the whatever weight you have in the back. For one thing, the back of the truck often comes up when they hit something so it is glass, not steel that is stopping the sand bags.          The added weight does help because pickups have a front heavy weight distribution. Adding weights in the bed ( over the rear axle) increases the overall vehicle wight by a small percentage but increase the weight on the rear by a much larger percentage.
Thanks Roger Haar
*************************************************8888 "David A. Webb" wrote:

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On Thu, 11 Dec 2003 12:06:14 -0600, David A. Webb

I rebuilt a '47 Chevy PU in northern Wis. and put a flat bed on it. As soon as it snowed the truck wouldn't even move down the road without weight on the back. I could be wrong , but I would think the best option would be to put the front wheels on a scale and add weight back by the bumper until the front and back weight the same. Maybe just a bit more up front. Then get something like a railroad track of the same weight and make up two things like cranking up the spare under the truck just infront of the back bumper. And leave it there winter and summer , then you can drop it at home when you are going to pick something up that is heavy. Bolt it also if your worried about a chain letting go. Or cut holes in the rail and double chain it to the frame. That's what I would have done , but I left in Jan. with a full load going south.
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