Shower head repair

I have a shower with a head the size of a dessert plate. It is nice, however, it is made of two pieces (top and bottom) that were pressed
into one another. It started spreading apart under water pressure and leak, and for now, I am using a clamp to hold them together, which is ugly and temporary.
The metal of the head is non-magnetic and heavy, suggesting stainless. The appearance is that of chrome.
I would like to know if I could just tig them together. (like make 12 or so point welds around the perimeter) Any experiences with this? Any idea what is the stainless steel used on showers?
i
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I'd soak it in in CLR, or vinegar to remove the calcium deposits. Something is reducing flow, increasing pressure inside the unit.
A bit of wire brushing, sand papering and solder as suggested first would be a start. If stainless then silver braze.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
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Definitely a good idea.

OK, I will see tonight if it is brass, potmetal or stainless.
i
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The other possibility is to drill several holes through the area where the two ends meet, tap and just put in stainless or brass machine screws (depending on the material). I think that four 10-32 screws should work.
i
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Ignoramus16148 wrote:

Its probably plated brass (have a look) - solder it together, 100w iron should do it...
Andrew VK3BFA.
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Someone said "brass", but it's just as likely zinc pot metal. If it is, you'll play hell welding or soldering it. If it's brass, you're in luck.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Clean well and JB-Weld the entire seam. Should work regardless of the material, with no heating to potentially warp or otherwise damage the parts.
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luck.
For a little extra strength score the surface to be mated before JB Welding.
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and
is
is,
Welding.
P.S. I used JB Weld to patch a damaged hydraulic clutch cylinder once. It held for 3-4 years until I junked the car. JB Weld is incredibley strong if all surfaces are properly cleaned and prepared. Where the hose fitting screwed into the cylinder was stripped. I lined the hole and side of the fitting with JB Weld and screwed it in, then smeared a little over the outside just for good measure. No problems with it there after.
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I tried to fix an a/c condenser where the crimps that held the coils in the frame cut into the alumimum tubing. Staticly with 120 psi air on it, it held 24hrs, as soon as I charged with freon and ran the system for 5 minutes the bond failed. It is good stuff but it has its limits.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
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I fixed it yesterday. The problem was that the method of attaching top to the bottom was very substandard and the attachment broke in one point out of four. I drilled and tapped 10-32 holes from four sides and it will hold up forever. The material is brass.
i
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Victory dance!
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 08:58:56 -0600, Ignoramus13009

=======Thanks for the feedback. I always like to hear "the rest of the story." Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
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Thanks.
I think that I want to replace the current brass screws, with stainless screws, for appearance reasons. I am concerned whether stainless would somehow react with the brass in a detrimental way, over the years. Any idea?
i

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I've heard for condensors, the stuff to use is the red epoxy high temp stuff. I've never tried it.
Mending aluminum is a PIA. I've mended a lot of copper, though.
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On Mar 24, 8:41�am, Ignoramus16148 <ignoramus16...@NOSPAM. 16148.invalid> wrote:

Consider using a Marmon clamp to repair the head. Quick. Good. Not cheap.
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On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 07:41:16 -0500, Ignoramus16148

Thin metal, as stamped sheetmetal, might be stainless. Heavy metal is very likely chrome-plated potmetal. (Zinc alloy). If it's quite old it could be a chrome-plated brass casting, but I'd be quite surprised.
I'd be flat amazed if it were a stainless forging or investment casting.
Some silicone glue/sealer and three small stainless screws are probably the best fix. The silicone alone would very probably hold it.
As others mentioned, an acid soak in vinegar or CRS will remove calcium deposits -- but be aware that zinc is very susceptable to even weak acids.
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On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 11:24:14 -0600, Don Foreman

There's some new stuff that's brass. I found out in my house in Texas before I moved to Michigan when one of my young sons decided it'd be a nifty experiment to SHAVE the black powder coated fixture in the boys' bathroom. A razor, diligently applied, will remove epoxy powder coating from brass. I don't remember the brand, Kohler or Moen, but it was pretty damned expensive to replace.
Pete Keillor

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On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 07:41:16 -0500, Ignoramus16148

Could it be aluminium die castings? SWMBO bought a meat tenderizer made by Kitchenaide for me the other day - the mallet thingy with one flat face, one spikey face (would definitely tenderize "meat"). Out of curiosity and in an effort to determine the material, I came up with a rough Specific Gravity of 3.8 which, to me, indicates chromium plated aluminium casting. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 21:33:48 -0400, Gerald Miller

You have way too much time on your hands..:-)
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