Simple Machines: three or six?

OK, the Kid Down The Street came to me with a project. He has to make
something with all SIX(!) simple machines.
So, I said to him, "There are only THREE simple machines. The lever,
the wheel and the inclined plane."
"No," he said, "there are SIX simple machines. The lever, the wheel
and axle, the wedge, the pulley, the screw and the inclined plane."
"Bullshit!" says I, "A pulley is just a wheel (and maybe, when you add
in a rope, it's got a little lever mixed in), a wedge is just an
inclined plane and a screw is just an inclined plane wrapped around a
wheel."
"Look it up." says the Smart Ass Down The Street.
So, I googled "Simple Machines" and, lo and behold, it appears that
they are teaching kids about these SIX things - the original three
plus the three inbred cousins.
What the fuck?
Reply to
RangersSuck
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"RangersSuck" wrote in message
has to make
The lever,
the wheel
inclined plane."
when you add
just an
wrapped around a
appears that
original three
Scary ain't it! We're in trouble with that educational train of thought, or lack of. Perhaps the student who sticks to the basic three machines and can explain why will get extra credit? I'm curious as to how these 'teachers' attempt to explain 'centrifugal force' , or how to 'push a rope' or pick up a turd by the clean end. phil
Reply to
Phil Kangas
Don't feel bad. I had to learn all 7 vowels.... now they claim only 5....
Reply to
Gene
What happened to the "sometimes Y and W" From the late 30s till 1949 it was: A E I O U and sometimes Y and W. :-) ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick
I guess there are 2 (two) possible problems here. 1 The abominable education of our teachers and the other, 2 The posibility of the products of above procedures puting such "information" on the internet. Especially the infamous "Wickipedia", or however you spell it. ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick
Never heard of "sometimes W" Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Jesus, Lew, you're quick to dismiss teachers' educations.
"Y" can be a vowel (myth, glyph) and "w" can be a vowel (cow, in which ow is a diphthong, but the w results in the same sound as a u). The cases of "y" being a vowel are mostly spelling artifacts, in which a modern spelling would result in the use of "i." The "w's" used as vowels are mostly diphthongs.
Those facts are connected to the reason that they seldom do the "sometimes y and sometimes w" thing these days. Both letters are overwhelmingly used as consonants, and when they are used as vowels, it's in an odd usage that usually represents an ancient spelling. One way to look at that is that they are vowels only when they are used incorrectly according to today's rules of spelling. d8-)
The English teachers today know what they're doing. *Our* English teachers just weren't very clear thinkers. Most of them probably couldn't have given the explanation above.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
You probably had a better grade-school education than we did.
What they should have told us is that Y and W are consonants, but, because of some spelling artifacts in standard English, they occasionally stand in for certain vowels. They have no unique vowel sounds of their own. They just fill in for others in some antique spellings.
That is, unless you're Welsh, in which case almost anything can be a vowel, and the more of them you string together, the better. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Such as "PYX"? Mike in BC
Reply to
Michael Gray
I married one 51 years ago while she was still an undergrad. :-) ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick
The only reference I see to "pyx" is a Latin transliteration from Greek, first used in English in the 13th century. If that's what you're referring to, then yes, that's an ancient spelling artifact. If it were coined today, it would be "pix."
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
You've got me beat. I've only had mine for 34 years and she's hardly broken in. d8-)
However, she was a high-flying retail buyer in those days, who traveled to Europe on fashion-buying trips. Now, at least I can count on her being home.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
The Pyx (1973) More at IMDb Pro Her business is pleasure. Until her date with ... The Pyx.
Gosh, Karen Black is 69..
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
That's not something I'm going to chase down, but it sounds like a coinage with an intentional antiquarian twist, or an allusional or double meaning, like "Myst."
The original "pyx" was some kind of wooden box with religious significance.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
You can look for currently 28 (!) basic mechanisms. The 28th being the Newbould Indexer.
Here is a some interesting reading on the 28th basic mechanism, and how it came to be..
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Reply to
Half-Nutz
It is the small case that priests use to carry the consecrated communion wafer in. They carry them around when they are visiting the sick.
Eight years of penguins and Jesuits leaves one with a lot of arcane knowledge.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
So a pyx is a holy breadbox. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
A rose by a different name?
Do any of you machinists out there remember a number of years ago (10? 20?) someone declared, and others agreed, there was a new "Simple Machine" discovered?
IIRC it was a pair of roller bearings which were kept in contact by an "S" shapped spring, and this measured "zero" rolling resistance when used between two planes.
What ever happened to this idea? I never saw it developed.
dennis in nca
Reply to
rigger
I don't call myself a machinist, but I remember that thing... it could be used for a thermostat among other things. I'd guess more than 20 years ago.
Ah, thanks to Google.. the "Rolamite", ca. 1968 (40 years!):
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Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Or just about any word ending in a consonant followed by 'y', like 'fairy' or 'fairly'.
Not necessarily wooden (in fact, I've never seen a wooden one), used to carry a consecrated host (on sick calls, for instance).
I'm trying to think of an example of 'w' as a vowel...
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer

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