Smaller torch tip

I have a Victor 315FC heavy duty torch.
I have some crap, like Equipto benches and various remnants of
specialized bearing assembly machines, made of thin metal. I want to
cut that stuff up to use less space.
Would it be true to say that, for cutting a lot of thin metal, it is
best to use a small tip, as it would save gas?
Say, for cutting up to 1/2" metal I would be best to switch to a
Number 1 tip.
Right?
Thanks
i
Reply to
Ignoramus32003
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Ignoramus32003 fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Yep, Small tip, small kerf. Depth corresponds to width.
I have a small Victor hobby torch I bought decades ago for use on angle- irons, and the like under 3/8" thick. Lots less messy and more conservative of gas than the big torch, but not a lot slower, so long as the material isn't too thick.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
On cutting stuff like 3 x 3 x .120 tubing, it is good to almost lay the torch down so that the flame attacks the metal at about a ten to fifteen degree angle. You can cut about two inches with the O2 jet, and it will be VERY smooth. If you want the raggedy look, you can bring it up to ninety, stopping somewhere in between. But if you want real thin stuff cut clean, lay the tip almost parallel with the surface. Now, we're talking about thin stuff. Under 1/2". Yes, a 1 tip would be good. Use 4# acet to cut up to one inch thick, and vary the O2 for the thickness of the metal, as well as changing tips if you get into 1/4" or 3/16" stuff. Just depends on how you want it to look, and how much grinding you want to do.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Which size tip do you use for welding?
I bought a used Victor tote with a J28 torch and #2 tip, which makes more flame than I want to weld thermocouple wires. I have a #000 tip on order because it's the only size that doesn't exceed the withdrawal rate rule for an MC tank, if that really matters. (?)
My other intended use for it is filling in gaps and pits from MIG welding car sheet metal.
-jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Plasma....
Reply to
Steve W.
This time, I just want to cut up some fluffy scrap to take less space. I do no care about the looks.
We have a propane track torch for cutting plate. It works extremely well, the cut is super clean and super straight.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus2734
Try it with the torch pointed almost parallel with the surface, just a bit downward. The O2 will blow longer cuts than having it at a right angle.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
I will, tomorrow
Reply to
Ignoramus2734
If you just want to scrap it out, use a larger tip and put the torch at a very low angle to the metal. You will be amazed how fast it will cut that way, but it doesn't work well for accurate cutting.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Ernie: When I was in the carport business, I used a lot of 3 x 3 x .120" square tube. I would mark the cuts in soapstone, then lay the torch over, cutting on the waste side of the line. I was able to bring in the O2 cutting jet to come very close to the soapstone line, and very straight. I did have the O2 set a little higher, like 30 psi, so that it would cut farther. But it is more than a little surprising how good a cut one can get when you lay the torch over, heat it up, and use the O2 jet to cut with. Yes, it won't do everything perfect and straight, but it does have some very good uses.
I have seen some very nice metal sculpture on the Vegas streets, and am going to get out some of my paint lock, and see how it behaves, and how the slag does at different angles. I do have sheet metal cutters, but would like to cut some off with a torch to keep the boogers on there for decorative purposes.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB

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