Spur gear YouTube


I stumbled across this and found it fascinating because
it provided information that I "didn't know I didn't know":
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--Winston
Reply to
Winston
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I watched this a couple years ago. Been more than once I tried to justify making a gear but was always able to find a stock gear I could rework to fix a broken machine.
I'm going to make a couple gears some time real soon just to be able to say I did it.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
I haven't made a gear like that in years. The comment about "no distractions" was right on. The first and second tries at making the gear wound up in the scrap barrel. 3rd try looked more like a military aircraft checklist!
W> I stumbled across this and found it fascinating because
Reply to
RoyJ
I want to do that, for the same reason.
Let's see; I could connect my NC rotary table as a fourth axis... This could be easier than using a dividing head. :)
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
The labor time required - amazing.
Reply to
cavelamb
Grainger catalog:
Item # 1L994 Spur Gear, 6 Pitch, Pitch Dia 5.000 In, Face Width 1.500 In, Number of Teeth 30, Bore Dia 1.125 In, Outside Dia 5.333 In, Overall Length 2.380 In
One Hundred Thirty $mackers.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Nothing new there for me, but I used to routinely cut clock wheels, and pinions.
Steve R.
Reply to
Steve R.
It takes less time than you may think. I timed myself making a 144 tooth great wheel for a clock once. Fifteen minutes to cut the teeth with a home made cycloidal cutter. Two hours to cross it out (make spokes), debur and polish. The dividing head was home made.
Steve R.
Reply to
Steve R.
On Wed, 09 Dec 2009 16:03:17 -0800, the infamous Winston scrawled the following:
So, what tidbit did you learn from that video, Winnie?
Man, who was the _dynamic_ narrator?
-- To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive. -- Robert Louis Stevenson
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I wouldn't feel any shame doing it that way if I could. :)
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Sector arms. I'd seen them on dividing heads before but never knew their purpose. Kewl.
And mostly just seeing the tools assembled and in use to create the gear. One picture being worth a thousand words and all that. Edifying while entertaining.
Hey I understood everything he said!
I took a computer architecture course at DEC many years ago. Our instructor had an almost opaque accent and would sneeze occasionally. It took me a couple hours to figure out that he wasn't sneezing, he was attempting to say 'Master Sync, Slave Sync'!
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
I think that it is a beautiful video. I also loved the music. Sounds lie it is from old silent movies, Would anyone know what is the music.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus20864
For gears and many other interesting ideas, see if you can find the locations of John Stevenson's shop methods.
A few (or more) years ago, he built a gear cutting machine using synchronized steppers and a worm gear box instead of a dividing head.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
I can't name it but it falls into the category of music called 'Honky Tonk' or 'Boogie Woogie'. Prolly a rag of some sort.
Very nice!
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Bumble bee boogie,
see
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technomaNge
Reply to
technomaNge
YES! Thanks. --Winston
Reply to
Winston
I think I prefer Winifred Atwell's rendition :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
(...)
I couldn't listen to the YouTube version because it was very poorly recorded. Atwell appears to be a genius, though. Made it look trivial.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston

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