Two videos of one of my IC-engines I built

Hi!
About 4 years ago, I have built this stationary 4 stroke with 87 ccm. It was
my second IC-engine I've built.
With "todays modern technology" like video and YouTube (Nick, wake up!) I
was able ...
Well, here are the videos. The second one shows it running.


Enjoy!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
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Nice looking engine! Is it from a casting kit? If so, what kit.
Boy! it sure took off when you goosed it with the screwdriver!
Should run a lot cooler after a few more hours. I see a lot of steam from the water hopper.
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
Nick,
I always think of hit-and-miss engines as a rural US product. To what extent did they exist in Germany and are there collectors for them? Here, almost any county fair will have a few restored original engines running, some with water pumps or buck saws.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
No, just hammer, OA-torch, jigsaw and a MAG welder. :-) It only looks like being casted. Except the flywheel.
It isn't running that hot. You could dip your finger into the water. It's a bit could outside, so it looks like a lot of steam. Never got the water boiling.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I am not aware of engines like that being used pre WWII. But then, I'm not an expert in that field. Farms were small and if they were big enough and had the money to buy an engine, it was something like the Lanz-Bulldog. After WWII, some small 2-strokes or Diesels were built, but AFAIK, almost everything was driven from the tractor's utility shaft (right word?).
Yes, I'm aware of that. Here, we do have tractor-meetings, the English do have steam-roller meetings. ;-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Sweet! Sounds just like being at the local old engine show. I like a hit and miss.
Uncle is bugging me to help him post pictures of his full sized (antique) hit and miss on smokstak.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Well, in the north, they had some monsters like these:
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
That's an interesting machine. Looks like it is being used to do something on a canal or dike by a river. Is that a winch on the bottom?
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
Ploughing winch.
Reply to
Wayne Weedon
Yes. It was used for dredging a plow (weight 30 tons) across the field. The manufacturer is "Ottomeyer" and the machine is called "Dampffplug" if you want to google for it.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I presume that was used like the British plowing engines with one either side of the field pulling the plow through the field on a cable, the weight of the engines themselves preventing them plowing directly by crossing the field.
Reply to
David Billington
They were real big in US boats - oh - centry before last?
That's a great looking engine.
Reply to
cavelamb himself
The drum would be for ploughing. The engines were too heavy to pull the plough on soft earth. The used an anchored pulley at the other end of the field, and pulled the plough with the cable. This practice was common in the UK.
Steve R.
Reply to
Steve R.
very nice!
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Here's another one, a different engine:
Now to Gunner Arsch, Iggiot and Larry Spongebob who say that I don't do real metalworking... Hahahahaha!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Who ever claimed you dont do real machining? Not I.
I just think you are a net nazi.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
Nick Mueller is lying, as usual, as I never claimed that he did not do any real metalworking. (though, admittedly, this nice looking engine does not serve any real purpose).
i
Reply to
Ignoramus13560
And I *know* that you can only talk nonsense, crap, politics and do some farts. Nothing else. Now back under your stone ...
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
The purpose of it is to make you look even more stupid! In case you don't understand the purpose of a display model.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Oh, and adding to your stupidity: Didn't you shout out loud here that you plonked me? Ah, forgot, you are a lamer and a bloody old liar, nothing new. :-)))
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller

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