Starting low voltage TIG

I have a question, I'm welding thin (1mm) stainless steel using a TIG welder. I don't have any real experince with TIG welding, and I'm having a heck of a time getting it to start the arc. If I up the voltage then I have too much heat and burn through the metal. I still sometimes have a hard time starting the arc, but I can start the arc. If I drop the voltage then no matter what I do I just can't start the arc. I've tried the trick of running the TIG tip down the metal and it sparks a little bit, but nothing else. What am I doing wrong? Sorry for the bad explantion, my real area of knowedge is comptuers not metal working, I do this as a hobby only, and I do it poorly at that.

Reply to
Zipper
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What kind of Tig Welder are you using?

Reply to
John D

:-( I know, I know, I know, but it's all I can afford, and I had "some" luck with their MIG welder, so I thought I would try it. It actually seems nicer than their MIG welder it just doesn't have the higher starting voltage like the nice ones do. :-(

Reply to
Zipper

With the higher priced welders you have a high frequency start and a foot pedal to helps regulate the heat, as you know all of this dramatically helps with starting the arc, otherwise you have to use a strike type start, like with arc welding. IF you practice with the "sctrach" start you can get pretty proficient and turn out some pretty nice work, just maybn not at the 1mm thick like you want.

Reply to
Bandit

Try cold scratching.

Sometimes as teh tungsten cools a very thin layer of oxide forms on teh surface acting as an insulator.

If you scratch the tungsten on clean metal before trying to start the arc, you will find the arc will start much more consistently.

Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

Ernie, Are you using a machine with a foot pedal? Does it have a highfrequency switch? Does it have AC/DC/ DC reverse? Do you have argon or helium? What shade # is the lens in your helmet? Then, if you do get it lit, is the rod no thicker than the tubing you are welding? I have been TIG welding for about 30 years. There should be no oxide on your tungsten, if you have a post-flow for your gas, and do not throw any tungsten away, just switch to .40 if you have it. If not, sharpen your existing piece to a point, like an icepick, almost.

your starting voltage should not effect starting like the high frequency. Is there a frequency shift adjustment? Are you using a torch with a collet setup, or a gas lens?(to hold the tungsten) What size cup are you using? Do you have a flowmeter for your gas? Maybe you should e-mail me at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com

Reply to
bmwsid

Sid. Try to follow the threads. I was responding to the original poster.

Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

What will cause a redish/orangish soot to be left on the weldment and the area around it?

Gunner

Liberals - Cosmopolitan critics, men who are the friends of every country save their own. Benjamin Disraeli

Reply to
Gunner

In TIG? Bad gas shielding. If you have soot like that your tungsten will likely be purple from oxidation as well.

Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

Ill check the electrode. I found it rather wierd to have a thin coating of this Stuff around the weldment. I was wondering if Praxair gave me a contaminated tank. This town has few if any tig welders who buy their case from Praxair..they prefer to drive the 40 miles to the Other Guys. Better service, better price and better attitude.

The guy running the local outlet is only animated while ringing up the sale, and if you are in the store .-5 seconds after handing your your change..its "What the fuck are you still doing here?"

Sorry..I got off track for a second..a minor bugaboo of mine...shrug

Gunner

"At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child - miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosphy of sniveling brats." -- P.J. O'Rourke

Reply to
Gunner

Mountain Dew fumes are contaminating the weld, before and after you drink it!

Reply to
Tom Gardner

What sort of a wire brush would be suitable for removing it (:

Reply to
Jim Stewart

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