Steel wire carrying twelve volts ?

On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 15:26:32 +1200, grumpyoldhori


OK. The wire is the HEAVY stuff. Approx 0.21 inch diameter. ANd you have 6 of them. You will be well under 1 ohm per thousand feet and .29 amp current draw? Throw 12 volts on the bottom end and go for it - with each side sharing 3 wires you won't notice the voltage drop at all. Just be ABSOLUTELY SURE to get some kind of effective spike control on the wire to protect against lightning interference.
see: http://www.uwrf.edu/grazing/lightning.pdf http://www.nemtek.co.za/PDF/SingleZoneLightningKit.pdf http://kencove.com/oa/pdf/P31_32.pdf
Then on both the supply and load end, put a honking big 16 - 24 volt zener across the line to clamp the voltage.
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 13:44:17 -0400, clare at snyder dot ontario dot canada wrote:

That is "C Rural" phone drop wire - one pair 18-1/2-gauge copper- plated steel wire, rubber or XLPE insulation and hard rubber or XLPE outer jacket. Meant to be placed under tension using the spiral-wrap preformed steel dead-end grips to pull tension, you can go 300' to 400' between poles with it.

And you still want the wires that will be used for power hung from insulators. The cheap plastic standoffs for electric fence wire should be more than adequate, they make clip-ons for steel 'T' fence posts and nail-on for wood.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Sat, 26 Apr 2008 13:41:34 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,

Here are eBay-NZ sources for solar panels, Grumps: http://tinyurl.com/5bv7vr

I wonder: at what voltage did they run field phones?

And we find sheep tasty. Fair trade, wot?
-- Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life. -- Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
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On Sat, 26 Apr 2008 19:55:47 -0700, Larry Jaques

Speak for yerself, Larry!
Know why Scotsmen wear kilts? Because sheep can hear zippers...wham, bam, thank you lamb!
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 00:24:37 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Don

All I can say is: SHEEP LIE!
That from:
An Indian was walking down a lone desert highway with some his animals, when he was suddenly approached by a man. Little did the Indian know, the man was a ventriloquist with a sick sense of humor. The man asks the indian: "Hello, may I speak to your horse?".
Indian replies "Horse no talk..."
The man looks at the horse and says "Hello horse, how are you?" to which the horse replied "Man, this guy runs me around all, doesn't feed me jack, makes me sleep outside... I am about to take off on this guy!".
The Indian was astounded! He looked at the man and said "Horse no talk before...".
The man asked the indian if he could talk to his dog. The indian replied "Dog no talk...". The man turned to the dog and said "Hello dog, how are you?" to which the dog replied,"Man, I chase this guy's sheep around all day! And for what??? I sleep outside, eat a few scraps, and get ordered around all day! I am about ready to take off on this guy too!"
The Indian was again astounded... He said in a quivering voice "Dog no talk before...".
The man asked the indian if he could talk to his sheep, to which the indian replied "Sheep lie! SHEEP LIE!"
-- Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life. -- Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
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On Sat, 26 Apr 2008 19:55:47 -0700, Larry Jaques

6 volts All of my field phones (modest collection) use 4 D batteries.

Ayup
Gunner
Political Correctness is a doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 16:08:04 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

You mean Larry and Lambikins?
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2008 18:04:23 -0500, cavelamb himself

Bet Larry knows how to do it with no hands. Giddyup, whoa, backup, whoa....
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On Mon, 28 Apr 2008 01:06:23 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Don

You betcha. Now will you guys lay off the Single Guy jokes? You're just jealous because we know how to switch hands and GAIN a stroke.
-- As a curmudgeon, I grok that in its entirety. --LJ
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I'm not following what you say about wire size. Is this 8-gage wire? (0.16" diameter, or thereabouts -- 0.13 if it's gaged by AWG). And it has a 0.004" galvanized coating?
-- Ed Huntress
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the best advice you have so far is to use aprox 48VAC on one or two of the top most wires to send the power up the hill to the router, then convert back down to whatever you need for the router - the router itself probably has a switching power supply that can accept inputs from about 100 to 300VAC, so if you start out with 220 to 48 transformer at the bottom and put a matching transformer at the top, the result will be a lower voltage that is still within the tolerance of the router's power supply.
Be sure to protect against weather.
Note- if you get enough rain that the soil stays reasonably damp, you only need one wire, ground the other side
also remember that power = volts times amps, so if you increase from 12 to 48V, your current goes down by 1/4, as does the voltage drop across the length of wire.

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William Noble wrote:

Many of these small net appliances use low voltage AC or DC for power, not a wide-range AC supply. Thinking of what we call "wall warts" here in the US. The OP indicated it needed 12 V DC. I think he plans to supply the 12 V DC directly to the device, without going back up to mains voltage first.
Jon
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Jon Elson wrote:

Having read allthe posts on this thread, Im cross with myself for not thinking it earlier. So this equipment is onthe top of a hill It would be simpler to use some 12 volt car/truck batteries charged up with a 12 v wind generator. Lack of sunshine wont effect it!!. nor darkness of night. Nor lightning induced emf in the fence wires. whats the average wind speed up there? If all you want is .5 amp , then generate 2 amps for half the time will cover any charging losses. The smallest car 12v dc dynamo , from a Morris Minor, I believe youve plenty of thee in NZ. with its associated Lucas regulator and cutout. A 3 ft dia 3 bladed prop will do. Your local met office will have records of wind speed and direction over several years, o will any local airfield or gliding club. Just a thought!!!. Ted Dorset UK
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I know this is an old post by now, but I hope you did do a test. I didn't see where anybody took the zinc into account in their resistance calculations. If the coating is in good shape, it might help. If it doesn't work out that way, you could simply buy the cheapest 16 or 18 gage weather proof wire pair available and run 120vac up the hill, putting the 12 volt supply at the top. I suppose you could even run 24 volts ac or so up the hill on the steel wire, then transform it to 120vac, accounting for losses, at the top for the power supply.
Pete Stanaitis ----------------
grumpyoldhori wrote:

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http://otherpower.com/otherpower_wind_tips.html#design
http://otherpower.com / Political Correctness is a doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
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Yes. But there will not be enough current available to run whatever the thing is you want. A crude method is to bump up the bottom end volts, then stick a constant current regulator at the top to float charge a small battery (NICAD/SLA whatever?)- you might get only a few milliamps, but should do it, assuming load is not constant. Google on LM317 applications for a circuit....and stick a fuse at the bottom lest a cow drop a short on the wires...
Naturally, as in all things technical, there will be incredibly complicated alternatives involving heaps of planning, research, work, and expense....
Andrew VK3BFA.
Andrew VK3BFA.

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