Success in cutting glass tubing

All,
Just posted some pix of the procedure I used to cut this glass tubing.
I had tried just about everything, and tried a lot of different
suggestions, but just wasn't having any luck. Received a diamond
disk, made an arbor for a small motor for it, clamped motor to
lathe carriage, chucked the glass tube in the lathe, added
a water feed (hand held/controlled siphon tube out of a gallon
jug), and fed in the cross-slide ..... SUCCESS. Only had to
touch up the ends a bit with a diamond hone and it's finished.
The last picture in the dropbox is of the "uncompleted" oiler
for a Hit n Miss engine just a little over 2" high. The top glass
is the oil reservoir, and there is a tiny tube of glass in the
bottom for the "drip" to go through. Thanks for all the
suggestions/help from everyone. Glad *this* part is done :-)
If you want to see my crude setup, the link is:
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glass tubing0.txt
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glass tubing1.jpg
etc.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
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Ken, after a sigh of relief, smiles. Then thanks the contributors. That is the way it oughta be.
Should that read "cool setup" instead of "crude setup"?
michael
Reply to
michael
You consider that crude, you should see some of the lash-ups I have come up with from time to time. If it achieves the desired result and nothing gets broken, then success is sweet. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Don't get your undies in a bundle yet DoN, the actual links are:
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Nice stuff. BTW, that's a pretty large "small motor". :^)
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @
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Reply to
Tim Williams
Congratulations on a job very well done, Ken.
Could you tell us a little more about the setup? The diameter and thickness of the diamond disk, and the source. Could it be that HF has them? They seem to have a nice variety of diamond coated tools.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
Vise grips, duct tape, and coffee cans. The earth, wind and fire of mechanical improvisation.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
And dont forget bailing wire. It binds the universe together.
Gunner
That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or labourer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there. - George Orwell
Reply to
Gunner
I thought it was JB Weld and superglue that held the universe together!
Learn something new everyday
Mike
Reply to
The Davenports
Outstanding work:
This is a drip-feed oiler, yes? Have you set up an adjustable needle valve for it, on the top?
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
In my case it's blue poly-twine. In '85 I supervised an underground electrical installation where the first thing through the duct was twine fed from a commercial boxed source. Once used it was to be discarded, so, being supervisor with time on my hands, I bundled it up for latter rewinding on spools. I gave away about 3/4 of that salvage, then in '97, after retirement, I worked as labour on a local job for the same contractor. This time I was working so the twine went into garbage bags in the shed. I still have 4 of 6 of these - enough to last another 20-30 years! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Bailing wire is used until the JB sets up
Gunner
That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or labourer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there. - George Orwell
Reply to
Gunner
No, Michael, I think "crude" is appropriate :-) .... I'm not one to spend a week making a setup so it is pretty and perfect - I just need it to do the job, and as such, sometimes it's crude even if just temporary. This particular little motor had a mounting plate (just like a downsized dryer motor for example) and I just took the toolpost off the compound, set the motor on top (on the flat area), clamped the backside of the motor mount with a pair of visegrips and the front side with a "squeezeable" bar type clamp. The motor was solid, and in correct alignment and there really wasn't going to be much stress/strain on it - so that's the way I went. Yeah, I guess crude would be right. But it worked and was only needed to be set up that way for about 15 minutes, then got torn down. Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
That's kinda the way I was looking at the job, Gerry. I didn't want to spend a lot of time, especially not knowing how well the disk was going to cut anyway...... Yeah - sweet is a good word :-) Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
Yeah, DoN, sorry 'bout that.... Not until Tim mentioned it in this post did I remember some previous posts about spaces... I apologize (and honestly will try to remember for the next time). Thanks for the post Tim, the motor is a little Robbins & Myers that I picked up at some kind of a salvage place (5/16 shaft, 1650 RPM) for a cool $5 and I have used that little sucker for all kinds of stuff - I even have a flexible shaft that I drive from it. It's only 1/12 HP, but it's kinda handy. Sure worked good for me this time. Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
N "Duct tape is like the force: It has a light side and a dark side, and it holds the universe together."
And -- I actully *know* Carl Zwanzig, and was surprised to find the quote in my first unix computer -- back around 1983 or so.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Thanks..... after all the failed attempts, finally getting this little chunk of tubing cut to length without shattering does feel kinda good :-) Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
Jim, It is a "downsized" oiler for a small hit n miss engine and the entire engine is only about 12-1/2" long with 6" flywheels. I've never had to do any work this small before - and I've screwed up a lot just learning how to "work small". Even got a couple of pairs of those "headband magnifiers" recently to help out. I never had to make anything this tiny/accurate and it's a whole new learning experience. And, yes, since I now have the tubing cut for the reservoir, I made the needle valve/spring and toggle handle this evening for the operation of the drip. I haven't done much to the main engine castings, as yet, as I mentally thought working on the tiny stuff would hone my skills a little, so I would be ready for a little more accurate work on the castings (like machining the valves, valve seats, bearings and bearing caps, etc). I think my reasoning is "panning out" :-) Thanks, Jim and all for the compliments - although I just wanted everyone to know the purpose for "fighting with such a short piece of glass tubing". Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
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I didn't comment on this -- because apparently Steve changed the filenames while checking the uploads. At least, they were proper underscores when I saw them. (I had to go to the "sort by date" option to find them, after "wget" failed to download the first two.
It was only that which showed me that there was more than one image.
Since you did not list the filenames in the ".txt" file, nothing had to be fixed there, either. :-)
No need to apologize to me -- I didn't post anything about it. I know how to work around the spaces -- but they are a pain. Someone new to unix may not -- or may not realize how bad an idea it is to leave the names with spaces unmodified until the crontab operated housekeeping programs hit the files. :-)
Anyway -- a neat operation. Congratulations.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Thanks for the compliment, Harold - it's appreciated as I certainly don't qualify as a machinist by any means, but I manage to get a few things done - and I'm learning every day. The glass tube is a "Pyrex" type (borosilicate ?sp) from McMaster-Carr and is 5/8 od with a pretty heavy wall. All my other methods failed and resulted in shattered tubing, etc. I received this diamond disk, with a .010 edge, which cuts a little over .040 deep and has a .750 bore (made from aluminum). Had to make an arbor for it, but that really didn't take that long. The glass tubing was wrapped in *one* single layer of masking tape so it could be held in the 4-jaw on my lathe. Carefully indicated it to 0 runout (or let's say as close as I could get to 0 ), and mounted the motor to the top of the compound. As the compound has a t-slot in it, I swivelled it around so the slot was parallel to the ways of the lathe (in line with the crossfeed), and extended the compound out far enough to have a little overhang on the backside so I could clamp the backside of the motor mount to the compound. The front side of the motor was secured with a squeeze type bar clamp (down to the handle of the compound) with just enough tension to hold the motor securely. A gallon jug of water, with a small length of 1/8 tubing for a siphon hose was to supply the water and it was to be controlled simply by squeeze pressure with my fingers. Water jug set on top of the belt cover on the lathe gave me enough height for the siphon to work. At this point - I didn't actually know if I was going to have any luck or not, but rolled the carriage over to the end of the broken tubing to make a clean-up cut. Advance the cross-slide to the almost touch-off point. Fired up the disk motor, the lathe power, and started to let the water run. Carefully fed in the cross-slide to the touch-off point and just carefully kept feeding/watering/hoping. Going slow, as I didn't know what to expect. Shortly, plink - the rough/broken end simply fell down onto the paper towels I had laying on the ways for protection. Ya could'a *heard* me smiling.... Indicated over the 11/16 I needed for my second cut - and it worked as nicely as the first one. The lathe was turning at 164 RPM (I calculated 5/8 tubing to be about 26.8 SFPM) and the motor speed (fixed) for the disk is 1650 - with the OD of the disk being 2.190 (should be about 946 SFPM). I didn't want to spin the glass too fast, and didn't really have any simple means of disk speed - (and I couldn't find a feed&speed for cutting glass tubing :-) ) - but it all worked out. It's just another operation I now have a little bit of experience with - and just knowing I can do it, is what feels so good. Ken
Reply to
Ken Sterling

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